Combat Climate Change

Accelerating mitigation and adaptation

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time. Global mean surface temperature during the decade 2006-2015 was observed to be 0.87°C higher than the average over the 1850-1900 period. A reflection of the long-term warming trend since pre-industrial times.

Rising temperatures and sea levels, together with ocean acidification, is seriously affecting many coastal areas, which encompass many underdeveloped countries and small islands. More frequent occurrence and higher intensity of natural disasters is threatening the natural ecosystem. At the same time, humanity is facing risks to health, loss of property and compromised water and food security.

The climate sessions will explore climate change challenges and possibilities for accelerating both its mitigation and our adaptation to it. We will look into governance, economic measures and financing for implementing adaptation options that help achieve SDGs.

Conference programme

Climate

24 October 2021

Plenary session
The democratisation of technology: indigenous values and the future of digitalisation
16:00 - 17:20
Dubai Exhibition Centre

Circular Economy, Climate, ICT, Entrepreneurship

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Circular Economy Climate ICT Entrepreneurship

Plenary session

The democratisation of technology: indigenous values and the future of digitalisation

24/10/2021, 16:00 - 17:20 GST (Dubai)

14:00 - 15:20 CEST/SAST (Brussels, Cape Town)

13:00 - 14:20 WAT (Nigeria)

08:00 - 09:20 EDT (New York)

21:00 - 22:20 KST (Seoul)

20:00 - 21:20 CST (Beijing)

17:30 - 18:50 IST (New Delhi)

09:00 - 10:20 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Dubai Exhibition Centre & online

Join us online >

Join us in Dubai >

Technology is not a new concept limited to advanced societies. In one form or another, it has been around for a very long time, with indigenous peoples sharing technological knowledge within their communities and among their tribal networks.

The digitalisation and social media we are familiar with today bears a notable resemblance to how knowledge was distributed among ancient communities. But as our current technological revolution in its virtual space advances at breakneck speed, the task of maintaining a link with what’s happening “in the real world” becomes even more important. Especially if we are to meet the universal values in the Agenda 2030 transformative promise of “Leaving no one behind”.

This session will set the scene for further discussion around democratisation of technology, by evaluating frontier technologies in the context of how these can benefit from adopting indigenous values. It will also explore the evolution of the digital networks and platforms shaping our social and economic models, with a focus on their impact on our current daily lives and possible implications for the future.

Context will also be provided via a video titled “The ingenious values for the future”, created by students from Zayed University of the College of Arts and Creative Enterprises (CACE, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), under the leadership of Associate Professors Marco Sosa and Lina Ahmad.

This session is undertaken in collaboration with the Resilience Frontiers Initiative.

Chaired by

Musonda  Mumba

Musonda Mumba

UNDP, Rome Centre for Sustainable Development

Director

Musonda Mumba, a Zambian National, is the Director for The Rome Centre for Sustainable Development under United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in close collaboration with Italian Government (Ministry of Environment and Ecological Transition). The Centre focuses on three priority areas notably: Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Nature Protection. In her role, she provides strategic leadership on these matters through convening, collaboration, connecting and co-creation as the world navigates complexity and uncertainty, with the aim of achieving the SDGs collectively. Her ambition is that this work is done with a Systems Thinking lens and also Systems Leadership.

She has over 25 years’ experience in environmental and conservation issues globally. She is the Chair of the Global Partnership on Forest and Landscape Restoration (GPFLR) and Vice-Chair for the Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF). She is also the Founder of the Network of African Women Environmentalists (NAWE).

She has published widely in various journals, newspapers, articles and contributed to book chapters. Before joining UNDP, Musonda was the head of United Nations Environment Programme – UNEP’s Terrestrial Ecosystems Programme and served in various roles over a period of 12 years. Before working for UNEP, Musonda worked for the Zambian Government, Ramsar Convention on Wetlands (in Switzerland), WWF (at International, UK and East Africa Regional Offices) and as such working with governments on Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America.

She received her BSc. Ed degree at University of Zambia (UNZA) and has a PhD from University College London (UCL) in Wetland Conservation and Hydrology.

Facilitated by

Sandra Piesik

Sandra Piesik

3 Ideas B.V.

Director

Sandra Piesik is an award-winning architect, author and researcher specialising in the implementation of global sustainable legislation, nature-based solutions and traditional knowledge adaptation. She is the founder of 3 ideas B.V. Amsterdam based consultancy, a senior consultant to UN-HABITAT on Urban and Rural Linkages at the Urban Practices Branch, and a former Policy Support Consultant on Rural – Urban Dynamics to UNCCD. Her diverse global engagements range from international lectures, judging of the competitions, nominator of awards, and evaluation of R&D projects for the European Union.

She is a stakeholder and network member of several UN organisations including UNFCCC: The Resilience Frontiers, the Nairobi Work Programme (NWP), the Paris Committee on Capacity Building (PCCB) and Climate and Technology Centre & Network (CTCN).

Her published work includes Arish: Palm-Leaf Architecture (published by: Thames & Hudson in 2012), she is also the general editor of the encyclopaedia, HABITAT: Vernacular Architecture for a Changing Planet (published by: Thames & Hudson, Abrams Books, Flammarion, Editions Detail and Blume in 2017).

Video: The ingenious values for the future

Keynote speech

Achieving intergenerational equity and the future role of frontier technologies

Youssef  Nassef

Youssef Nassef

UNFCCC

Director Adaptation

Youssef Nassef leads the work on adaptation to climate change under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. He has 30 years of experience in diplomacy and international environmental policy and is a seconded diplomat from the Egyptian Foreign Service.

While assuming progressively higher levels of leadership at the UNFCCC, he led UNFCCC support for a number of on-going initiatives on adaptation. These include the inception of National Adaptation Programme of Action, National Adaptation Plans, the Nairobi Work Programme (an international knowledge hub for impacts, vulnerability and adaptation) and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage.

Youssef holds a doctorate in international technology policy and management and a master’s degree in international environmental policy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, as well as a master’s degree in Middle East studies and a bachelor’s degree in computer science and physics from the American University in Cairo.

Keynote speech

Inclusivity and digital technologies in support of the coexistence of humanity with nature

Hindou  Oumarou Ibrahim

Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim

United Nations

SDG Advocate

Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim is an environmental activist and member of Chad’s pastoralist Mbororo community, a UN Sustainable Development Goal Advocate and Conservation International Senior Fellow.

Hindou began advocating for Indigenous rights and environmental protection at age 16, founding the Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad (AFPAT) to introduce new income revenue activities for women and collaborative tools such as 3D participatory mapping to build sustainable ecosystems management and reduction of nature-based resource conflicts. Her vision is to grow support for both traditional knowledge and science to improve resilience to climate change especially for rural communities.

Presentation

The democratisation of technology and the indigenous values of nature

Traditionally, societies have typically built their living environments together, both out of necessity and because of a sense of tribal belonging. Especially in the Middle East, and in Dubai itself, cities and architecture reflected the social structure, and this was represented through neighbourhoods and layouts of individual homes. The scarce resources of a desert climate were shared democratically, as was technical knowledge and know-how. Nothing gleaned from natural resources would go to waste and, for millennia, this aided the development of bio-circular economy models as sound environmental and economic practices. Nature was (and to some extent still is) a source of life and a supporter of livelihoods.

This talk will explore indigenous values in the context of the democratisation of technology and the value of nature, as a basis for looking at new ways in which contemporary digital technologies could benefit from the adoption of these values.

Sandra Piesik

Sandra Piesik

3 Ideas B.V.

Director

Sandra Piesik is an award-winning architect, author and researcher specialising in the implementation of global sustainable legislation, nature-based solutions and traditional knowledge adaptation. She is the founder of 3 ideas B.V. Amsterdam based consultancy, a senior consultant to UN-HABITAT on Urban and Rural Linkages at the Urban Practices Branch, and a former Policy Support Consultant on Rural – Urban Dynamics to UNCCD. Her diverse global engagements range from international lectures, judging of the competitions, nominator of awards, and evaluation of R&D projects for the European Union.

She is a stakeholder and network member of several UN organisations including UNFCCC: The Resilience Frontiers, the Nairobi Work Programme (NWP), the Paris Committee on Capacity Building (PCCB) and Climate and Technology Centre & Network (CTCN).

Her published work includes Arish: Palm-Leaf Architecture (published by: Thames & Hudson in 2012), she is also the general editor of the encyclopaedia, HABITAT: Vernacular Architecture for a Changing Planet (published by: Thames & Hudson, Abrams Books, Flammarion, Editions Detail and Blume in 2017).

Presentation

Cultural values and shared assets. Contextual technological intelligence for the future

For millennia, family and cultural traditions have been passed down the generations through verbal storytelling. Can this traditional knowledge be transformed into AI-suitable datasets? And if so, does this represent an important step in helping future machines become deeply aware of global cultures? Davar Ardalan, founder of IVOW AI, will explore these questions and demonstrate ways to nurture sustainable action through food data and artificial intelligence.

Ardalan will present methods for fostering reasoning in machines by creating structure around recipes and demand for this data. Discovering, sharing, gifting and preserving a world of food enables consumers and enterprises alike to promote healthy eating habits and sustainable communities. It also helps to reduce data inequalities, thereby creating a positive real-world impact. Expanding and preserving this data ensures that family and cultural values are not lost in our collective transition to a more digital and automated world.

Davar  Ardalan

Davar Ardalan

IVOW AI, Inc.

Founder

Davar Ardalan is the founder and chief storytelling officer at IVOW – intelligent voices of wisdom. Realizing that there is a gaping hole in AI algorithms that will define our future stories, Davar created IVOW, to champion culturally conscious data strategies across multiple industries from academia to development and enterprise.

Ardalan, who is also an Executive Producer at National Geographic, served as co-chair of the Cultural Heritage and AI track at ITU’s AI For Good in 2020. Prior to this, she was Deputy Director of the White House Presidential Innovation Fellowship Program in Washington D.C. and before that a long-time journalist at NPR News, where she was Senior Producer of the Identity and Culture Unit.

Ardalan, who has also served as Managing Editor at Hanson Robotics, has been recognized with a NASA Team Leadership award for Space Apps, a Gracie Award from the American Women in Radio and Television and a shout-out in the comic strip Zippy. In May 2014, she was the recipient of a United States Ellis Island Medal of Honor, for individual achievement and for promoting cultural unity.

Presentation

Integrity of platform based social and economic models

Climate change has recently exposed numerous vulnerabilities in supply chains. Blockchain technology can help us “rethink the wheel” by performing a critical role in future platforms that incorporate economically non-traditional modalities, such as sustainability, environmental protection, circular economy, financial inclusion, community engagement and socio-economic empowerment. In doing so, it offers an opportunity to de-risk the value chain and increase trust, while increasing community and customer engagement.

Blockchain can do this by providing distributed ledgers that report, measure and verify product attributes and claims throughout the supply chain. This will open up traditional data silos allowing for increased visibility and better decision making.

Blockchain technology, which can be applied to a broad diversity of areas, from petrochemical products to agricultural products to ocean plastics, has the ability to capture product data throughout the value chain while simultaneously protecting stakeholders’ commercial interests. This provides verified transparency and accountability, together with a powerful tool for socioeconomic empowerment and financial inclusion in marginalised populations.

Stan  Chen

Stan Chen

RecycleGO

CEO & Co-Founder

An eco-entrepreneur, Stan’s passion for sustainability along with 20+ years of experience in the recycling industry has provided the knowledge needed to design and develop ever-innovative solutions for the recycling industry, the economy, and the environment.

Q&A and discussion

Closing

Musonda  Mumba

Musonda Mumba

UNDP, Rome Centre for Sustainable Development

Director

Musonda Mumba, a Zambian National, is the Director for The Rome Centre for Sustainable Development under United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in close collaboration with Italian Government (Ministry of Environment and Ecological Transition). The Centre focuses on three priority areas notably: Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Nature Protection. In her role, she provides strategic leadership on these matters through convening, collaboration, connecting and co-creation as the world navigates complexity and uncertainty, with the aim of achieving the SDGs collectively. Her ambition is that this work is done with a Systems Thinking lens and also Systems Leadership.

She has over 25 years’ experience in environmental and conservation issues globally. She is the Chair of the Global Partnership on Forest and Landscape Restoration (GPFLR) and Vice-Chair for the Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF). She is also the Founder of the Network of African Women Environmentalists (NAWE).

She has published widely in various journals, newspapers, articles and contributed to book chapters. Before joining UNDP, Musonda was the head of United Nations Environment Programme – UNEP’s Terrestrial Ecosystems Programme and served in various roles over a period of 12 years. Before working for UNEP, Musonda worked for the Zambian Government, Ramsar Convention on Wetlands (in Switzerland), WWF (at International, UK and East Africa Regional Offices) and as such working with governments on Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America.

She received her BSc. Ed degree at University of Zambia (UNZA) and has a PhD from University College London (UCL) in Wetland Conservation and Hydrology.

Deep dive session
CO2 capture and utilisation (CCU) in the Middle-East
16:00 - 17:30
Dubai Exhibition Centre

Climate

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Climate

Deep dive session

CO2 capture and utilisation (CCU) in the Middle-East

24/10/2021, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

14:00 - 15:30 CEST/SAST (Brussels, Cape Town)

13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

08:00 - 09:30 EDT (New York)

21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Dubai Exhibition Centre & online

Join us online >

Join us in Dubai >

Despite strong ties to the hydrocarbon sector, this region is increasingly committing to reducing its carbon footprint and introducing renewable and sustainable energy sources. Several large-scale enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects have been launched and other approaches involving CCU are gaining ground. Technology plays an important role, and synergies with Europe mean there are opportunities to collaborate. This session will showcase latest developments.

Chaired by

Deepak Pant

Deepak Pant

VITO

Senior Scientist

Deepak is a senior scientist at the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO). He is currently working on electrosynthesis and resource recovery, specifically the design and optimisation of (bio)electrochemical cells for CO2 conversion and microbial electrosynthesis.

Pant has a PhD in environmental biotechnology and has 150 peer-reviewed publications (h-Index 61; >11300 citations), 6 books (edited), 6 patents and 35 book chapters to his credit.

He is also a member of various scientific communities such as ISMET (elected board member), ISE, BES, BRSI (Fellow), RSC, IFIBiop and AMI.

Deepak is the editor of “Bioresource Technology Reports” and serves as an Editorial board member for the journals Bioresource Technology, ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering iScience, Scientific Reports, Molecules, World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Electronic Journal of Biotechnology, Biofuel Research Journal, and Heliyon and Frontiers in Environmental Science.

 

Presentation

CO2 sequestration through Mineral Carbonation: Current practice and future prospective

CO2 sequestration through mineral carbonation (MC) is a process that involves reacting CO2 with alkaline compounds, such as calcium and magnesium oxides. The technique, which can be deployed through natural weathering or by accelerated carbonation, may be able to be scaled to fully sequester the CO2 emitted by several industries.

The MC process can be carried out through direct and indirect techniques and it is often controlled by several parameters such as alkalinity, pre-treatment method, particle size, solid to liquid ratio, temperature, and pressure. These parameters directly influence the CO2 uptake capacity by changing the kinetics and mass transfer. Using different feedstocks can lead to a wide array of uptake capacities. Alkaline solid wastes, such as steel dust and slag, cement and construction materials waste, fly ash, and red mud can be utilised to permanently sequester CO2, stabilise these solid wastes, and produce valuable products.

Muftah El-Naas

Muftah El-Naas

Qatar University

Director Gas Processing Center

Currently a professor at Qatar University’s Gas Processing Center, Muftah H. El-Naas has also served as the Center’s Director and Chair of QAFCO. His areas of expertise include CO2 capture, water purification, biotechnology, plasma technology and membrane separation. Most of his recent research work focusses on the development of new, environmentally friendly processes for the Oil and Gas industry.

Presentation

Towards efficient utilisation of Carbon Dioxide: the role of heterogeneous catalysis

Utilisation of CO2 as a feedstock for producing fine chemicals and renewable fuels is a highly promising field. Implementing it at scale presents unique challenges, but heterogeneous catalysis, with its simple operation and industrial compatibility, can be an effective means of achieving it.

This presentation will summarise recent developments in heterogeneous thermal catalysis for the production of carbon monoxide, alcohols and hydrocarbons from CO2. It will also provide a detailed discussion on structure-activity correlations between catalyst surface and intermediate species which can aid in rational design of future generation catalysts. Effects of active metal components, catalyst supports and promoters will be emphasised. Process design and life cycle analysis considerations will also briefly be discussed.

Jorge  Gascon

Jorge Gascon

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

Professor Chemical Engineering

Born in Huesca (Spain) in 1977, Jorge completed his master’s degree in chemistry in 2002 and his PhD cum laude in Chemical Engineering in 2006, both at the University of Zaragoza (Spain). He was post-doc (2006 to 2009), Assistant Professor (2010 to 2012), Associate Professor (2012 to 2014) and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Professor (2014 – 2017) of Catalysis Engineering at TUDelft (NL). Since 2017, he has been Professor of Chemical Engineering and Director at the KAUST Catalysis Center. Recently, he was appointed Lead of the KAUST Circular Carbon Initiative.

Gascon is a member of the board of the International Zeolite Association Commission on Metal Organic Frameworks. He has been the recipient of the prestigious VENI (2010), VIDI (2013) and ERC Starting (2013) personal grants and of the 2013 ExxonMobil Chemical European Science and Engineering Award. He is also a 2018 and 2019 Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited researcher. Jorge’s group at KAUST aims to develop and deploy sustainable technologies for the production of chemicals, energy carriers and new environmental applications. Process intensification, feedstock efficiency and reduction of energy usage are their main objectives. With an H-Index of 81 and over 26,000 citations, he has published over 280 journal articles, 9 patents and several book chapters.

Presentation

CCU Matters: The importance of having abundant renewable energy for CCU solutions

The IPCC scenario states that CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry should be reduced, while negative CO2 emissions are gradually introduced after 2030, to achieve net-zero emission in 2070. For this, the IEA elaborated the sustainable development scenario, describing the contribution of different strategies in the energy sector and industry. Next to an enhanced technology performance and renewables-based industry and energy production, the application of renewable electricity as primary energy source will be important. This will be a scarce energy source in the future, and not able to serve locally all sustainable strategies like electrification, H2 production, CO2 capture and utilization/storage. This presentation will deal with the main criteria and other factors to prioritize these strategies within different sectors and elucidate the role and impact of CCU applications.

Walter Eevers

Walter Eevers

VITO

Director of Research & Development

Walter Eevers is Director of Research & Development at VITO, Belgium. After obtaining his PhD in electrically conductive polymers from Antwerp University, he joined Nitto Europe where he was responsible for R&D and business development until becoming General Manager of Techno-Marketing. Walter became involved in global technology sourcing and marketing by setting up multiple collaborations with universities and research institutes.

In 2012, Eevers helped found Nitto Denko Europe Technical Centre in Lausanne as a company dedicated to research activities for medical devices. Eevers is also an external Expert and Vice Chair for the EU Commission, Conacyt (Mexico) and the Qatar Foundation for innovation programmes and projects. He is Vice-President of CO2 Value Europe, an industry association promoting and stimulating CCU.

Eevers is also Chairman of the Board of EnergyVille, the collaboration between KU Leuven, University of Hasselt, IMEC and VITO for sustainable energy research. In his current position, he has stimulated several spinoffs from VITO and held board positions in them. As a visiting professor at University of Antwerp for polymer chemistry, he is guiding research activities in the field of biobased polymer developments.

 

Presentation

CO2-capture using innovative solid adsorbents to facilitate industrial mineral carbonation

A rapidly-increasing number of structural and non-structural construction materials are being developed using mineral carbonation. This involves creating carbonate-bound products from industrial residues that are rich in Ca and Mg.

The Carbstone technology developed at VITO in collaboration with Orbix accelerates carbonation in curing chambers or autoclaves. This was initially developed for converting stainless steel slag into non-reinforced pre-shaped building materials. Subsequently, it was found that other mineral residues, such as carbon steel slags, incineration bottom ashes and concrete demolition waste, can also be used.

However, local availability of cheap CO2 is often still a bottleneck for industrial production. To overcome this issue, innovative CO2-capture technologies based on solid adsorbents are being developed. VITO is focussing on the development of porous structured sorbents for CO2-capture that enable more cost and energy-efficient CO2 capture from the atmosphere (400ppm CO2) and from dilute (<10% CO2) flue gases at low temperatures (<200°C).

Dirk Vangeneugden

Dirk Vangeneugden

VITO

Business Development Manager

Dirk Vangeneugden is a project and business developer at VITO for sustainable materials and chemistry. He is strongly engaged in national and international R&D projects on chemical catalysis and sorption. Fields of expertise include 3D printing, surface engineering and coating, as well as CO2 capture and conversion. He is actively involved in technology transfers to industry and supporting spin-off initiatives.

Presentation

Andrew Torn

Andrew Torn (TBC)

Emirates Steel

Vice President & CTO

25 October 2021

Thematic plenary session
Role and importance of NDCs in concerted efforts to achieve climate and sustainable development goals
11:15 - 12:45
Dubai Exhibition Centre

Climate, Energy

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Climate Energy

Thematic plenary session

Role and importance of NDCs in concerted efforts to achieve climate and sustainable development goals

25/10/2021, 11:15 - 12:45 GST (Dubai)

09:15 - 10:45 CEST/SAST (Brussels, Cape Town)

08:15 - 09:45 WAT (Nigeria)

03:15 - 04:45 EDT (New York)

16:15 - 17:45 KST (Seoul)

15:15 - 16:45 CST (Beijing)

12:45 - 14:15 IST (New Delhi)

04:15 - 05:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Dubai Exhibition Centre & online

Join us online >

Join us in Dubai >

Nationally determined contributions (NDCs) are at the heart of the Paris Agreement and the achievement of long-term climate goals. They embody each country’s efforts to reduce national emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. The Agreement states that every country is to prepare, communicate and maintain its intended successive NDCs.

Together, these actions will determine whether the world achieves the Agreement’s aims, including reversing the rise of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as soon as possible and following through with rapid reduction. Goals which can be met by utilising the best-available science to achieve a balance between human-caused emissions and their removal in the second half of this century. It is understood that developing countries will take longer to peak their emissions and that reductions will be undertaken on an equitable basis. All must be done in the context of sustainable development and efforts to eradicate poverty, which are critical priorities for many developing countries.

This session will explore the challenges related with using NDCs as a mechanism for achieving climate goals and associated SDGs. How can we create and establish innovative financial mechanisms for implementing them, together with building national and regional capacity? And how can we accelerate this? High-level keynote speakers will share latest insights, examples and best practices.

Chaired by

Francesca  Vanthielen

Francesca Vanthielen

Moderator

Francesca Vanthielen is a Belgian journalist and news anchor, working for the Business TV channel Kanaal Z. She has master’s degrees in applied economic science and international politics from the Catholic University of Leuven. Francesca is very much involved in the topic of climate change and is one of the founding members of Belgian’s Climate Case, a citizen’s initiative that aims to stimulate policy makers to take climate action through a legal procedure.

Keynote speech

Lazarus Chakwera

H.E. Lazarus Chakwera

Republic of Malawi

President

Lazarus Chakwera is a Malawian theologian and politician who has been President of Malawi since June 2020. In addition to the Presidency, he is also self-appointed to the cabinet as Minister of Defence. Mr Chakwera has been leader of the Malawi Congress Party since 2013, and was previously Leader of the Opposition in the National Assembly following highly controversial elections held on 21 May 2019, which were overturned by the Constitutional Court. He was appointed chairman of SADC on 17 August at the SADC 41st Annual Summit held on 9 August to 19 august in Lilongwe, Malawi. He was President of the Malawi Assemblies of God from 1989 to 14 May 2013.

Presentation

Amani Abou-Zeid

H.E. Amani Abou-Zeid

African Union Commission

Commissioner for Infrastructure and Energy

Amani Abou-Zeid is the newly elected Commissioner for Infrastructure and Energy at the African Union Commission (AUC). She is in charge of sectors covering Energy, Transport, Tourism and ICT. Prior to joining the AUC, Abou-Zeid has served for more than 30 years in leadership roles at top-tier international organisations, such as the African Development Bank (AfDB), UNDP and USAID, with a focus on infrastructure and energy programmes.

Over her career, Abou-Zeid has amassed a rare mix of experience from across Africa, France, UK and Canada. She has managed large and complex development programmes, including the largest operations portfolio of the African Development Bank (AfDB). An Egyptian national, Abou-Zeid speaks French, English, Arabic and Spanish. She is a trained telecommunications engineer with an MBA in project management from the French University for African Development (Université Senghor), a Masters of Public Administration from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Social and Economic Development from University of Manchester, UK. She also has a degree in Arts from Université Sorbonne-Paris IV.

Abou-Zeid has received numerous international awards and recognition for her leadership and excellence, including the honour of “Officier de l’Ordre de Wissam Alaouite” from His Majesty King Mohamed VI of Morocco and being recognised as a World Young Leader by the European Union.

Presentation

Rashid Ali Abdallah

Rashid Ali Abdallah

Africa Energy Commission

Executive Director

Rashid Ali Abdallah has been executive director of the African Energy Commission (AFREC) since November 2018. He has more than 20 years of experience in energy, sustainable development and environmental policy at national, regional and continental level. Prior to joining AFREC, Abdallah served as the Head of the Energy Division within the African Union Commission’s Department of Infrastructure and Energy.

In his current role, Abdallah spearheads and leads the delivery of AFREC’s work programmes and strategy, in cooperation with the African Union Commission and African member states, based on continental, regional and national priorities.

A Sudanese national, Abdallah has bachelor’s degrees in mechanical engineering (from the University of Khartoum) and project management (from the University of Birmingham, UK) and a Post Graduate Diploma in energy engineering from Khartoum University.

Presentation

Youssef  Nassef

Youssef Nassef

UNFCCC

Director Adaptation

Youssef Nassef leads the work on adaptation to climate change under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. He has 30 years of experience in diplomacy and international environmental policy and is a seconded diplomat from the Egyptian Foreign Service.

While assuming progressively higher levels of leadership at the UNFCCC, he led UNFCCC support for a number of on-going initiatives on adaptation. These include the inception of National Adaptation Programme of Action, National Adaptation Plans, the Nairobi Work Programme (an international knowledge hub for impacts, vulnerability and adaptation) and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage.

Youssef holds a doctorate in international technology policy and management and a master’s degree in international environmental policy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, as well as a master’s degree in Middle East studies and a bachelor’s degree in computer science and physics from the American University in Cairo.

Presentation

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN)

Director

Rose Mwebaza is the Director of the CTCN and brings 20 years’ experience providing policy advice on a wide range of climate change, environment and sustainable development issues. She has previously served as Chief Natural Resources Officer at the African Development Bank and held leadership positions within the UN Development Programme. Mwebaza was a Lecturer at Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, for 10 years, serving as the Head of Department for Commercial Law and Deputy Dean of the Law School.

Mwebaza holds a PhD in environment and natural resource governance from Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, a master’s degree in international comparative law (with a Certificate of Academic Excellence) from the University of Florida, U.S.A and a bachelor’s degree in law (LL.B, Hons.) from Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

Presentation

Leen Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy and Built Environment

Leen Govaerts holds a master’s degree in business engineering and an executive MBA. Having begun her career researching low carbon mobility at the VITO Research Institute for Sustainable Development, she is currently leading VITO EnergyVille’s research unit for Smart Energy and Built Environment, which deals with sustainable energy and urban sustainability. With an approach based around living labs, key research areas are long-term energy strategies and policy, energy district design and sustainable building concepts.

Leen is an executive committee member for EnergyVille, an association of 400 researchers in sustainable energy and cities from VITO, KU Leuven, Imec and Hasselt University. She is the chairperson of BERA – Belgian Energy Research Alliance – and a member of the executive committee of EERA, the European Energy Research Alliance. She is involved in several international networks and has coordinated a number of European research consortia. Govaerts is also a recognised expert acting on behalf of the Flemish Government evaluating energy and sustainability aspects in relation to renewal of urban districts.

Presentation

Eirik Wærness

Eirik Wærness

Equinor

Senior Vice President and Chief Economist

Senior Vice President and Chief Economist in Equinor, group responsible for macroeconomics and energy and commodity market analyses, and head of strategy in mid- and downstream.

Broad experience from government, academics and private sector companies, as advisor and in different leadership positions. In Equinor, leader of Corporate Strategy, Corporate Planning and Analysis, Economic Analysis in Upstream Norway, Energy Market Analysis in addition to current role.

Currently non-executive member of the Board of Innovation Norway, and member of the Global Commission to examine Geopolitics of Energy Transformation, set up by IRENA, the International Renewable Energy Agency, as well as non-executive member of the Board of Centre for applied research at the Norwegian School of Economics.

July 2016 – February 2018 non-executive member of the Board of the Norwegian Financial Supervisory Authority (Finanstilsynet).

From 2014 in different energy initiatives under World Economic Forum, including special advisor for their work on energy architecture and member of the global council on the future of energy.
In the period 2010-2013 member of the Executive Board of the Central Bank of Norway.

Previous work experience from the Centre for applied research at the Norwegian School of Economics, Norwegian Ministry of Finance, Total E&P Norway, and Pöyry Management Consulting/Econ Centre for economic analysis.

Presentation

Hicham Bouzekri

Hicham Bouzekri

Development and Industry Integration, MASEN

Director of Research

Hisham Bouzekri obtained his engineer diploma in electronics and communications from L’École Mohammadia d’Ingénieurs in 1995. After two years working as a microelectronics industrial process engineer for SGS-Thomson in Casablanca, he was awarded a Fulbright scholarship in 1997 to join the Master of Science program at the University of Florida, from which he graduated in 1998. He went on to get a PhD in electrical engineering from Texas A&M University in 2002. After graduating, Bouzekri was among the pioneers who established STMicroelectronics’ Rabat Integrated Circuit Design Center, a first in Africa.

Hisham Bouzekri held several management positions within STMicroelectronics and ST-Ericsson while concurrently holding an adjunct faculty position at Al Akhawayn University. Over the span of his 24 years of experience, he has co-authored a number of scientific publications and industry standards in wireless communications, and was elected an IEEE senior member.

In 2013, Bouzekri joined Mascir management team, a Moroccan not-for-profit foundation conducting market-oriented R&D in microelectronics, biotechnology & nano-materials. He served as its Chief Executive Officer until 2016.

Between 2017 and 2019, Bouzekri consulted with multiple national and international organisations, including the Moroccan Agency for Sustainable Energy (MASEN) and the United Nations – ESCWA, on establishing innovation and knowledge economy ecosystems. He currently serves as MASEN’s Director of R&D and Industrial Integration.

Closing remarks

Deep dive session
Solutions to overcome data scarcity for NDC’s
14:00 - 15:30
Dubai Exhibition Centre

Climate, Energy

×

Climate Energy

Deep dive session

Solutions to overcome data scarcity for NDC’s

25/10/2021, 14:00 - 15:30 GST (Dubai)

12:00 - 13:30 CEST/SAST (Brussels, Cape Town)

11:00 - 12:30 WAT (Nigeria)

06:00 - 07:30 EDT (New York)

19:00 - 20:30 KST (Seoul)

18:00 - 19:30 CST (Beijing)

15:30 - 17:00 IST (New Delhi)

07:00 - 08:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Dubai Exhibition Centre & online

Join us online >

Join us in Dubai >

While NDCs embody countries’ efforts to adapt to the impacts of climate change, mitigating it by reducing GHG emissions remains a critical part of many policies (and SDG13). Verifiable data is crucial for determining efficient strategies and is pivotal for updating NDCs, as well as monitoring and reporting on implementation and progress. However, it is not available in many areas. This session will zoom in on solutions for overcoming data scarcity and focus on capacity building needs.

Presentation

Youssef  Nassef

Youssef Nassef

UNFCCC

Director Adaptation

Youssef Nassef leads the work on adaptation to climate change under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. He has 30 years of experience in diplomacy and international environmental policy and is a seconded diplomat from the Egyptian Foreign Service.

While assuming progressively higher levels of leadership at the UNFCCC, he led UNFCCC support for a number of on-going initiatives on adaptation. These include the inception of National Adaptation Programme of Action, National Adaptation Plans, the Nairobi Work Programme (an international knowledge hub for impacts, vulnerability and adaptation) and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage.

Youssef holds a doctorate in international technology policy and management and a master’s degree in international environmental policy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, as well as a master’s degree in Middle East studies and a bachelor’s degree in computer science and physics from the American University in Cairo.

Presentation

Rashid Ali Abdallah

Rashid Ali Abdallah

Africa Energy Commission

Executive Director

Rashid Ali Abdallah has been executive director of the African Energy Commission (AFREC) since November 2018. He has more than 20 years of experience in energy, sustainable development and environmental policy at national, regional and continental level. Prior to joining AFREC, Abdallah served as the Head of the Energy Division within the African Union Commission’s Department of Infrastructure and Energy.

In his current role, Abdallah spearheads and leads the delivery of AFREC’s work programmes and strategy, in cooperation with the African Union Commission and African member states, based on continental, regional and national priorities.

A Sudanese national, Abdallah has bachelor’s degrees in mechanical engineering (from the University of Khartoum) and project management (from the University of Birmingham, UK) and a Post Graduate Diploma in energy engineering from Khartoum University.

Presentation

Filip Lefebre

Filip Lefebre

VITO

Urban Climate Service Manager

Filip Lefebre is a business developer and project manager in VITO’s Environmental Modelling business unit’s Climate Service team. This team delivers innovative, sustainable and scientifically sound products and services to better manage, predict and control our shared natural resources (air, water, land, soil, eco-systems), based on computer modelling and information technology. It specialises in the processing of past, present and future climate data into information and services suitable for use by customer-oriented organisations. The Climate Service Team’s expertise covers urban climate services as well as climate health, biodiversity and agriculture services.

Filip has a PhD in physics of regional climate modelling of the Greenland ice sheet (2001) from the Catholic University of Louvain.

Presentation

Cassius Chiwambo

Cassius Chiwambo

Government of Malawi

Director Ministry of Energy

Cassius Chiwambo is a Director at Ministry of Energy in Malawi. He has vast experience in Petroleum and Minerals. Cassius has both Technical as well as Legal skills having done Masters of Mining at Curtin University in Western Australia, Energy and Mineral Law and Policy at Dundee University in Scotland. He is a final year PhD Student pursuing Energy and Petroleum Law at the same institution.

He worked as an Acting Commissioner of Petroleum in Malawi from 2016 to June, 2020 before before appointed as a Director of Energy in July, 2020.

Cassius Chiwambo is the brain behind Malawi’s Upstream Petroleum Sector, having promoted the exploration of actual fuels and also Renewable Sources of Energy from Geothermal and others.

He is currently championing the realization of 1000 MW to the National Grid in 4 years (From 2021 to 2024), which is an Industrial-Economical vision made by His Excellency Dr. Lazarus Mac Cathy Chakwera, the State President of Malawi and supported by Malawi’s National Planing Commission (NPC) and the Agenda 2063 on Universal Access to Electricity.

Panel discussion

Debate

Youssef  Nassef

Youssef Nassef

UNFCCC

Director Adaptation

Youssef Nassef leads the work on adaptation to climate change under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. He has 30 years of experience in diplomacy and international environmental policy and is a seconded diplomat from the Egyptian Foreign Service.

While assuming progressively higher levels of leadership at the UNFCCC, he led UNFCCC support for a number of on-going initiatives on adaptation. These include the inception of National Adaptation Programme of Action, National Adaptation Plans, the Nairobi Work Programme (an international knowledge hub for impacts, vulnerability and adaptation) and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage.

Youssef holds a doctorate in international technology policy and management and a master’s degree in international environmental policy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, as well as a master’s degree in Middle East studies and a bachelor’s degree in computer science and physics from the American University in Cairo.

Rashid Ali Abdallah

Rashid Ali Abdallah

Africa Energy Commission

Executive Director

Rashid Ali Abdallah has been executive director of the African Energy Commission (AFREC) since November 2018. He has more than 20 years of experience in energy, sustainable development and environmental policy at national, regional and continental level. Prior to joining AFREC, Abdallah served as the Head of the Energy Division within the African Union Commission’s Department of Infrastructure and Energy.

In his current role, Abdallah spearheads and leads the delivery of AFREC’s work programmes and strategy, in cooperation with the African Union Commission and African member states, based on continental, regional and national priorities.

A Sudanese national, Abdallah has bachelor’s degrees in mechanical engineering (from the University of Khartoum) and project management (from the University of Birmingham, UK) and a Post Graduate Diploma in energy engineering from Khartoum University.

Filip Lefebre

Filip Lefebre

VITO

Urban Climate Service Manager

Filip Lefebre is a business developer and project manager in VITO’s Environmental Modelling business unit’s Climate Service team. This team delivers innovative, sustainable and scientifically sound products and services to better manage, predict and control our shared natural resources (air, water, land, soil, eco-systems), based on computer modelling and information technology. It specialises in the processing of past, present and future climate data into information and services suitable for use by customer-oriented organisations. The Climate Service Team’s expertise covers urban climate services as well as climate health, biodiversity and agriculture services.

Filip has a PhD in physics of regional climate modelling of the Greenland ice sheet (2001) from the Catholic University of Louvain.

Cassius Chiwambo

Cassius Chiwambo

Government of Malawi

Director Ministry of Energy

Cassius Chiwambo is a Director at Ministry of Energy in Malawi. He has vast experience in Petroleum and Minerals. Cassius has both Technical as well as Legal skills having done Masters of Mining at Curtin University in Western Australia, Energy and Mineral Law and Policy at Dundee University in Scotland. He is a final year PhD Student pursuing Energy and Petroleum Law at the same institution.

He worked as an Acting Commissioner of Petroleum in Malawi from 2016 to June, 2020 before before appointed as a Director of Energy in July, 2020.

Cassius Chiwambo is the brain behind Malawi’s Upstream Petroleum Sector, having promoted the exploration of actual fuels and also Renewable Sources of Energy from Geothermal and others.

He is currently championing the realization of 1000 MW to the National Grid in 4 years (From 2021 to 2024), which is an Industrial-Economical vision made by His Excellency Dr. Lazarus Mac Cathy Chakwera, the State President of Malawi and supported by Malawi’s National Planing Commission (NPC) and the Agenda 2063 on Universal Access to Electricity.

Thematic plenary session
Enablers and hurdles for accelerating NDC implementation
15:45 - 17:15
Dubai Exhibition Centre

Climate, Energy

×

Climate Energy

Thematic plenary session

Enablers and hurdles for accelerating NDC implementation

25/10/2021, 15:45 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

13:45 - 15:15 CEST/SAST (Brussels, Cape Town)

12:45 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

07:45 - 09:15 EDT (New York)

20:45 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

19:45 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

17:15 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

08:45 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Dubai Exhibition Centre & online

Join us online >

Join us in Dubai >

Nationally determined contributions (NDCs) are at the heart of the Paris Agreement and the attainment of long-term climate goals. They embody each country’s efforts to reduce national emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Together, these actions will determine whether the world achieves the Agreement’s aims, including reversing the rise of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as soon as possible and following through with rapid reduction.

This session will explore the challenges related to using NDCs as a mechanism for achieving climate goals and associated SDGs. As a starting point, we need to identify the hurdles and enablers for implementing them, while building national and regional capacity. The UNFCC Technical Committee’s background paper on Mapping Barriers and Enabling Environments in Technology Needs Assessments, Nationally Determined Contributions, and Technical Assistance of the Climate Technology Centre and Network (published September 2018) summarises a detailed analysis which will form this session’s basis for discussion.

Chaired by

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN)

Director

Rose Mwebaza is the Director of the CTCN and brings 20 years’ experience providing policy advice on a wide range of climate change, environment and sustainable development issues. She has previously served as Chief Natural Resources Officer at the African Development Bank and held leadership positions within the UN Development Programme. Mwebaza was a Lecturer at Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, for 10 years, serving as the Head of Department for Commercial Law and Deputy Dean of the Law School.

Mwebaza holds a PhD in environment and natural resource governance from Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, a master’s degree in international comparative law (with a Certificate of Academic Excellence) from the University of Florida, U.S.A and a bachelor’s degree in law (LL.B, Hons.) from Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

Introductory video: the vision of G-STIC

Opening remarks

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN)

Director

Rose Mwebaza is the Director of the CTCN and brings 20 years’ experience providing policy advice on a wide range of climate change, environment and sustainable development issues. She has previously served as Chief Natural Resources Officer at the African Development Bank and held leadership positions within the UN Development Programme. Mwebaza was a Lecturer at Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, for 10 years, serving as the Head of Department for Commercial Law and Deputy Dean of the Law School.

Mwebaza holds a PhD in environment and natural resource governance from Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, a master’s degree in international comparative law (with a Certificate of Academic Excellence) from the University of Florida, U.S.A and a bachelor’s degree in law (LL.B, Hons.) from Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

Keynote speech

Jairam  Ramesh

H.E. Jairam Ramesh

Former India Minister of Environment

Member of Parliament (Rajya Sabha)

Jairam Ramesh is a well-known economist, government official and senior pioneer of the Indian National Congress. He is a member of parliament representing Andhra Pradesh state, a position he has held since June 2004.

In 2011, Jairam Ramesh was elevated to the Union Council of Ministers of India and appointed Minister of Rural Development and Minister of the new Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation. Between May 2009 and July 2011, he was Minister of State at the Ministry of Environment and Forests.

Ramesh has been a columnist for The Business Standard, Business Today, The Telegraph, The Times and India Today, and has also anchored a number of popular television programmes on business and the economy. In addition, Jairam Ramesh is the author of the books: “Making Sense of Chindia: Reflections on China and India” (2005), “Mobilising Technology for World Development” (Co-editor, 1979), “To the Brink and Back: India’s 1991 Story” (2015) and “Old History, New Geography” (2016).

Presentation

Insights on the implementation of NDCs in Malawi

Malawi has an existing climate change institutional arrangement that is instrumental to implementation of climate change interventions. The country has policy frameworks that are enablers for implementation of the NDC. For instance, NDC is aligned to the National Climate Change Management Policy (NCCMP) and the Malawi Growth and Development Strategy (MGDS III). The NDC is also aligned to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the international level and the Malawi Vision 2063 at the national level. Hurdles in implementation of NDC include challenges in data flows/sharing which impedes NDC implementation tracking.

Cassius Chiwambo

Cassius Chiwambo

Government of Malawi

Director Department of Energy

Cassius Chiwambo is a Director at Ministry of Energy in Malawi. He has vast experience in Petroleum and Minerals. Cassius has both Technical as well as Legal skills having done Masters of Mining at Curtin University in Western Australia, Energy and Mineral Law and Policy at Dundee University in Scotland. He a final year PhD Student pursuing Energy and Petroleum Law at the same institution. He worked as an Acting Commissioner of Petroleum in Malawi from 2016 to June, 2020 before before appointed as a Director of Energy in July, 2020.

Cassius Chiwambo is the brain behind Malawi’s Upstream Petroleum Sector, having promoted the exploration of actual fuels and also Renewable Sources of Energy from Geothermal and others. He is currently championing the realization of 1000 MW to the National Grid in 4 years (From 2021 to 2024), which is an Industrial-Economical vision made by His Excellency Dr. Lazarus Mac Cathy Chakwera, the State President of Malawi and supported by Malawi’s National Planing Commission (NPC) and the Agenda 2063 on Universal Access to Electricity.

Presentation

Designing a funding framework for the impacts of slow-onset climate change – Insights from recent coastal retreat experiences

Effective management of slow-onset impacts such as coastal erosion, desertification and sea level rise, and their often-transformative impacts on communities and countries, has remained relatively unexplored in terms of policy and finance responses. Drawing on relevant global experience, this talk investigates recent approaches to planned relocation, as one possible response to climate change impacts, and considers principles to inform the design of a fair and effective funding system. Relevant principles include minimising long-term societal costs, pursuing inter-generational equity, integrating funding with broader sustainable development objectives and ensuring a high degree of transparency and accountability for the use of public funds.

Swenja Surminski

Swenja Surminski

Climate Change & the Environment

Deputy Director

Swenja Surminski is Deputy Director and Head of Adaptation Research at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, which is part of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Here, she oversees social science research projects on climate adaptation, climate change Loss and Damage and disaster risk finance, with a geographic scope ranging from the UK to developing countries.

Swenja’s research investigates climate risk management and resilience strategies. It focusses on public policies, financial instruments and individual behaviour through a mix of inter-disciplinary approaches, integrating concepts from geography, climate science, economics and governance studies.

Prior to joining LSE in 2010, Swenja spent more than ten years in the insurance industry working on climate and risks management, holding roles at companies such as Munich Re, Marsh Mc Lennon and the Association of British Insurers. Swenja was a Fulbright Scholar in the US, studying Ecological Economics and International Relations at the University of New Hampshire. She received a PhD in political science from Hamburg University for her work on ‘Climate Change and the Insurance Industry’ in 2002.

Presentation

Blue-green measures for climate adaptation

The Flanders Climate Adaptation Plan focuses on implementing nature-based solutions (NBS) to tackle the impacts of climate change. It includes a calculation of the costs of its proposed actions and explores the possibilities for synergies between adaptation and mitigation measures.

This presentation will look at the most important NBS measures for dealing with drought problems and the importance of the Blue Deal investments. How these link with the new EU Adaptation Strategy and international cooperation will also be addressed, along with the importance of a global approach to the climate change, knowledge exchange and mutual support.

Griet  Verstraeten

Griet Verstraeten

Department of Environment

Policy Officer Climate Adaptation

Griet Verstraeten works as a policy advisor on climate change adaptation in the Flemish Government Department of Environment and Spatial Development. She is also the lead expert for Belgium on the European Adaptation Strategy.

In her role as policy advisor, Griet coordinates the work on local policy for Flanders carried out by the Flemish Task Force on Climate Change Adaptation and representatives from other Flemish Government departments (including agriculture and fisheries, mobility and infrastructure, economy and innovation, health, nature and forestry, environment, water, spatial planning). She is responsible for the development and implementation of the Flemish Plan on Climate Change Adaptation and for the communication, knowledge exchange and awareness-raising associated with it.

Griet has a master’s degree in bioscience engineering (land and forest management) from KU Leuven, a master’s degree in urban planning from the University of Antwerp and over 20 years’ experience in spatial planning, environmental policy, sustainable development and international cooperation. Verstraeten is an expert in international and European policies on climate change adaptation, with specific expertise on the implementation of nature-based solutions.

Griet Verstraeten represents the Flemish Government in the Belgian national working group on climate change adaptation (under the national climate commission) and is an active member of Working Group VI, the network on climate change adaptation under DG Climate.

Presentation

Innovative financing as a catalyst for climate technology transfer

Successful deployment and sustainable use of climate technology are dependent on overcoming a number of barriers during the technology life cycle. The “valley of death”, the financing gap between the R&D and commercialisation phases, is often referred to when discussing the obstacles to technology transfer. The valley of death is especially relevant in developing countries. Climate technologies, even those which have been proven in the context of developed countries, still have financial risks in the context of developing countries which hinder the leveraging of investment.

As the world strives to limit the increase in global temperature to under 1.5° Celsius, climate technology is key for enabling developing countries to face the impact of the rapidly changing climate and make the transition to low carbon development. Innovative approaches for financing are an essential catalyst for deploying climate technology in these countries. A number of GTC project cases where this has successfully been done will be presented. These will include key approaches such as: customising the financing model with consideration to technology types and application environment, utilising public finance (such as bilateral ODA fund) for technology demonstration and pilot projects to reduce the investment risks of unproven technologies, and strengthening developing countries’ readiness to absorb climate finance.

Rywon Yang

Rywon Yang

Green Technology Center

Senior Researcher

Rywon Yang is a senior researcher in the Climate Technology Cooperation Division of the Green Technology Center—Korea. She has two main areas of research. One is linkages between technology and finance in climate change. The other is legal and regulatory aspects of climate technology transfer in developing countries.

Rywon Yang has developed GCF projects (concept notes, readiness proposals) and implemented CTCN technical assistance projects on both adaptation and mitigation technologies for countries such as Bangladesh, Cambodia and Kenya. Previous to this, she worked for the Republic of Korea’s Ministry of Justice as a legal specialist. She participated in UNFCCC negotiations as a member of the Korean delegation, and examined the legal implications of negotiation texts for documents such as the Paris Agreement.

Rywon has also led several legal technical assistance projects for revising legal and institutional frameworks, as well as organised capacity building trainings for legal professionals from developing countries, namely Laos, Paraguay and Papua New Guinea. She earned her master’s in law from University Pantheon-Sorbonne Paris I in France.

Presentation

Key findings of the deep dive session on data scarcity

While NDCs embody countries’ efforts to adapt to the impacts of climate change, mitigating it by reducing GHG emissions remains a critical part of many policies (and SDG13). Verifiable data is crucial for determining efficient strategies and is pivotal for updating NDCs, as well as monitoring and reporting on implementation and progress. However, it is not available in many areas. The deep dive session zoomed in on solutions for overcoming data scarcity and focus on capacity building needs.

Leen Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy and Built Environment

Leen Govaerts holds a master’s degree in business engineering and an executive MBA. Having begun her career researching low carbon mobility at the VITO Research Institute for Sustainable Development, she is currently leading VITO EnergyVille’s research unit for Smart Energy and Built Environment, which deals with sustainable energy and urban sustainability. With an approach based around living labs, key research areas are long-term energy strategies and policy, energy district design and sustainable building concepts.

Leen is an executive committee member for EnergyVille, an association of 400 researchers in sustainable energy and cities from VITO, KU Leuven, Imec and Hasselt University. She is the chairperson of BERA – Belgian Energy Research Alliance – and a member of the executive committee of EERA, the European Energy Research Alliance. She is involved in several international networks and has coordinated a number of European research consortia. Govaerts is also a recognised expert acting on behalf of the Flemish Government evaluating energy and sustainability aspects in relation to renewal of urban districts.

Q&A and panel discussion

Cassius Chiwambo

Cassius Chiwambo

Government of Malawi

Director Department of Energy

Cassius Chiwambo is a Director at Ministry of Energy in Malawi. He has vast experience in Petroleum and Minerals. Cassius has both Technical as well as Legal skills having done Masters of Mining at Curtin University in Western Australia, Energy and Mineral Law and Policy at Dundee University in Scotland. He a final year PhD Student pursuing Energy and Petroleum Law at the same institution. He worked as an Acting Commissioner of Petroleum in Malawi from 2016 to June, 2020 before before appointed as a Director of Energy in July, 2020.

Cassius Chiwambo is the brain behind Malawi’s Upstream Petroleum Sector, having promoted the exploration of actual fuels and also Renewable Sources of Energy from Geothermal and others. He is currently championing the realization of 1000 MW to the National Grid in 4 years (From 2021 to 2024), which is an Industrial-Economical vision made by His Excellency Dr. Lazarus Mac Cathy Chakwera, the State President of Malawi and supported by Malawi’s National Planing Commission (NPC) and the Agenda 2063 on Universal Access to Electricity.

Griet  Verstraeten

Griet Verstraeten

Department of Environment

Policy Officer Climate Adaptation

Griet Verstraeten works as a policy advisor on climate change adaptation in the Flemish Government Department of Environment and Spatial Development. She is also the lead expert for Belgium on the European Adaptation Strategy.

In her role as policy advisor, Griet coordinates the work on local policy for Flanders carried out by the Flemish Task Force on Climate Change Adaptation and representatives from other Flemish Government departments (including agriculture and fisheries, mobility and infrastructure, economy and innovation, health, nature and forestry, environment, water, spatial planning). She is responsible for the development and implementation of the Flemish Plan on Climate Change Adaptation and for the communication, knowledge exchange and awareness-raising associated with it.

Griet has a master’s degree in bioscience engineering (land and forest management) from KU Leuven, a master’s degree in urban planning from the University of Antwerp and over 20 years’ experience in spatial planning, environmental policy, sustainable development and international cooperation. Verstraeten is an expert in international and European policies on climate change adaptation, with specific expertise on the implementation of nature-based solutions.

Griet Verstraeten represents the Flemish Government in the Belgian national working group on climate change adaptation (under the national climate commission) and is an active member of Working Group VI, the network on climate change adaptation under DG Climate.

Leen Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy and Built Environment

Leen Govaerts holds a master’s degree in business engineering and an executive MBA. Having begun her career researching low carbon mobility at the VITO Research Institute for Sustainable Development, she is currently leading VITO EnergyVille’s research unit for Smart Energy and Built Environment, which deals with sustainable energy and urban sustainability. With an approach based around living labs, key research areas are long-term energy strategies and policy, energy district design and sustainable building concepts.

Leen is an executive committee member for EnergyVille, an association of 400 researchers in sustainable energy and cities from VITO, KU Leuven, Imec and Hasselt University. She is the chairperson of BERA – Belgian Energy Research Alliance – and a member of the executive committee of EERA, the European Energy Research Alliance. She is involved in several international networks and has coordinated a number of European research consortia. Govaerts is also a recognised expert acting on behalf of the Flemish Government evaluating energy and sustainability aspects in relation to renewal of urban districts.

Closing remarks

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN)

Director

Rose Mwebaza is the Director of the CTCN and brings 20 years’ experience providing policy advice on a wide range of climate change, environment and sustainable development issues. She has previously served as Chief Natural Resources Officer at the African Development Bank and held leadership positions within the UN Development Programme. Mwebaza was a Lecturer at Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, for 10 years, serving as the Head of Department for Commercial Law and Deputy Dean of the Law School.

Mwebaza holds a PhD in environment and natural resource governance from Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, a master’s degree in international comparative law (with a Certificate of Academic Excellence) from the University of Florida, U.S.A and a bachelor’s degree in law (LL.B, Hons.) from Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

26 October 2021

Workshop
The democratisation of technology: paving the way towards a desirable 2050 future by understanding our younger generation’s aspirations
09:30 - 13:00
Dubai Exhibition Centre (by invitation only)

Circular Economy, Climate, ICT, Entrepreneurship

×

Circular Economy Climate ICT Entrepreneurship

Workshop

The democratisation of technology: paving the way towards a desirable 2050 future by understanding our younger generation’s aspirations

26/10/2021, 09:30 - 13:00 GST (Dubai)

07:30 - 11:00 CEST/SAST (Brussels, Cape Town)

06:30 - 10:00 WAT (Nigeria)

01:30 - 05:00 EDT (New York)

14:30 - 18:00 KST (Seoul)

13:30 - 17:00 CST (Beijing)

11:00 - 14:30 IST (New Delhi)

02:30 - 06:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Dubai Exhibition Centre (by invitation only)

It takes up to 25 years, which is a generation, to transform an industrial sector and its associated value chains. Attaining a desirable sustainable future by 2050 means decisions, action and experimentation around the “new sustainable normal” need to take place now.

In partnership with the Resilience Frontiers Initiative, Zayed University, G-STIC, VITO and 3 ideas B.V., this workshop will use methodology developed by the Resilience Frontiers Initiative together with foresight provided by 4CF to frame a regional case study around date palm oasis ecosystems. A group of students from Zayed University will be engaged to shed light on their social aspirations for the future in the context of natural resources, human settlements, circular economy, new materials, and frontier technologies.

The students, in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team of experts, will be also asked to apply the values, principles and a worldview associated with indigenous networks and their information management systems to the assimilation of frontier technologies, including blockchain.

Facilitated by

Norbert  Kolos

Norbert Kolos

4CF Sp. z o.o.

Managing partner

Norbert Kolos is a managing partner of 4CF. For over a decade, he has headed its analytical team’s contributions to numerous studies and strategies for business, governmental bodies and international institutions, providing foresight, socio-economic and regulatory impact assessments. Norbert has also examined the future of manufacturing and related business (in the packaging, automotive and technology sectors’ models) under Industry 4.0.

In recent years, Norbert has led consulting projects in strategic planning for Norwegian government agencies such as Jernbaneverket, Innovasjon Norge and Kystverket, for the Polish Ministry of Investments and Development, and others. He has conducted workshops and training sessions for decision makers of large corporations and institutions.

Norbert Kolos is currently the chair of the Polish node of The Millennium Project, an international foresight think-tank based in Washington, and a member of the World Future Society. He also teaches strategic foresight at the Naval Academy in Gdynia, having earned master’s degrees in both economics and management at the University of Warsaw.

Kacper  Nosarzewski

Kacper Nosarzewski

4CF Sp. z o.o.

Partner

Kacper Nosarzewski is a partner at 4CF and a board member of the Polish Society for Futures Studies. As a NATO expert, he is an author of methodologies and facilitator of foresight projects for civilian and military clients. Kacper advises on strategic foresight enterprises and international institutions, such as UNESCO and UNDP. He led the Scenarios of National Development 2050 project for the Polish Ministry of Infrastructure and Development.

Kacper has also managed projects for medium and large companies and government agencies around the world in the high-tech, food & beverage, financial, logistics and defense industries. These include the Polish and Dutch Ministries of Defense, Brazilian mining corporations, the Republic of Colombia’s Ministry of Labour, Polish FMCG companies and government agencies in Tunisia and Norway.

He is a member of the Polish branch of The Millennium Project – the world’s largest foresight think tank – and a member of the World Future Society, as well as being the author of various scientific articles, workshops and media commentaries on the future of industries, cities and companies.

Kacper Nosarzewski currently teaches foresight at the Naval Academy, AGH University of Science and Technology, and has a seminar on future cities at the Faculty of Geography and Regional Studies, University of Warsaw. He is a graduate of the University of Warsaw and an alumnus of the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Programme.

Ibon  Zugasti Gorostidi

Ibon Zugasti Gorostidi

Prospektiker - Millennium Project

Director

Ibon Zugasti is an International Project Manager at LKS Cooperative (the Management Consulting Division of MONDRAGON Corporation), a Board Member of the Millennium Project Global Futures Think Tank, a Member of the Board of Foresight Europe Network – FEN, Deputy Director of the Foresight Iberoamerican Network – RIBER and Associate Fellow of the World Academy of Art and Science. Ibon is also the Managing Partner/Director in PROSPEKTIKER – European Institute for Futures Studies and Strategy and a member of the PREPARE Network.

Since 1999, Ibon has led several high-impact consultancy and research projects in fields such as foresight, regional sustainable development, labour & training and energy for different Governments around the world (including USA, Canada, UK, Colombia, Uruguay) and cities (including Montreal, Preston, New York City) and corporations (including Repsol, Telefonica, Iberdrola, Guggenheim, MONDRAGON). He has also advised the Committee of the Regions of the EU about the launching of a European Platform on Territorial Foresight. In the USA, Ibon advises the Bronx Cooperative Development Initiative (BCDI) in New York City and collaborates closely with the nationwide 1worker1vote movement.

Ibon has co-authored several publications such as “The Future of Business Organizations and Cooperatives” (Millennium Project), “An initial assessment of territorial forward planning/foresight projects in the European Union” (Committee of the Regions of the EU), “The Future of Work and Technology 2050” (Millennium Project) and related articles such as “Why the U.S. Needs More Worker-Owned Companies” (Harvard Business Review) and “Mondragon: Maintaining Resilience through Cooperative Strategies” (Oxford University). He also contributes to the Millennium Project’s annual “State of the Future” publication.

Ibon attained his bachelor’s degree in business administration and his master’s in strategic management at the University of Deusto (Spain) and Marquette University (USA). He has taught strategic and cooperative management and foresight at international level at many universities and seminars (including Oxford University, TEC Monterrey, Singularity University and Yonsei University).

Partners and co-creators

Youssef  Nassef

Youssef Nassef

UNFCCC

Director Adaptation

Youssef Nassef leads the work on adaptation to climate change under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. He has 30 years of experience in diplomacy and international environmental policy and is a seconded diplomat from the Egyptian Foreign Service.

While assuming progressively higher levels of leadership at the UNFCCC, he led UNFCCC support for a number of on-going initiatives on adaptation. These include the inception of National Adaptation Programme of Action, National Adaptation Plans, the Nairobi Work Programme (an international knowledge hub for impacts, vulnerability and adaptation) and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage.

Youssef holds a doctorate in international technology policy and management and a master’s degree in international environmental policy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, as well as a master’s degree in Middle East studies and a bachelor’s degree in computer science and physics from the American University in Cairo.

Sandra Piesik

Sandra Piesik

3 Ideas B.V.

Director

Sandra Piesik is an award-winning architect, author and researcher specialising in the implementation of global sustainable legislation, nature-based solutions and traditional knowledge adaptation. She is the founder of 3 ideas B.V. Amsterdam based consultancy, a senior consultant to UN-HABITAT on Urban and Rural Linkages at the Urban Practices Branch, and a former Policy Support Consultant on Rural – Urban Dynamics to UNCCD. Her diverse global engagements range from international lectures, judging of the competitions, nominator of awards, and evaluation of R&D projects for the European Union.

She is a stakeholder and network member of several UN organisations including UNFCCC: The Resilience Frontiers, the Nairobi Work Programme (NWP), the Paris Committee on Capacity Building (PCCB) and Climate and Technology Centre & Network (CTCN).

Her published work includes Arish: Palm-Leaf Architecture (published by: Thames & Hudson in 2012), she is also the general editor of the encyclopaedia, HABITAT: Vernacular Architecture for a Changing Planet (published by: Thames & Hudson, Abrams Books, Flammarion, Editions Detail and Blume in 2017).

Marco  Sosa

Marco Sosa

Zayed University

Associate Professor and Chair of Design at CACE

Marco Sosa is an Architect (RIBA), Associate Professor and Chair of Design at the College of Arts and Creative Enterprises, Zayed University, Abu Dhabi. He holds a bachelor’s degree (Hons) and postgraduate diploma in Architecture, as well as a master’s in Architecture of Rapid Change and Scarce Resources from the London Metropolitan University. In 2012, Sosa published a photography book about the oldest functional mosque in the UAE. He has also designed, participated in and curated exhibitions, nationally and internationally.

In 2014, Marco was appointed Head of Design to the curatorial team for the First National UAE Pavilion at the 14th International Architecture Exhibition, Venice Biennale. Curated by Rem Koolhaas, this exhibition and its catalogue featured many of Sosa’s photographs. Sosa is interested in materials and their presence as space forming mediums that add materiality to a “place”, together with how to integrate digital fabrication techniques in the studio for Interior design learning.

Lina  Ahmad

Lina Ahmad

Zayed University

Associate Professor at CACE

Lina Ahmad is currently employed as an Associate Professor and Assistant Chair at the College of Arts and Creative Enterprises, Zayed University, Abu Dhabi. Ahmad holds a master’s degree (MArch) from the Architectural Association in London. She has over 10 years of professional experience as an architect working across different sectors and project stages.

Ahmad’s work has been exhibited extensively, including at the UAE’s National Pavilion at the 14th International Architecture Exhibition, Venice Biennale.

In 2015, she published a book titled “Cellular ‘Network’ City” which presents an investigation into the realm of algorithmic architectural design.

Lina’s work has been published and presented at various conferences around the world. She is passionate about modern heritage and is an advocate of digital fabrication technology, the concept of “design by making” in the design studio and its impact in regional higher education and the UAE creative industry.

Technical expert

Stan  Chen

Stan Chen

RecycleGO

CEO & Co-Founder

An eco-entrepreneur, Stan’s passion for sustainability along with 20+ years of experience in the recycling industry has provided the knowledge needed to design and develop ever-innovative solutions for the recycling industry, the economy, and the environment.

Deep dive session
Ensuring a climate resilient recovery after COVID-19 (hosted by CTCN)
11:30 - 13:00

Climate

×

Climate

Deep dive session

Ensuring a climate resilient recovery after COVID-19 (hosted by CTCN)

26/10/2021, 11:30 - 13:00 GST (Dubai)

09:30 - 11:00 CEST/SAST (Brussels, Cape Town)

08:30 - 10:00 WAT (Nigeria)

03:30 - 05:00 EDT (New York)

16:30 - 18:00 KST (Seoul)

15:30 - 17:00 CST (Beijing)

13:00 - 14:30 IST (New Delhi)

04:30 - 06:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Online

Join us online >

The transition to clean energy presents countries with a range of challenges. This session will look at case studies and discuss a wide range of issues concerning decarbonisation plans and roadmaps, as well as integrating circularity into supply chains. It will also explore new and innovative business models and nature-based solutions. Questions will be raised about the considerations which have to be taken into account when investing in and implementing climate resilience actions. Answers will be sought for how climate resilience be strengthened and incorporated into countries’ planning.

Welcome

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN)

Director

Rose Mwebaza is the Director of the CTCN and brings 20 years’ experience providing policy advice on a wide range of climate change, environment and sustainable development issues. She has previously served as Chief Natural Resources Officer at the African Development Bank and held leadership positions within the UN Development Programme. Mwebaza was a Lecturer at Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, for 10 years, serving as the Head of Department for Commercial Law and Deputy Dean of the Law School.

Mwebaza holds a PhD in environment and natural resource governance from Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, a master’s degree in international comparative law (with a Certificate of Academic Excellence) from the University of Florida, U.S.A and a bachelor’s degree in law (LL.B, Hons.) from Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

Introduction: the CTCN report

Sergio La Motta

Sergio La Motta

Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN)

Advisory Board

Sergio La Motta is a member of the Advisory Board of the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN). He is also the Italian representative in the steering committee of Low Carbon Societies Research Network (LCS-RNet) and a member of the Italian National Competent Authority for the implementation of the Emission Trading System (ETS).

Sergio has a degree in physics from the University of Pisa. He began his professional career in the photovoltaic laboratory at ENEA and has been a member of the Italian negotiation team for climate issues since 1997.

Presentation

Developing a circular economy at local level in Costa Rica

This presentation will share CTCN’s experience of supporting a local government (Municipality of Turrialba) in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from municipal waste. The work included incorporating the circular economy concept into territorial and financial planning tools, so the municipality can contribute to achieving Costa Rica’s Nationally Determined Contribution and climate policy goals.

Leida Mercado

Leida Mercado

CATIE

Leader Development Economy and Environment Research Program

Since 2013, Leida Mercado has held the position of Professor at the Tropical Agricultural and Higher Education Center (CATIE), as well as senior researcher for the Environment for Development Initiative (EfD). Leida has more than 20 years of experience providing policy advice on issues related to sustainable development, climate change, and the use of economics to improve environmental performance.

Prior to working at CATIE, Mercado worked for 12 years as an environmental economics adviser at the United Nations Development Program and as environmental officer in the Venezuelan Ministry of the Environment. She has provided consultancy work for FAO, the World Bank, and the Inter-American Development Bank.

Mercado has published various articles in high impact scientific journals, as well as technical reports and policy briefs aimed at conveying scientific data to support policymaking. Since 2018, she has been working on issues related to the circular economy.

Mercado holds a PhD in Environment and Economics and a Master’s degree in International Agriculture from Cornell University, NY, U.S.A; as well as an engineering degree in Agriculture from the Central University of Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela.

Presentation

Developing a national policy for deploying and scaling up e-mobility in Ghana

This presentation looks at a case where CTCN is assisting decarbonisation of the transport sector, by helping Ghana to assess its market readiness for deploying electric vehicles and draft the national policy on e-mobility. This includes conducting a detailed feasibility study, capacity building and raising awareness among relevant stakeholders.

Subash Dhar

Subash Dhar

UNEP DTU Partnership

Senior Economist

Subash is a Senior Economist at UNEP DTU Partnership and a Senior Fellow at the Global Centre for Environment and Energy, Ahmedabad University. He is a Lead Author for the Transport Chapter in the ongoing sixth assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and was a contributing author for the fifth assessment of the IPCC. His research interests include sustainable urban transport, low carbon development in developing countries, technology transfer and climate change and he has published a number of peer-reviewed papers on these topics.

He has extensive experience in implementing projects and proposal development. He was the project manager for the BMU funded Promoting Low Carbon Transport project in India and has been the Regional Coordinator for Asia within the Technology Needs Assessment project. He has experience of working with most countries within Asia Pacific region. He has been involved in promoting electric mobility in Asian cities as a means for reducing air pollution, improving access and reducing CO2 emissions.

He has authored a number of guidebooks/toolkits for capacity building in the area of technology transfer and low carbon transport including the UN Environment toolkit for Low Carbon Mobility Planning for cities. He has also helped the Government of India in revising their ‘Comprehensive Mobility Plan – A toolkit’ for the Indian cities. Subash holds a doctoral degree from Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad.

Presentation

Ecosystem-based adaptation and Power to Gas roadmap in Laos

This presentation comprises of two cases. The first shows how CTCN supported Laos in carrying out a climate vulnerability assessment, with nature-based adaptation in six cities. This resulted in a TA-leveraged fund in form of a GCF proposal of USD 11.5 million (USD 10 million from GCF + In kind support from Laos Government). The second case looks at Laos’s Power to Gas roadmap, which is one of the region’s very first projects for transitioning towards green hydrogen and carbon capture.

Khampasong Khamvene

Khampasong Khamvene

MONRE

Technical Officer Department of Climate Change

He is Technical Officer, Department of Climate Change, MONRE. He is responsible for assisting in the field of climate change adaptation and climate vulnerability assessment. Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment is the National Designated Entity for Laos.

Q&A

Panel discussion

Panel debate: role of climate technology in ensuring climate resilient recovery from COVID-19

Diala Hawila

Diala Hawila

International Renewable Energy Agency

Programme Officer

Diala has worked on various topics related to policy assessment, such as the study on renewable energy auctions “Analysing 2016 and Renewable Energy Auctions: A Guide to Design”, as well as socio-economic impacts of renewable energy via projects such as “Renewable Energy Benefits: Leveraging Local Capacity of solar PV and onshore wind”. Diala is one of the authors of IRENA’s regional market analysis on Southeast Asia. She obtained her master’s degree in engineering systems and management, focusing on sustainability and renewable energy, from the Masdar Institute in Abu Dhabi. Prior to that, she was a consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers, providing advisory services to government entities in fields such as energy and waste management.

Maija Bertule

Maija Bertule

UNEP-DHI Centre on Water & Environment

Senior Technical Advisor

Originally from Latvia, Maija is now based in Denmark and has been part of the UNEP-DHI Centre team for more than 6 years. She has a degree in international development and environmental planning. Her work over recent years has focused on supporting global monitoring and reporting of SDG 6, climate change adaptation, green infrastructure and strategic science, and indicator use for improved water management. Maija is part of the core team at the UNEP-DHI Centre, as well as the SDG indicator 6.5.1 team in UNEP, supporting countries in their reporting on integrated water resources management implementation.

Matthew  Kennedy

Matthew Kennedy

CTCN

Advisory Board Member

Matthew has 20 years of experience in the fields of sustainable energy, development, climate change mitigation & adaptation, climate finance, mobility, innovation management and natural resource management. He’s currently leading Arup’s climate, carbon services and sustainability workstreams across Europe. This includes delivering carbon, environment and climate initiatives within infrastructure, buildings and cities, and shaping Arup’s decarbonisation roadmap aligned to a science-based target approach.

Kennedy has engaged with the private sector on sustainable energy, transport and climate mitigation. He has also applied knowledge of climate financing architecture and mainstreaming climate resilience to multiple development sectors, and delivered technology needs assessments and market transformation measures in LDCs across Africa, South East Asia and the Middle East. He has collaborative experience of international finance organisations, development agencies, scientific and technical bodies, private sector entities, developing country counterparts, and civil society organisations.

Closing

Frans Snijkers

Frans Snijkers

VITO

Programme Director G-STIC

Frans Snijkers, Director of Cleantech Flanders and Programme Director of G-STIC, holds a bachelor’s degree in sciences from Hasselt University and a master’s degree in sciences (chemistry), from the Catholic University of Leuven.

Frans Snijkers previously worked at Philips (now Philips Electronics nv.) for 14 years. He began his career as a scientific collaborator in research on thermionic cathodes, cathode ray tubes and innovative display technologies at the Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. This was followed by a 9-year period as a project manager in product and process development at Philips Display Components in Eindhoven.

After 14 years in industrial R&D, Snijkers became a researcher/project leader and later team leader of the Ceramic Materials and Powder Metallurgy team at the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO).

In addition to project acquisition, he has played an active part in several international (mainly European) projects and projects for Flemish companies. He has organised and co-organised conferences, supervised jointly doctoral projects and is the author or co-author of about 100 scientific papers published in international journals and about a dozen patents.

Frans Snijkers represents VITO on the Board of Directors of VLOOT, the Flemish umbrella organisation for technology providers.

Deep dive session
Flemish ports as a breeding ground for low CO2 emission technologies
14:00 - 15:30
Belgian Pavilion

Climate, Energy

×

Climate Energy

Deep dive session

Flemish ports as a breeding ground for low CO2 emission technologies

26/10/2021, 14:00 - 15:30 GST (Dubai)

12:00 - 13:30 CEST/SAST (Brussels, Cape Town)

11:00 - 12:30 WAT (Nigeria)

06:00 - 07:30 EDT (New York)

19:00 - 20:30 KST (Seoul)

18:00 - 19:30 CST (Beijing)

15:30 - 17:00 IST (New Delhi)

07:00 - 08:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Belgian Pavilion & online

Join us online >

Join us in Dubai >

Seaports are not only transhipment hubs for goods. They are also energy hubs which play both a direct role in reducing CO2 emissions and an indirect one by capturing CO2 from the industrial players based in them and using it as raw material for other industries. Alongside this, the vehicles and vessels which operate in ports are becoming greener, which is significantly contributing to CO2 emission reduction. Ports thereby play a pioneering role in acting as a catalyst for stimulating the companies that use them to make their own ecosystems greener.

Chaired by

Walter Eevers

Walter Eevers

VITO

Director of Research & Development

Walter Eevers is Director of Research & Development at VITO, Belgium. After obtaining his PhD in electrically conductive polymers from Antwerp University, he joined Nitto Europe where he was responsible for R&D and business development until becoming General Manager of Techno-Marketing. Walter became involved in global technology sourcing and marketing by setting up multiple collaborations with universities and research institutes.

In 2012, Eevers helped found Nitto Denko Europe Technical Centre in Lausanne as a company dedicated to research activities for medical devices. Eevers is also an external Expert and Vice Chair for the EU Commission, Conacyt (Mexico) and the Qatar Foundation for innovation programmes and projects. He is Vice-President of CO2 Value Europe, an industry association promoting and stimulating CCU.

Eevers is also Chairman of the Board of EnergyVille, the collaboration between KU Leuven, University of Hasselt, IMEC and VITO for sustainable energy research. In his current position, he has stimulated several spinoffs from VITO and held board positions in them. As a visiting professor at University of Antwerp for polymer chemistry, he is guiding research activities in the field of biobased polymer developments.

 

Introduction

Annick  De Ridder

Annick De Ridder

Port of Antwerp

Chairman of the board of directors

Presentation

Luc  Arnouts

Luc Arnouts

Port of Antwerp

Director International Relations & Networks

Since obtaining his master’s degrees in law from the University of Antwerp and in general management from the University of Ghent, Luc Arnouts has continually been active in the port and logistics sector. His career and gaining of operational experience in stevedoring, warehousing and ocean freight forwarding began at the logistics company Group Katoennatie. From there, he moved to SGS-Group Belgium, where he was General Manager of SGS-Van Bree, a member of the Central Management Committee and the Strategic Committee, and in charge of SGS’s logistics and port handling business in Belgium. In 2000, Arnouts joined the leading European airport handling company Aviapartner as VP of Cargo Handling Europe and a member of its Central Board.

In 2007, Luc Arnouts moved to the Antwerp Port Authority as its Chief Commercial Officer. Since 2017, he has been its Director of International Relations and Networks. And as Vice President, he is a member of the Management Board. Alongside these roles, Arnouts is also a member of the board of directors of Port of Antwerp International (a subsidiary of Port of Antwerp focussed on international consultancy, port management and participations in overseas port projects), a member of the board of directors of APEC (the Port of Antwerp’s training subsidiary), and president of the board of directors of RTC, an inland rail terminal.

Presentation

North-CCU-Hub: carbon capture and utilisation as part of the strategy for achieving climate neutrality in the North Sea Port

The North-Sea-Port is characterised as a transnational port area with high industrial activity. It annually emits over 20 million tonnes of CO2. Carbon capture and utilisation (CCU) is an important tool for reducing these emissions, while simultaneously creating sustainable economic activities. The North-C-Methanol project is the first flagship project to come out of the North-CCU-Hub public-private consortium, which is also exploring other, even more innovative CCU pathways. This fits in well within a bigger strategy for attaining climate neutrality that involves other tools such as electrification, hydrogen, heat nets, CCS and others, currently being mapped by the Smart Delta Resource initiative.

Simon De Corte

Simon De Corte

Ghent University

Kickstart manager for materials valorisation

Simon De Corte has a PhD in environmental engineering from Ghent University, where he is currently its technology transfer advisor. He has been involved in the organisation of several regional, national and European innovation initiatives and communities related to circular economy. Bringing together research, industry and policy has always been at the core of his activities.

Alongside his job at Ghent University, Simon is currently a programme manager at North-CCU-Hub, a joint initiative of industry, governmental actors and knowledge institutes in the North Sea Port area (ranging from Ghent in Belgium to Terneuzen and Vlissingen in The Netherlands) that’s developing a roadmap for carbon capture & utilisation (CCU) in the region. Both commercial and innovative technologies are being deployed in project initiatives.

North-C-Methanol is a first demonstration project that aims to produce 45,000 tonnes of green methanol per year, based on green hydrogen. Production of fuels, proteins and construction materials based on CCU are also currently being investigated. Simon is involved at both strategic and operational level.

Presentation

Carbon capture and storage: the role of the port in development of a CO2 storage hub

Carbon capture and storage is a business that needs to operate at scale in order to be commercially attractive as a means of decarbonisation. The volume of CO2 emissions that can be made available at and around ports serves to create the scale needed for the development of large scale CO2 transportation and storage.

TotalEnergies is a major investor in the development of CO2 transportation and storage in Europe including the Aramis project in the Dutch sector of the North Sea. This project proposes a CO2 transport system for anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 captured from various sources located in multiple industrial clusters to be delivered via dedicated offshore pipelines to permanent geological storage in depleted gas reservoirs in the North Sea in line with Directive 2009/31/EC. Several of the stakeholders (emitters) will benefit from the shipping service provided by Aramis to transport captured CO2 to the main onshore hub at Rotterdam.

The Member States supporting the Aramis Project are the Netherlands, Belgium, France and Germany. The Aramis Project has the ambition to enable a pan-European, robust, competitive, modular and integrated CO2 permanent and safe storage project with multiple transport options (shipping, inland barge, onshore pipeline) to reach the depleted gas reservoirs. The project offers a pathway to decarbonisation of the hard-to-abate industry located at North Sea Port and the Port of Antwerp among other EU industrial Ports.

Mark Tandy

Mark Tandy

TOTALEnergies

Senior Business Developer

Mark Tandy is a business development manager in the Carbon Capture and Storage team at TotalEnergies. Having worked in the energy sector since obtaining his MBA from the Saïd Business School at Oxford University, he has held a number of senior commercial management and director level positions, and worked on projects all over the world. This experience has given him a deep understanding of the practical application of business models and joint venture management.

In addition to applying his transactional expertise, Mark has worked closely with regulators, policy makers and government, most recently as an active participant in the UK government’s consultation on CCS and low-carbon hydrogen business models. In his current role at TotalEnergies, to which he applies over 15 years of experience in CCS, Mark is responsible for new business and partnerships in the Middle East and Asia Pacific regions.

TotalEnergies itself has been active since the late 1990s in the development of carbon capture, storage and utilisation (CCUS) to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Today, 10% of the company’s R&D budget is allocated to relevant technologies. It also supports the Oil & Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), which manages an investment fund of over $1 billion for clean technologies, including CCUS. Alongside its flagship project in Norway, Northern Lights, the company is maturing a number of other CCS projects in Europe and other parts of the world.

Presentation

Hydrogen in the power sector and its role in climate neutrality

Electrification and gasification go hand in hand and are crucial on our transition pathway to carbon-neutral energy. Hydrogen made from renewable electricity will be crucial on this path. However, challenges related to its transport and storage mean it cannot be the only solution. We’ll need to make molecules containing other elements part of the mix.

Carbon (C) will be an important and required element in many of these molecules. Alongside the “Hydrogen Economy”, we therefore need to work towards a “Synthetic Hydrocarbon Economy”. This will require a lot of carbon as a carrier for hydrogen, embedded in products as a form of sequestration. It is crucial that this carbon is taken from the biosphere or recycled from biomass/biogas, not taken from fossil resources. However, efficiency losses when capturing and converting atmospheric CO2 mean the production of renewable molecules will drastically increase the overall demand for renewable energy.

Jan  Mertens

Jan Mertens

ENGIE

Chief Science Officer

Jan Mertens is ENGIE’s Chief Scientific Officer (CSO), responsible for co-building ENGIE’s long-term vision on technologies, identifying key international research players in selected emerging technologies and initiating partnerships.

His research activities cover topics related to life cycle assessment, emissions monitoring, carbon capture, carbon use and water footprinting, and he is the author of over 50 international peer-reviewed publications.

Since 2019, Jan has also been Visiting Professor at the University of Ghent, working in the domain of sustainable electricity generation.

Presentation

Kathy Van Damme

Kathy Van Damme

Port of Ostend

Board member

Kathy Van Damme is a board member of the Port of Ostend. With a strong background in the energy sector’s environmental and regulatory aspects, she has worked in this field for more than 15 years. Her broad scope of experience, all focused on ports and industry, includes technological developments for energy storage, energy transition, macro-economic consequences of climate change and investments in energy. Kathy Van Damme has also been a policy advisor on energy and environment at Fedustria and the European Panel Federation, and a manager at several energy companies in Flanders.

Panel discussion

Debate

Luc  Arnouts

Luc Arnouts

Port of Antwerp

Director International Relations & Networks

Since obtaining his master’s degrees in law from the University of Antwerp and in general management from the University of Ghent, Luc Arnouts has continually been active in the port and logistics sector. His career and gaining of operational experience in stevedoring, warehousing and ocean freight forwarding began at the logistics company Group Katoennatie. From there, he moved to SGS-Group Belgium, where he was General Manager of SGS-Van Bree, a member of the Central Management Committee and the Strategic Committee, and in charge of SGS’s logistics and port handling business in Belgium. In 2000, Arnouts joined the leading European airport handling company Aviapartner as VP of Cargo Handling Europe and a member of its Central Board.

In 2007, Luc Arnouts moved to the Antwerp Port Authority as its Chief Commercial Officer. Since 2017, he has been its Director of International Relations and Networks. And as Vice President, he is a member of the Management Board. Alongside these roles, Arnouts is also a member of the board of directors of Port of Antwerp International (a subsidiary of Port of Antwerp focussed on international consultancy, port management and participations in overseas port projects), a member of the board of directors of APEC (the Port of Antwerp’s training subsidiary), and president of the board of directors of RTC, an inland rail terminal.

Simon De Corte

Simon De Corte

Ghent University

Kickstart manager for materials valorisation

Simon De Corte has a PhD in environmental engineering from Ghent University, where he is currently its technology transfer advisor. He has been involved in the organisation of several regional, national and European innovation initiatives and communities related to circular economy. Bringing together research, industry and policy has always been at the core of his activities.

Alongside his job at Ghent University, Simon is currently a programme manager at North-CCU-Hub, a joint initiative of industry, governmental actors and knowledge institutes in the North Sea Port area (ranging from Ghent in Belgium to Terneuzen and Vlissingen in The Netherlands) that’s developing a roadmap for carbon capture & utilisation (CCU) in the region. Both commercial and innovative technologies are being deployed in project initiatives.

North-C-Methanol is a first demonstration project that aims to produce 45,000 tonnes of green methanol per year, based on green hydrogen. Production of fuels, proteins and construction materials based on CCU are also currently being investigated. Simon is involved at both strategic and operational level.

Mark Tandy

Mark Tandy

TOTALEnergies

Senior Business Developer

Mark Tandy is a business development manager in the Carbon Capture and Storage team at TotalEnergies. Having worked in the energy sector since obtaining his MBA from the Saïd Business School at Oxford University, he has held a number of senior commercial management and director level positions, and worked on projects all over the world. This experience has given him a deep understanding of the practical application of business models and joint venture management.

In addition to applying his transactional expertise, Mark has worked closely with regulators, policy makers and government, most recently as an active participant in the UK government’s consultation on CCS and low-carbon hydrogen business models. In his current role at TotalEnergies, to which he applies over 15 years of experience in CCS, Mark is responsible for new business and partnerships in the Middle East and Asia Pacific regions.

TotalEnergies itself has been active since the late 1990s in the development of carbon capture, storage and utilisation (CCUS) to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Today, 10% of the company’s R&D budget is allocated to relevant technologies. It also supports the Oil & Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), which manages an investment fund of over $1 billion for clean technologies, including CCUS. Alongside its flagship project in Norway, Northern Lights, the company is maturing a number of other CCS projects in Europe and other parts of the world.

Jan  Mertens

Jan Mertens

ENGIE

Chief Science Officer

Jan Mertens is ENGIE’s Chief Scientific Officer (CSO), responsible for co-building ENGIE’s long-term vision on technologies, identifying key international research players in selected emerging technologies and initiating partnerships.

His research activities cover topics related to life cycle assessment, emissions monitoring, carbon capture, carbon use and water footprinting, and he is the author of over 50 international peer-reviewed publications.

Since 2019, Jan has also been Visiting Professor at the University of Ghent, working in the domain of sustainable electricity generation.

Kathy Van Damme

Kathy Van Damme

Port of Ostend

Board member

Kathy Van Damme is a board member of the Port of Ostend. With a strong background in the energy sector’s environmental and regulatory aspects, she has worked in this field for more than 15 years. Her broad scope of experience, all focused on ports and industry, includes technological developments for energy storage, energy transition, macro-economic consequences of climate change and investments in energy. Kathy Van Damme has also been a policy advisor on energy and environment at Fedustria and the European Panel Federation, and a manager at several energy companies in Flanders.

Walter Eevers

Walter Eevers

VITO

Director of Research & Development

Walter Eevers is Director of Research & Development at VITO, Belgium. After obtaining his PhD in electrically conductive polymers from Antwerp University, he joined Nitto Europe where he was responsible for R&D and business development until becoming General Manager of Techno-Marketing. Walter became involved in global technology sourcing and marketing by setting up multiple collaborations with universities and research institutes.

In 2012, Eevers helped found Nitto Denko Europe Technical Centre in Lausanne as a company dedicated to research activities for medical devices. Eevers is also an external Expert and Vice Chair for the EU Commission, Conacyt (Mexico) and the Qatar Foundation for innovation programmes and projects. He is Vice-President of CO2 Value Europe, an industry association promoting and stimulating CCU.

Eevers is also Chairman of the Board of EnergyVille, the collaboration between KU Leuven, University of Hasselt, IMEC and VITO for sustainable energy research. In his current position, he has stimulated several spinoffs from VITO and held board positions in them. As a visiting professor at University of Antwerp for polymer chemistry, he is guiding research activities in the field of biobased polymer developments.

 

Deep dive session
Research and policy perspectives on CO2 as a resource
16:00 - 17:30
Belgian Pavilion

Climate, Energy

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Climate Energy

Deep dive session

Research and policy perspectives on CO2 as a resource

26/10/2021, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

14:00 - 15:30 CEST/SAST (Brussels, Cape Town)

13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

08:00 - 09:30 EDT (New York)

21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Belgian Pavilion & online

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Stabilising the climate will require strong, rapid and sustained reductions in greenhouse gasses and achieving net zero CO2 emissions. CCU needs to be a key pillar in the transition. This session examines what it will take to create an action plan for developing CCU into a new industrial sector, including the enablers and hurdles to accelerating CCU adoption, and what policy, institutional and regulatory changes are required.

Chaired by

Deepak Pant

Deepak Pant

VITO

Senior Scientist

Deepak is a senior scientist at the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO). He is currently working on electrosynthesis and resource recovery, specifically the design and optimisation of (bio)electrochemical cells for CO2 conversion and microbial electrosynthesis.

Pant has a PhD in environmental biotechnology and has 150 peer-reviewed publications (h-Index 61; >11300 citations), 6 books (edited), 6 patents and 35 book chapters to his credit.

He is also a member of various scientific communities such as ISMET (elected board member), ISE, BES, BRSI (Fellow), RSC, IFIBiop and AMI.

Deepak is the editor of “Bioresource Technology Reports” and serves as an Editorial board member for the journals Bioresource Technology, ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering iScience, Scientific Reports, Molecules, World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Electronic Journal of Biotechnology, Biofuel Research Journal, and Heliyon and Frontiers in Environmental Science.

 

Presentation

Getting to carbon-neutral: electrifying nature’s carbon cycle

The accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere is generally a kinetic issue, catalysed by the increasing presence of mankind and its industrial activity. The term “decarbonisation” is often used as a reference to mitigating further climate change by avoiding carbon emissions. However, given that life itself is carbon-based, we cannot exclude carbon from our lives. We therefore propose replacing it with the term “defossilisation”, as a reference to mitigating further climate change by minimising the release of CO2 from fossil origin.

We can capture the CO2 we release. But when we do so, we shouldn’t just tuck it back away in the earth’s crust. Instead, we should embrace it as a valuable feedstock, using renewable power to recycle its carbon atoms, refunctioning them with hydrogen to fuel our daily lives with already existing assets. In doing this, we can accelerate the carbon cycle with green electricity.

Jan  Vaes

Jan Vaes

VITO

Program Manager Sustainable Chemistry

Jan Vaes holds a master’s degree in materials science and engineering from KU Leuven (Belgium), where he also completed his PhD in electrochemistry. After four years as a corrosion consultant, providing advisory materials to the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, he joined imec as an R&D engineer. In this role, he developed process steps for semiconductor and solar cell manufacturing.

Jan spent 2012 to 2018 as Technology Director at Hydrogenics, where his work on energy storage solutions led to the development of alkaline and PEM water electrolysis systems, from basic component research to full system integration. Since 2018, Jan has been a programme manager in Vito’s Sustainable Chemistry business unit, focussed on electrosynthesis of chemicals and e-fuels for energy storage.

Presentation

The new role of CO2: from harmful fossil emissions to raw material for sustainable products

CO2 emissions are around the highest level ever with disastrous consequences due to an even accelerated climate change. The anthropogenic CO2 emissions have to be stopped as soon as possible to avoid major risks for civilisation. The ambitious target of the Paris Agreement practically leads to net-zero CO2 emissions around 2050. Almost all fossil CO2 emissions can be replaced by sustainable solutions. However, hydrocarbon-based solutions are still required, in particular for chemicals and long-distance aviation and marine transportation. CO2 is required as a raw material for carbon utilisation (CCU), and can be sourced from sustainable point sources (e.g. pulp and paper mills), not avoidable point sources (e.g. waste incinerators, limestone part from cement mills), or directly captured from the atmosphere. The presentation will provide an overview on the options, quantities, but also some economic considerations. CO2 as a raw material for CCU applications will emerge to a major growth market in the ongoing transition to achieve a sustainable energy system.

Christian  Breyer

Christian Breyer

Lappeenranta University of Technology

Professor

Christian Breyer is Professor for Solar Economy at LUT University, Finland. His main expertise is the integrated research of technological and economic characteristics of renewable energy systems, specialising in energy system modelling for 100% renewable energy on both local and global scale. Breyer’s team has published more studies on 100% renewable energy systems for countries or major regions than any other in the world. These cover integrated sector analyses with power, heat, transport, desalination, industry and negative CO2 emission options. Power-to-X investigations is one of his team’s core research fields. Christian has had more than 300 scientific papers published, of which more than 100 have been in scientific journals.

Loving the Alien: CO2 deserves our affection but save a seat for some other surprising climate change allies

Electrification and gasification go hand in hand and are crucial on our transition pathway to carbon-neutral energy. Hydrogen made from renewable electricity will be crucial on this path. However, challenges related to its transport and storage mean it cannot be the only solution. We’ll need to make other molecules part of the mix.

Carbon (C) will be an important and required chemical element in many of these molecules. Alongside the “Hydrogen Economy” we therefore need to work towards a “Synthetic Hydrocarbon Economy”. This will require a lot of carbon as a carrier for hydrogen, embedded in products as a form of sequestration. It is crucial that this carbon is taken from the biosphere or recycled from biomass/biogas, not taken from fossil resources. However, efficiency losses when capturing and converting atmospheric CO2 mean the production of renewable molecules will drastically increase the overall demand for renewable energy.

Jan  Mertens

Jan Mertens

ENGIE

Chief Science Officer

Jan Mertens is ENGIE’s Chief Scientific Officer (CSO), responsible for co-building ENGIE’s long-term vision on technologies, identifying key international research players in selected emerging technologies and initiating partnerships.

His research activities cover topics related to life cycle assessment, emissions monitoring, carbon capture, carbon use and water footprinting, and he is the author of over 50 international peer-reviewed publications.

Since 2019, Jan has also been Visiting Professor at the University of Ghent, working in the domain of sustainable electricity generation.

Using CO2 as a resource: barriers and accelerators

The increasing investment being made in CDU, together with political action in various countries and number of related publications, indicates it is rapidly gaining traction as a mainstream climate-relevant solution. The presentation will provide a framework for laying out the need for CDU, together with the opportunities, boundary conditions, potential pitfalls and critical needs for advancing the required technologies within the necessary time.

Volker  Sick

Volker Sick

University of Michigan

Professor Mechanical Engineering

Volker Sick is the DTE Energy Professor of Advanced Energy Research and an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He leads the Global CO2 Initiative at the University of Michigan that seeks to get CO2 capture and use recognised and implemented as a mainstream climate solution.

Cold plasma technology for CO2 conversion: a hot topic!

Plasma-based CO2 conversion is gaining increasing interest. Known as the fourth state of matter (alongside solid, liquid and gas), plasma is an ionized gas which consists of electrons, ions and neutral gas molecules.

Plasma is created by applying electricity to a gas. The electric field heats the light electrons, which in turn cause the gas molecules to be activated, resulting in the creation of reactive species which easily form new products. This reactive environment allows endothermic reactions, such as CO2 conversion, to occur under mild atmospheric pressure and room temperature conditions, in an energy-efficient way. Because plasma is created by electricity, and is easily switched on/off, it is very suitable for generation using electricity from (fluctuating) renewable sources.

This presentation will begin with a brief introduction to plasma, and its characteristics and advantages for CO2 conversion. There will then be an overview of the state of the art in plasma-based CO2 (and CH4) conversion via different types of plasma reactors, benchmarked against other emerging technologies. To conclude, recent experiment results and modelling will be presented to provide better understanding of the underlying mechanisms, with regard to improving plasma’s application in terms of conversion, energy efficiency and product formation.

Annemie  Bogaerts

Annemie Bogaerts

University of Anwerp

Professor Chemistry

Annemie Bogaerts is a full professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Antwerp and head of the research group PLASMANT (Plasma Lab for Applications in Sustainability and Medicine – ANTwerp).

Having obtained her master’s degree and PhD in chemistry from the University of Antwerp, in 1993 and 1996 respectively, her research focusses on the study of non-equilibrium plasmas by modelling and experimenting with plasma chemistry, plasma reactor design and plasma-surface interactions. Their eventual use is intended for sustainable chemistry and energy/environmental applications, such as CO2 conversion into value-added chemicals, N2 fixation and CH4 conversion, as well as plasma medicine (cancer treatment). Annemie Bogaerts has an ERC Synergy Grant for plasma catalysis for small molecule conversion (electrification of chemical reactions).

 

17 January 2022

Deep dive session
Climate
16:00 - 17:30

Climate

19 January 2022

Plenary session
The democratisation of technology: living the change in a post-pandemic world
10:00 - 11:00
Dubai Exhibition Centre

Circular Economy, Climate, ICT, Entrepreneurship

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Circular Economy Climate ICT Entrepreneurship

Plenary session

The democratisation of technology: living the change in a post-pandemic world

19/01/2022, 10:00 - 11:00 GST (Dubai)

07:00 - 08:00 CET/WAT (Brussels, Nigeria)

08:00 - 09:00 SAST (Cape Town)

01:00 - 02:00 EST (New York)

15:00 - 16:00 KST (Seoul)

14:00 - 15:00 CST (Beijing)

11:30 - 12:30 IST (New Delhi)

03:00 - 04:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

Dubai Exhibition Centre & online

Join us online >

Join us in Dubai >

The prospect of a green post-COVID recovery provides opportunities to shape our future more sustainably and equitably. Living this change will require a shift to holistic mindsets and re-evaluation of our relationships with nature and with each other. Frontier technologies will continue to play an important role, but it will be up to us to define and shape the technological realm’s ethical parameters.

This session will build upon the October 2021 Democratisation of Technology sessions in which indigenous values were introduced in the context of using digital technologies for social good. We will expand by looking at challenges associated with automation and job creation for people, creating new value through collaborative innovation, combating a digital divide and technology on the ethical edge.

This session is undertaken in collaboration with the Resilience Frontiers Initiative.

Chaired by

Musonda  Mumba

Musonda Mumba

UNDP, Rome Centre for Sustainable Development

Director

Musonda Mumba, a Zambian National, is the Director for The Rome Centre for Sustainable Development under United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in close collaboration with Italian Government (Ministry of Environment and Ecological Transition). The Centre focuses on three priority areas notably: Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Nature Protection. In her role, she provides strategic leadership on these matters through convening, collaboration, connecting and co-creation as the world navigates complexity and uncertainty, with the aim of achieving the SDGs collectively. Her ambition is that this work is done with a Systems Thinking lens and also Systems Leadership.

She has over 25 years’ experience in environmental and conservation issues globally. She is the Chair of the Global Partnership on Forest and Landscape Restoration (GPFLR) and Vice-Chair for the Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF). She is also the Founder of the Network of African Women Environmentalists (NAWE).

She has published widely in various journals, newspapers, articles and contributed to book chapters. Before joining UNDP, Musonda was the head of United Nations Environment Programme – UNEP’s Terrestrial Ecosystems Programme and served in various roles over a period of 12 years. Before working for UNEP, Musonda worked for the Zambian Government, Ramsar Convention on Wetlands (in Switzerland), WWF (at International, UK and East Africa Regional Offices) and as such working with governments on Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America.

She received her BSc. Ed degree at University of Zambia (UNZA) and has a PhD from University College London (UCL) in Wetland Conservation and Hydrology.

Introduction

Keynote speech

Digital technologies for social good

Youssef  Nassef

Youssef Nassef

UNFCCC

Director Adaptation

Youssef Nassef leads the work on adaptation to climate change under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. He has 30 years of experience in diplomacy and international environmental policy and is a seconded diplomat from the Egyptian Foreign Service.

While assuming progressively higher levels of leadership at the UNFCCC, he led UNFCCC support for a number of on-going initiatives on adaptation. These include the inception of National Adaptation Programme of Action, National Adaptation Plans, the Nairobi Work Programme (an international knowledge hub for impacts, vulnerability and adaptation) and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage.

Youssef holds a doctorate in international technology policy and management and a master’s degree in international environmental policy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, as well as a master’s degree in Middle East studies and a bachelor’s degree in computer science and physics from the American University in Cairo.

Keynote speech

Harnessing the power of innovation for nature and people

Zitouni Ould-Dada

Zitouni Ould-Dada

FAO

Deputy Director Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment

Zitouni Ould-Dada is Deputy Director of the Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Before joining FAO, he spent five years as Head of the Technology Unit at UNEP, where he lead work on technology, climate change, renewable energy and energy efficiency. He was a member of the UN Inter-Agency Task Team developing the Technology Facilitation Mechanism and its Annual Science Technology and Innovation Forum to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

Ould-Dada worked for the British Government for 15 years providing policy and technical advice in many areas, including food safety, environmental policy, climate change, energy policy, science and technology. He was the Lead Negotiator on International Climate Change and Technology for the UK (2008-2012) and France (2008), chairing negotiations on technology transfer, agriculture, blue carbon and nature and ecosystems, which contributed to reaching the landmark Paris Climate Agreement in 2015. His international responsibilities have also included Chair of EU Expert Group on Technology, Chair of IRENA’s Policy and Strategy Committee and Member of UN Task Team for producing a UN System-wide Approach to Climate Action for the UN Climate Action Summit 2019.

A national of both Morocco and the UK, Ould-Dada holds a PhD in environmental/radiation protection from Imperial College, London, a master’s degree in environmental management and planning from Université de Rennes, France, and a bachelor’s degree in environmental engineering from Institut Universitaire de Technologie, Perpignan, France.

Presentation

Creating new value through collaborative innovation

Sandra Piesik

Sandra Piesik

3 Ideas B.V.

Director

Sandra Piesik is an award-winning architect, author and researcher specialising in the implementation of global sustainable legislation, nature-based solutions and traditional knowledge adaptation. She is the founder of 3 ideas B.V. Amsterdam based consultancy, a senior consultant to UN-HABITAT on Urban and Rural Linkages at the Urban Practices Branch, and a former Policy Support Consultant on Rural – Urban Dynamics to UNCCD. Her diverse global engagements range from international lectures, judging of the competitions, nominator of awards, and evaluation of R&D projects for the European Union.

She is a stakeholder and network member of several UN organisations including UNFCCC: The Resilience Frontiers, the Nairobi Work Programme (NWP), the Paris Committee on Capacity Building (PCCB) and Climate and Technology Centre & Network (CTCN).

Her published work includes Arish: Palm-Leaf Architecture (published by: Thames & Hudson in 2012), she is also the general editor of the encyclopaedia, HABITAT: Vernacular Architecture for a Changing Planet (published by: Thames & Hudson, Abrams Books, Flammarion, Editions Detail and Blume in 2017).

Presentation

Combatting the digital divide to build inclusivity

Nibal  Idlebi

Nibal Idlebi

UN-ESCWA

Chief of Innovation

Nibal Idlebi is the chief of Innovation Section at UN-ESCWA. She is a senior policy expert in innovation and technology for sustainable development, knowledge society and digital and open government. She has extensive experience in policies and strategies for advancing the knowledge society, digital government transformation and innovation and entrepreneurship in the Arab nations. She has also supervised several regional initiatives on Digital Arabic Content, building trust in cyber space through cyber legislation, regional profile of information society and she is currently leading the ESCWA initiative on fostering open government in the Arab region.

Idlebi is an active member of several international and regional working groups and a jury member for regional and international awards on innovation, entrepreneurship and digital content. She has also been a jury member for many e-Government Awards in the Arab Region. Idlebi has a computer engineering degree and a PhD in computer science from France.

Q&A and discussion

Closing

Musonda  Mumba

Musonda Mumba

UNDP, Rome Centre for Sustainable Development

Director

Musonda Mumba, a Zambian National, is the Director for The Rome Centre for Sustainable Development under United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in close collaboration with Italian Government (Ministry of Environment and Ecological Transition). The Centre focuses on three priority areas notably: Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Nature Protection. In her role, she provides strategic leadership on these matters through convening, collaboration, connecting and co-creation as the world navigates complexity and uncertainty, with the aim of achieving the SDGs collectively. Her ambition is that this work is done with a Systems Thinking lens and also Systems Leadership.

She has over 25 years’ experience in environmental and conservation issues globally. She is the Chair of the Global Partnership on Forest and Landscape Restoration (GPFLR) and Vice-Chair for the Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF). She is also the Founder of the Network of African Women Environmentalists (NAWE).

She has published widely in various journals, newspapers, articles and contributed to book chapters. Before joining UNDP, Musonda was the head of United Nations Environment Programme – UNEP’s Terrestrial Ecosystems Programme and served in various roles over a period of 12 years. Before working for UNEP, Musonda worked for the Zambian Government, Ramsar Convention on Wetlands (in Switzerland), WWF (at International, UK and East Africa Regional Offices) and as such working with governments on Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America.

She received her BSc. Ed degree at University of Zambia (UNZA) and has a PhD from University College London (UCL) in Wetland Conservation and Hydrology.

Keynote speakers

Climate

Deep dive sessions

Nationally determined contributions and CO2 capture

Thematic coordinators

Climate

Thematic partners