Programme overview

G-STIC Conference February 2023

Sessions labeled will take place in EXPO MAG, the Convention Center in Rio de Janeiro. Sessions labeled will be live-streamed from Rio de Janeiro and can be followed online.

Show session times in local time zone

Main auditorium

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Education

×

Education

Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

This session will focus on the educational challenges that arose from the worldwide closure of schools during the pandemic.

The speakers will look at these challenges from a variety of perspectives. They will share their ideas about how to mitigate the loss of learning, emphasizing issues such as school dropouts, developing a new way of learning through curricular reorganization, teachers’ appreciation, and digital inclusion.

The panel will propose ways to improve education programs, especially those for vulnerable, marginalized, and disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples, girls and women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and people living in poverty.

Keynote speech

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai (TBC)

Advancing girl’s rights in education after Covid-19

Nobel Prize Winner 2014

Panel discussion

Stefania Giannini

Stefania Giannini (TBC)

UNESCO

Assistant Director-General for Education

Andressa Pellanda

Andressa Pellanda (TBC)

National Campaign for the Right to Education

General Coordinator

Chaired by

Jan De Groof

Jan De Groof

European Association for Educational Law and Policy

President

Education

Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

This session will focus on the educational challenges that arose from the worldwide closure of schools during the pandemic.

The speakers will look at these challenges from a variety of perspectives. They will share their ideas about how to mitigate the loss of learning, emphasizing issues such as school dropouts, developing a new way of learning through curricular reorganization, teachers’ appreciation, and digital inclusion.

The panel will propose ways to improve education programs, especially those for vulnerable, marginalized, and disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples, girls and women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and people living in poverty.

Keynote speech

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai (TBC)

Advancing girl’s rights in education after Covid-19

Nobel Prize Winner 2014

Panel discussion

Stefania Giannini

Stefania Giannini (TBC)

UNESCO

Assistant Director-General for Education

Andressa Pellanda

Andressa Pellanda (TBC)

National Campaign for the Right to Education

General Coordinator

Chaired by

Jan De Groof

Jan De Groof

European Association for Educational Law and Policy

President

Education

Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

This session will focus on the educational challenges that arose from the worldwide closure of schools during the pandemic.

The speakers will look at these challenges from a variety of perspectives. They will share their ideas about how to mitigate the loss of learning, emphasizing issues such as school dropouts, developing a new way of learning through curricular reorganization, teachers’ appreciation, and digital inclusion.

The panel will propose ways to improve education programs, especially those for vulnerable, marginalized, and disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples, girls and women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and people living in poverty.

Keynote speech

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai (TBC)

Advancing girl’s rights in education after Covid-19

Nobel Prize Winner 2014

Panel discussion

Stefania Giannini

Stefania Giannini (TBC)

UNESCO

Assistant Director-General for Education

Andressa Pellanda

Andressa Pellanda (TBC)

National Campaign for the Right to Education

General Coordinator

Chaired by

Jan De Groof

Jan De Groof

European Association for Educational Law and Policy

President

Education

Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

This session will focus on the educational challenges that arose from the worldwide closure of schools during the pandemic.

The speakers will look at these challenges from a variety of perspectives. They will share their ideas about how to mitigate the loss of learning, emphasizing issues such as school dropouts, developing a new way of learning through curricular reorganization, teachers’ appreciation, and digital inclusion.

The panel will propose ways to improve education programs, especially those for vulnerable, marginalized, and disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples, girls and women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and people living in poverty.

Keynote speech

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai (TBC)

Advancing girl’s rights in education after Covid-19

Nobel Prize Winner 2014

Panel discussion

Stefania Giannini

Stefania Giannini (TBC)

UNESCO

Assistant Director-General for Education

Andressa Pellanda

Andressa Pellanda (TBC)

National Campaign for the Right to Education

General Coordinator

Chaired by

Jan De Groof

Jan De Groof

European Association for Educational Law and Policy

President

Education

Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

This session will focus on the educational challenges that arose from the worldwide closure of schools during the pandemic.

The speakers will look at these challenges from a variety of perspectives. They will share their ideas about how to mitigate the loss of learning, emphasizing issues such as school dropouts, developing a new way of learning through curricular reorganization, teachers’ appreciation, and digital inclusion.

The panel will propose ways to improve education programs, especially those for vulnerable, marginalized, and disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples, girls and women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and people living in poverty.

Keynote speech

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai (TBC)

Advancing girl’s rights in education after Covid-19

Nobel Prize Winner 2014

Panel discussion

Stefania Giannini

Stefania Giannini (TBC)

UNESCO

Assistant Director-General for Education

Andressa Pellanda

Andressa Pellanda (TBC)

National Campaign for the Right to Education

General Coordinator

Chaired by

Jan De Groof

Jan De Groof

European Association for Educational Law and Policy

President

Education

Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

This session will focus on the educational challenges that arose from the worldwide closure of schools during the pandemic.

The speakers will look at these challenges from a variety of perspectives. They will share their ideas about how to mitigate the loss of learning, emphasizing issues such as school dropouts, developing a new way of learning through curricular reorganization, teachers’ appreciation, and digital inclusion.

The panel will propose ways to improve education programs, especially those for vulnerable, marginalized, and disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples, girls and women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and people living in poverty.

Keynote speech

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai (TBC)

Advancing girl’s rights in education after Covid-19

Nobel Prize Winner 2014

Panel discussion

Stefania Giannini

Stefania Giannini (TBC)

UNESCO

Assistant Director-General for Education

Andressa Pellanda

Andressa Pellanda (TBC)

National Campaign for the Right to Education

General Coordinator

Chaired by

Jan De Groof

Jan De Groof

European Association for Educational Law and Policy

President

Education

Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

This session will focus on the educational challenges that arose from the worldwide closure of schools during the pandemic.

The speakers will look at these challenges from a variety of perspectives. They will share their ideas about how to mitigate the loss of learning, emphasizing issues such as school dropouts, developing a new way of learning through curricular reorganization, teachers’ appreciation, and digital inclusion.

The panel will propose ways to improve education programs, especially those for vulnerable, marginalized, and disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples, girls and women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and people living in poverty.

Keynote speech

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai (TBC)

Advancing girl’s rights in education after Covid-19

Nobel Prize Winner 2014

Panel discussion

Stefania Giannini

Stefania Giannini (TBC)

UNESCO

Assistant Director-General for Education

Andressa Pellanda

Andressa Pellanda (TBC)

National Campaign for the Right to Education

General Coordinator

Chaired by

Jan De Groof

Jan De Groof

European Association for Educational Law and Policy

President

Education

Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

This session will focus on the educational challenges that arose from the worldwide closure of schools during the pandemic.

The speakers will look at these challenges from a variety of perspectives. They will share their ideas about how to mitigate the loss of learning, emphasizing issues such as school dropouts, developing a new way of learning through curricular reorganization, teachers’ appreciation, and digital inclusion.

The panel will propose ways to improve education programs, especially those for vulnerable, marginalized, and disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples, girls and women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and people living in poverty.

Keynote speech

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai (TBC)

Advancing girl’s rights in education after Covid-19

Nobel Prize Winner 2014

Panel discussion

Stefania Giannini

Stefania Giannini (TBC)

UNESCO

Assistant Director-General for Education

Andressa Pellanda

Andressa Pellanda (TBC)

National Campaign for the Right to Education

General Coordinator

Chaired by

Jan De Groof

Jan De Groof

European Association for Educational Law and Policy

President

Education

Plenary session: Dealing with school dropouts, curriculum realignment and digital inclusion

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

This session will focus on the educational challenges that arose from the worldwide closure of schools during the pandemic.

The speakers will look at these challenges from a variety of perspectives. They will share their ideas about how to mitigate the loss of learning, emphasizing issues such as school dropouts, developing a new way of learning through curricular reorganization, teachers’ appreciation, and digital inclusion.

The panel will propose ways to improve education programs, especially those for vulnerable, marginalized, and disadvantaged groups, including indigenous peoples, girls and women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, and people living in poverty.

Keynote speech

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai (TBC)

Advancing girl’s rights in education after Covid-19

Nobel Prize Winner 2014

Panel discussion

Stefania Giannini

Stefania Giannini (TBC)

UNESCO

Assistant Director-General for Education

Andressa Pellanda

Andressa Pellanda (TBC)

National Campaign for the Right to Education

General Coordinator

Chaired by

Jan De Groof

Jan De Groof

European Association for Educational Law and Policy

President

10:15
14:15
14:15
15:15
08:15
22:15
21:15
18:45
17:15
Coffee break & networking
10:30
14:30
14:30
15:30
08:30
22:30
21:30
19:00
17:30
Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Climate

×

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

12:00
16:00
16:00
17:00
10:00
00:00
23:00
20:30
19:00
Brunch & networking
13:30
17:30
17:30
18:30
11:30
01:30
00:30
22:00
20:30
Thematic plenary session

Oceans

14:45
18:45
18:45
19:45
12:45
02:45
01:45
23:15
21:45
Coffee break & networking
15:00
19:00
19:00
20:00
13:00
03:00
02:00
23:30
22:00
Deep dive session

Oceans

16:15
20:15
20:15
21:15
14:15
04:15
03:15
00:45
23:15
Coffee break & networking
16:30
20:30
20:30
21:30
14:30
04:30
03:30
01:00
23:30
Special session: Bioeconomy

Cross-thematic

17:45
21:45
21:45
22:45
15:45
05:45
04:45
02:15
00:45
Reception & artistic performance

Auditorium 3

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Side event: Vaccines

Auditorium 1

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Water

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Water

Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is a basic human right that is still lacking in many parts of the world. Peri-urban and rural areas in developing countries are particularly affected as these areas do not normally have a proper water infrastructure. When there is an infrastructure, it is often prone to failure due to limited capacity, resources and/or the political will to maintain a widely dispersed system. There are also problems with repair and maintenance, and when a system fails, it is often not repaired quickly, if repaired at all. Under these circumstances, people are forced to get water from alternative sources which can be some distance away, or even pay for it to be transported, making it unreliable and unaffordable to meet basic WASH needs.

The UN World Water Development Report 2021 highlights the fact that an integrated approach to WASH can lead to improved health, increased school attendance, greater privacy and safety especially for women, children and the most-vulnerable individuals, and provide a greater sense of dignity for all. The current frameworks to establish sustainable long-term WASH in peri-urban and rural areas revolve around the combination of technological innovations and social interventions. Quite often, the technology will be working as it should but more needs to be done to get people to use it, especially in deeply rural or marginalized areas.

This session will share the lessons learnt from successful WASH projects in peri-urban and rural areas and will highlight breakthroughs to sustainable WASH in marginalized areas. The panelists will present successful cases of sustainable WASH in South America, India and Africa.

Naidson Baptista

Naidson Baptista

Brazilian Semi-Arid Articulation

National Coordinator

Luís Velasco

Luís Velasco

Latin American Confederation of Community Organizations for Water Services and Sanitation (CLOCSAS)

President

Sara López

Sara López

National Service for Environmental Sanitaion of Paraguay (SENASA)

General Director

Mr.  Anshuman

Mr. Anshuman

The Energy Resource Institute (TERI)

Associate Director Water Resources

Akila Munir

Akila Munir

Enabel Mozambique

National Strategy Advisor

Joyce Najm Mendez

Joyce Najm Mendez (TBC)

Latin American and Caribbean Regional Focal Point of the SDG7 Youth Constituency

Moderated by

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Water

Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is a basic human right that is still lacking in many parts of the world. Peri-urban and rural areas in developing countries are particularly affected as these areas do not normally have a proper water infrastructure. When there is an infrastructure, it is often prone to failure due to limited capacity, resources and/or the political will to maintain a widely dispersed system. There are also problems with repair and maintenance, and when a system fails, it is often not repaired quickly, if repaired at all. Under these circumstances, people are forced to get water from alternative sources which can be some distance away, or even pay for it to be transported, making it unreliable and unaffordable to meet basic WASH needs.

The UN World Water Development Report 2021 highlights the fact that an integrated approach to WASH can lead to improved health, increased school attendance, greater privacy and safety especially for women, children and the most-vulnerable individuals, and provide a greater sense of dignity for all. The current frameworks to establish sustainable long-term WASH in peri-urban and rural areas revolve around the combination of technological innovations and social interventions. Quite often, the technology will be working as it should but more needs to be done to get people to use it, especially in deeply rural or marginalized areas.

This session will share the lessons learnt from successful WASH projects in peri-urban and rural areas and will highlight breakthroughs to sustainable WASH in marginalized areas. The panelists will present successful cases of sustainable WASH in South America, India and Africa.

Naidson Baptista

Naidson Baptista

Brazilian Semi-Arid Articulation

National Coordinator

Luís Velasco

Luís Velasco

Latin American Confederation of Community Organizations for Water Services and Sanitation (CLOCSAS)

President

Sara López

Sara López

National Service for Environmental Sanitaion of Paraguay (SENASA)

General Director

Mr.  Anshuman

Mr. Anshuman

The Energy Resource Institute (TERI)

Associate Director Water Resources

Akila Munir

Akila Munir

Enabel Mozambique

National Strategy Advisor

Joyce Najm Mendez

Joyce Najm Mendez (TBC)

Latin American and Caribbean Regional Focal Point of the SDG7 Youth Constituency

Moderated by

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Water

Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is a basic human right that is still lacking in many parts of the world. Peri-urban and rural areas in developing countries are particularly affected as these areas do not normally have a proper water infrastructure. When there is an infrastructure, it is often prone to failure due to limited capacity, resources and/or the political will to maintain a widely dispersed system. There are also problems with repair and maintenance, and when a system fails, it is often not repaired quickly, if repaired at all. Under these circumstances, people are forced to get water from alternative sources which can be some distance away, or even pay for it to be transported, making it unreliable and unaffordable to meet basic WASH needs.

The UN World Water Development Report 2021 highlights the fact that an integrated approach to WASH can lead to improved health, increased school attendance, greater privacy and safety especially for women, children and the most-vulnerable individuals, and provide a greater sense of dignity for all. The current frameworks to establish sustainable long-term WASH in peri-urban and rural areas revolve around the combination of technological innovations and social interventions. Quite often, the technology will be working as it should but more needs to be done to get people to use it, especially in deeply rural or marginalized areas.

This session will share the lessons learnt from successful WASH projects in peri-urban and rural areas and will highlight breakthroughs to sustainable WASH in marginalized areas. The panelists will present successful cases of sustainable WASH in South America, India and Africa.

Naidson Baptista

Naidson Baptista

Brazilian Semi-Arid Articulation

National Coordinator

Luís Velasco

Luís Velasco

Latin American Confederation of Community Organizations for Water Services and Sanitation (CLOCSAS)

President

Sara López

Sara López

National Service for Environmental Sanitaion of Paraguay (SENASA)

General Director

Mr.  Anshuman

Mr. Anshuman

The Energy Resource Institute (TERI)

Associate Director Water Resources

Akila Munir

Akila Munir

Enabel Mozambique

National Strategy Advisor

Joyce Najm Mendez

Joyce Najm Mendez (TBC)

Latin American and Caribbean Regional Focal Point of the SDG7 Youth Constituency

Moderated by

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Water

Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is a basic human right that is still lacking in many parts of the world. Peri-urban and rural areas in developing countries are particularly affected as these areas do not normally have a proper water infrastructure. When there is an infrastructure, it is often prone to failure due to limited capacity, resources and/or the political will to maintain a widely dispersed system. There are also problems with repair and maintenance, and when a system fails, it is often not repaired quickly, if repaired at all. Under these circumstances, people are forced to get water from alternative sources which can be some distance away, or even pay for it to be transported, making it unreliable and unaffordable to meet basic WASH needs.

The UN World Water Development Report 2021 highlights the fact that an integrated approach to WASH can lead to improved health, increased school attendance, greater privacy and safety especially for women, children and the most-vulnerable individuals, and provide a greater sense of dignity for all. The current frameworks to establish sustainable long-term WASH in peri-urban and rural areas revolve around the combination of technological innovations and social interventions. Quite often, the technology will be working as it should but more needs to be done to get people to use it, especially in deeply rural or marginalized areas.

This session will share the lessons learnt from successful WASH projects in peri-urban and rural areas and will highlight breakthroughs to sustainable WASH in marginalized areas. The panelists will present successful cases of sustainable WASH in South America, India and Africa.

Naidson Baptista

Naidson Baptista

Brazilian Semi-Arid Articulation

National Coordinator

Luís Velasco

Luís Velasco

Latin American Confederation of Community Organizations for Water Services and Sanitation (CLOCSAS)

President

Sara López

Sara López

National Service for Environmental Sanitaion of Paraguay (SENASA)

General Director

Mr.  Anshuman

Mr. Anshuman

The Energy Resource Institute (TERI)

Associate Director Water Resources

Akila Munir

Akila Munir

Enabel Mozambique

National Strategy Advisor

Joyce Najm Mendez

Joyce Najm Mendez (TBC)

Latin American and Caribbean Regional Focal Point of the SDG7 Youth Constituency

Moderated by

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Water

Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is a basic human right that is still lacking in many parts of the world. Peri-urban and rural areas in developing countries are particularly affected as these areas do not normally have a proper water infrastructure. When there is an infrastructure, it is often prone to failure due to limited capacity, resources and/or the political will to maintain a widely dispersed system. There are also problems with repair and maintenance, and when a system fails, it is often not repaired quickly, if repaired at all. Under these circumstances, people are forced to get water from alternative sources which can be some distance away, or even pay for it to be transported, making it unreliable and unaffordable to meet basic WASH needs.

The UN World Water Development Report 2021 highlights the fact that an integrated approach to WASH can lead to improved health, increased school attendance, greater privacy and safety especially for women, children and the most-vulnerable individuals, and provide a greater sense of dignity for all. The current frameworks to establish sustainable long-term WASH in peri-urban and rural areas revolve around the combination of technological innovations and social interventions. Quite often, the technology will be working as it should but more needs to be done to get people to use it, especially in deeply rural or marginalized areas.

This session will share the lessons learnt from successful WASH projects in peri-urban and rural areas and will highlight breakthroughs to sustainable WASH in marginalized areas. The panelists will present successful cases of sustainable WASH in South America, India and Africa.

Naidson Baptista

Naidson Baptista

Brazilian Semi-Arid Articulation

National Coordinator

Luís Velasco

Luís Velasco

Latin American Confederation of Community Organizations for Water Services and Sanitation (CLOCSAS)

President

Sara López

Sara López

National Service for Environmental Sanitaion of Paraguay (SENASA)

General Director

Mr.  Anshuman

Mr. Anshuman

The Energy Resource Institute (TERI)

Associate Director Water Resources

Akila Munir

Akila Munir

Enabel Mozambique

National Strategy Advisor

Joyce Najm Mendez

Joyce Najm Mendez (TBC)

Latin American and Caribbean Regional Focal Point of the SDG7 Youth Constituency

Moderated by

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Water

Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is a basic human right that is still lacking in many parts of the world. Peri-urban and rural areas in developing countries are particularly affected as these areas do not normally have a proper water infrastructure. When there is an infrastructure, it is often prone to failure due to limited capacity, resources and/or the political will to maintain a widely dispersed system. There are also problems with repair and maintenance, and when a system fails, it is often not repaired quickly, if repaired at all. Under these circumstances, people are forced to get water from alternative sources which can be some distance away, or even pay for it to be transported, making it unreliable and unaffordable to meet basic WASH needs.

The UN World Water Development Report 2021 highlights the fact that an integrated approach to WASH can lead to improved health, increased school attendance, greater privacy and safety especially for women, children and the most-vulnerable individuals, and provide a greater sense of dignity for all. The current frameworks to establish sustainable long-term WASH in peri-urban and rural areas revolve around the combination of technological innovations and social interventions. Quite often, the technology will be working as it should but more needs to be done to get people to use it, especially in deeply rural or marginalized areas.

This session will share the lessons learnt from successful WASH projects in peri-urban and rural areas and will highlight breakthroughs to sustainable WASH in marginalized areas. The panelists will present successful cases of sustainable WASH in South America, India and Africa.

Naidson Baptista

Naidson Baptista

Brazilian Semi-Arid Articulation

National Coordinator

Luís Velasco

Luís Velasco

Latin American Confederation of Community Organizations for Water Services and Sanitation (CLOCSAS)

President

Sara López

Sara López

National Service for Environmental Sanitaion of Paraguay (SENASA)

General Director

Mr.  Anshuman

Mr. Anshuman

The Energy Resource Institute (TERI)

Associate Director Water Resources

Akila Munir

Akila Munir

Enabel Mozambique

National Strategy Advisor

Joyce Najm Mendez

Joyce Najm Mendez (TBC)

Latin American and Caribbean Regional Focal Point of the SDG7 Youth Constituency

Moderated by

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Water

Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is a basic human right that is still lacking in many parts of the world. Peri-urban and rural areas in developing countries are particularly affected as these areas do not normally have a proper water infrastructure. When there is an infrastructure, it is often prone to failure due to limited capacity, resources and/or the political will to maintain a widely dispersed system. There are also problems with repair and maintenance, and when a system fails, it is often not repaired quickly, if repaired at all. Under these circumstances, people are forced to get water from alternative sources which can be some distance away, or even pay for it to be transported, making it unreliable and unaffordable to meet basic WASH needs.

The UN World Water Development Report 2021 highlights the fact that an integrated approach to WASH can lead to improved health, increased school attendance, greater privacy and safety especially for women, children and the most-vulnerable individuals, and provide a greater sense of dignity for all. The current frameworks to establish sustainable long-term WASH in peri-urban and rural areas revolve around the combination of technological innovations and social interventions. Quite often, the technology will be working as it should but more needs to be done to get people to use it, especially in deeply rural or marginalized areas.

This session will share the lessons learnt from successful WASH projects in peri-urban and rural areas and will highlight breakthroughs to sustainable WASH in marginalized areas. The panelists will present successful cases of sustainable WASH in South America, India and Africa.

Naidson Baptista

Naidson Baptista

Brazilian Semi-Arid Articulation

National Coordinator

Luís Velasco

Luís Velasco

Latin American Confederation of Community Organizations for Water Services and Sanitation (CLOCSAS)

President

Sara López

Sara López

National Service for Environmental Sanitaion of Paraguay (SENASA)

General Director

Mr.  Anshuman

Mr. Anshuman

The Energy Resource Institute (TERI)

Associate Director Water Resources

Akila Munir

Akila Munir

Enabel Mozambique

National Strategy Advisor

Joyce Najm Mendez

Joyce Najm Mendez (TBC)

Latin American and Caribbean Regional Focal Point of the SDG7 Youth Constituency

Moderated by

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Water

Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is a basic human right that is still lacking in many parts of the world. Peri-urban and rural areas in developing countries are particularly affected as these areas do not normally have a proper water infrastructure. When there is an infrastructure, it is often prone to failure due to limited capacity, resources and/or the political will to maintain a widely dispersed system. There are also problems with repair and maintenance, and when a system fails, it is often not repaired quickly, if repaired at all. Under these circumstances, people are forced to get water from alternative sources which can be some distance away, or even pay for it to be transported, making it unreliable and unaffordable to meet basic WASH needs.

The UN World Water Development Report 2021 highlights the fact that an integrated approach to WASH can lead to improved health, increased school attendance, greater privacy and safety especially for women, children and the most-vulnerable individuals, and provide a greater sense of dignity for all. The current frameworks to establish sustainable long-term WASH in peri-urban and rural areas revolve around the combination of technological innovations and social interventions. Quite often, the technology will be working as it should but more needs to be done to get people to use it, especially in deeply rural or marginalized areas.

This session will share the lessons learnt from successful WASH projects in peri-urban and rural areas and will highlight breakthroughs to sustainable WASH in marginalized areas. The panelists will present successful cases of sustainable WASH in South America, India and Africa.

Naidson Baptista

Naidson Baptista

Brazilian Semi-Arid Articulation

National Coordinator

Luís Velasco

Luís Velasco

Latin American Confederation of Community Organizations for Water Services and Sanitation (CLOCSAS)

President

Sara López

Sara López

National Service for Environmental Sanitaion of Paraguay (SENASA)

General Director

Mr.  Anshuman

Mr. Anshuman

The Energy Resource Institute (TERI)

Associate Director Water Resources

Akila Munir

Akila Munir

Enabel Mozambique

National Strategy Advisor

Joyce Najm Mendez

Joyce Najm Mendez (TBC)

Latin American and Caribbean Regional Focal Point of the SDG7 Youth Constituency

Moderated by

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Water

Deep dive session: Sustainable WASH in peri-urban and rural areas

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) is a basic human right that is still lacking in many parts of the world. Peri-urban and rural areas in developing countries are particularly affected as these areas do not normally have a proper water infrastructure. When there is an infrastructure, it is often prone to failure due to limited capacity, resources and/or the political will to maintain a widely dispersed system. There are also problems with repair and maintenance, and when a system fails, it is often not repaired quickly, if repaired at all. Under these circumstances, people are forced to get water from alternative sources which can be some distance away, or even pay for it to be transported, making it unreliable and unaffordable to meet basic WASH needs.

The UN World Water Development Report 2021 highlights the fact that an integrated approach to WASH can lead to improved health, increased school attendance, greater privacy and safety especially for women, children and the most-vulnerable individuals, and provide a greater sense of dignity for all. The current frameworks to establish sustainable long-term WASH in peri-urban and rural areas revolve around the combination of technological innovations and social interventions. Quite often, the technology will be working as it should but more needs to be done to get people to use it, especially in deeply rural or marginalized areas.

This session will share the lessons learnt from successful WASH projects in peri-urban and rural areas and will highlight breakthroughs to sustainable WASH in marginalized areas. The panelists will present successful cases of sustainable WASH in South America, India and Africa.

Naidson Baptista

Naidson Baptista

Brazilian Semi-Arid Articulation

National Coordinator

Luís Velasco

Luís Velasco

Latin American Confederation of Community Organizations for Water Services and Sanitation (CLOCSAS)

President

Sara López

Sara López

National Service for Environmental Sanitaion of Paraguay (SENASA)

General Director

Mr.  Anshuman

Mr. Anshuman

The Energy Resource Institute (TERI)

Associate Director Water Resources

Akila Munir

Akila Munir

Enabel Mozambique

National Strategy Advisor

Joyce Najm Mendez

Joyce Najm Mendez (TBC)

Latin American and Caribbean Regional Focal Point of the SDG7 Youth Constituency

Moderated by

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

10:15
14:15
14:15
15:15
08:15
22:15
21:15
18:45
17:15
Coffee break & networking
10:30
14:30
14:30
15:30
08:30
22:30
21:30
19:00
17:30
Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Water

×

Water

Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Large amounts of untreated wastewater worldwide are still released into streams and rivers, leading to contamination of these vital water supplies. According to the UN World Water Development Report 2021, only 8% of domestic and industrial wastewater is treated in low-income countries, compared with an average of 70% in high-income countries. This poses a serious threat to public health and the environment, especially in developing countries with rapidly growing populations, where the situation is likely to get worse.

Sustainable Development Goal 6.3 focusses precisely on improved water quality, wastewater treatment and safe reuse. Nonetheless, there is growing concern around emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFAS, and viruses. Although often present in low concentrations, the impact of these pollutants is yet unclear. Monitoring is key to assess the accumulation of pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water. Monitoring wastewater streams is vital as these can be an indicator of the general health of a population.

Assessing the health risks around wastewater reuse is also crucial. First, this must be looked at from a technology perspective: how is research and innovation being applied to reuse as a safe and sustainable measure for climate adaptation? Secondly, the societal aspect: how do people feel about wastewater reuse? During this session, the panelists will present ways to balance the real and perceived health risks from water reuse and how to change the way people think about this.

Catarina Baptista

Catarina Baptista

VITO WaterClimateHub

R&D Engineer Water

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Federal University of Viçosa

Academic researcher

Cesar Mota

Cesar Mota

Federal University of Minas Gerais

Associate Professor in the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

Inge Genné

Inge Genné (TBC)

VITO WaterClimateHub

Program Manager Water

Moderated by

Katrien  Van Hooydonk

Katrien Van Hooydonk

VITO WaterClimateHub

Project Lead Strategic Partnerships and Internationalisation

Water

Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Large amounts of untreated wastewater worldwide are still released into streams and rivers, leading to contamination of these vital water supplies. According to the UN World Water Development Report 2021, only 8% of domestic and industrial wastewater is treated in low-income countries, compared with an average of 70% in high-income countries. This poses a serious threat to public health and the environment, especially in developing countries with rapidly growing populations, where the situation is likely to get worse.

Sustainable Development Goal 6.3 focusses precisely on improved water quality, wastewater treatment and safe reuse. Nonetheless, there is growing concern around emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFAS, and viruses. Although often present in low concentrations, the impact of these pollutants is yet unclear. Monitoring is key to assess the accumulation of pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water. Monitoring wastewater streams is vital as these can be an indicator of the general health of a population.

Assessing the health risks around wastewater reuse is also crucial. First, this must be looked at from a technology perspective: how is research and innovation being applied to reuse as a safe and sustainable measure for climate adaptation? Secondly, the societal aspect: how do people feel about wastewater reuse? During this session, the panelists will present ways to balance the real and perceived health risks from water reuse and how to change the way people think about this.

Catarina Baptista

Catarina Baptista

VITO WaterClimateHub

R&D Engineer Water

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Federal University of Viçosa

Academic researcher

Cesar Mota

Cesar Mota

Federal University of Minas Gerais

Associate Professor in the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

Inge Genné

Inge Genné (TBC)

VITO WaterClimateHub

Program Manager Water

Moderated by

Katrien  Van Hooydonk

Katrien Van Hooydonk

VITO WaterClimateHub

Project Lead Strategic Partnerships and Internationalisation

Water

Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Large amounts of untreated wastewater worldwide are still released into streams and rivers, leading to contamination of these vital water supplies. According to the UN World Water Development Report 2021, only 8% of domestic and industrial wastewater is treated in low-income countries, compared with an average of 70% in high-income countries. This poses a serious threat to public health and the environment, especially in developing countries with rapidly growing populations, where the situation is likely to get worse.

Sustainable Development Goal 6.3 focusses precisely on improved water quality, wastewater treatment and safe reuse. Nonetheless, there is growing concern around emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFAS, and viruses. Although often present in low concentrations, the impact of these pollutants is yet unclear. Monitoring is key to assess the accumulation of pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water. Monitoring wastewater streams is vital as these can be an indicator of the general health of a population.

Assessing the health risks around wastewater reuse is also crucial. First, this must be looked at from a technology perspective: how is research and innovation being applied to reuse as a safe and sustainable measure for climate adaptation? Secondly, the societal aspect: how do people feel about wastewater reuse? During this session, the panelists will present ways to balance the real and perceived health risks from water reuse and how to change the way people think about this.

Catarina Baptista

Catarina Baptista

VITO WaterClimateHub

R&D Engineer Water

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Federal University of Viçosa

Academic researcher

Cesar Mota

Cesar Mota

Federal University of Minas Gerais

Associate Professor in the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

Inge Genné

Inge Genné (TBC)

VITO WaterClimateHub

Program Manager Water

Moderated by

Katrien  Van Hooydonk

Katrien Van Hooydonk

VITO WaterClimateHub

Project Lead Strategic Partnerships and Internationalisation

Water

Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Large amounts of untreated wastewater worldwide are still released into streams and rivers, leading to contamination of these vital water supplies. According to the UN World Water Development Report 2021, only 8% of domestic and industrial wastewater is treated in low-income countries, compared with an average of 70% in high-income countries. This poses a serious threat to public health and the environment, especially in developing countries with rapidly growing populations, where the situation is likely to get worse.

Sustainable Development Goal 6.3 focusses precisely on improved water quality, wastewater treatment and safe reuse. Nonetheless, there is growing concern around emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFAS, and viruses. Although often present in low concentrations, the impact of these pollutants is yet unclear. Monitoring is key to assess the accumulation of pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water. Monitoring wastewater streams is vital as these can be an indicator of the general health of a population.

Assessing the health risks around wastewater reuse is also crucial. First, this must be looked at from a technology perspective: how is research and innovation being applied to reuse as a safe and sustainable measure for climate adaptation? Secondly, the societal aspect: how do people feel about wastewater reuse? During this session, the panelists will present ways to balance the real and perceived health risks from water reuse and how to change the way people think about this.

Catarina Baptista

Catarina Baptista

VITO WaterClimateHub

R&D Engineer Water

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Federal University of Viçosa

Academic researcher

Cesar Mota

Cesar Mota

Federal University of Minas Gerais

Associate Professor in the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

Inge Genné

Inge Genné (TBC)

VITO WaterClimateHub

Program Manager Water

Moderated by

Katrien  Van Hooydonk

Katrien Van Hooydonk

VITO WaterClimateHub

Project Lead Strategic Partnerships and Internationalisation

Water

Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Large amounts of untreated wastewater worldwide are still released into streams and rivers, leading to contamination of these vital water supplies. According to the UN World Water Development Report 2021, only 8% of domestic and industrial wastewater is treated in low-income countries, compared with an average of 70% in high-income countries. This poses a serious threat to public health and the environment, especially in developing countries with rapidly growing populations, where the situation is likely to get worse.

Sustainable Development Goal 6.3 focusses precisely on improved water quality, wastewater treatment and safe reuse. Nonetheless, there is growing concern around emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFAS, and viruses. Although often present in low concentrations, the impact of these pollutants is yet unclear. Monitoring is key to assess the accumulation of pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water. Monitoring wastewater streams is vital as these can be an indicator of the general health of a population.

Assessing the health risks around wastewater reuse is also crucial. First, this must be looked at from a technology perspective: how is research and innovation being applied to reuse as a safe and sustainable measure for climate adaptation? Secondly, the societal aspect: how do people feel about wastewater reuse? During this session, the panelists will present ways to balance the real and perceived health risks from water reuse and how to change the way people think about this.

Catarina Baptista

Catarina Baptista

VITO WaterClimateHub

R&D Engineer Water

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Federal University of Viçosa

Academic researcher

Cesar Mota

Cesar Mota

Federal University of Minas Gerais

Associate Professor in the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

Inge Genné

Inge Genné (TBC)

VITO WaterClimateHub

Program Manager Water

Moderated by

Katrien  Van Hooydonk

Katrien Van Hooydonk

VITO WaterClimateHub

Project Lead Strategic Partnerships and Internationalisation

Water

Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Large amounts of untreated wastewater worldwide are still released into streams and rivers, leading to contamination of these vital water supplies. According to the UN World Water Development Report 2021, only 8% of domestic and industrial wastewater is treated in low-income countries, compared with an average of 70% in high-income countries. This poses a serious threat to public health and the environment, especially in developing countries with rapidly growing populations, where the situation is likely to get worse.

Sustainable Development Goal 6.3 focusses precisely on improved water quality, wastewater treatment and safe reuse. Nonetheless, there is growing concern around emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFAS, and viruses. Although often present in low concentrations, the impact of these pollutants is yet unclear. Monitoring is key to assess the accumulation of pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water. Monitoring wastewater streams is vital as these can be an indicator of the general health of a population.

Assessing the health risks around wastewater reuse is also crucial. First, this must be looked at from a technology perspective: how is research and innovation being applied to reuse as a safe and sustainable measure for climate adaptation? Secondly, the societal aspect: how do people feel about wastewater reuse? During this session, the panelists will present ways to balance the real and perceived health risks from water reuse and how to change the way people think about this.

Catarina Baptista

Catarina Baptista

VITO WaterClimateHub

R&D Engineer Water

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Federal University of Viçosa

Academic researcher

Cesar Mota

Cesar Mota

Federal University of Minas Gerais

Associate Professor in the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

Inge Genné

Inge Genné (TBC)

VITO WaterClimateHub

Program Manager Water

Moderated by

Katrien  Van Hooydonk

Katrien Van Hooydonk

VITO WaterClimateHub

Project Lead Strategic Partnerships and Internationalisation

Water

Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Large amounts of untreated wastewater worldwide are still released into streams and rivers, leading to contamination of these vital water supplies. According to the UN World Water Development Report 2021, only 8% of domestic and industrial wastewater is treated in low-income countries, compared with an average of 70% in high-income countries. This poses a serious threat to public health and the environment, especially in developing countries with rapidly growing populations, where the situation is likely to get worse.

Sustainable Development Goal 6.3 focusses precisely on improved water quality, wastewater treatment and safe reuse. Nonetheless, there is growing concern around emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFAS, and viruses. Although often present in low concentrations, the impact of these pollutants is yet unclear. Monitoring is key to assess the accumulation of pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water. Monitoring wastewater streams is vital as these can be an indicator of the general health of a population.

Assessing the health risks around wastewater reuse is also crucial. First, this must be looked at from a technology perspective: how is research and innovation being applied to reuse as a safe and sustainable measure for climate adaptation? Secondly, the societal aspect: how do people feel about wastewater reuse? During this session, the panelists will present ways to balance the real and perceived health risks from water reuse and how to change the way people think about this.

Catarina Baptista

Catarina Baptista

VITO WaterClimateHub

R&D Engineer Water

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Federal University of Viçosa

Academic researcher

Cesar Mota

Cesar Mota

Federal University of Minas Gerais

Associate Professor in the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

Inge Genné

Inge Genné (TBC)

VITO WaterClimateHub

Program Manager Water

Moderated by

Katrien  Van Hooydonk

Katrien Van Hooydonk

VITO WaterClimateHub

Project Lead Strategic Partnerships and Internationalisation

Water

Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Large amounts of untreated wastewater worldwide are still released into streams and rivers, leading to contamination of these vital water supplies. According to the UN World Water Development Report 2021, only 8% of domestic and industrial wastewater is treated in low-income countries, compared with an average of 70% in high-income countries. This poses a serious threat to public health and the environment, especially in developing countries with rapidly growing populations, where the situation is likely to get worse.

Sustainable Development Goal 6.3 focusses precisely on improved water quality, wastewater treatment and safe reuse. Nonetheless, there is growing concern around emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFAS, and viruses. Although often present in low concentrations, the impact of these pollutants is yet unclear. Monitoring is key to assess the accumulation of pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water. Monitoring wastewater streams is vital as these can be an indicator of the general health of a population.

Assessing the health risks around wastewater reuse is also crucial. First, this must be looked at from a technology perspective: how is research and innovation being applied to reuse as a safe and sustainable measure for climate adaptation? Secondly, the societal aspect: how do people feel about wastewater reuse? During this session, the panelists will present ways to balance the real and perceived health risks from water reuse and how to change the way people think about this.

Catarina Baptista

Catarina Baptista

VITO WaterClimateHub

R&D Engineer Water

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Federal University of Viçosa

Academic researcher

Cesar Mota

Cesar Mota

Federal University of Minas Gerais

Associate Professor in the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

Inge Genné

Inge Genné (TBC)

VITO WaterClimateHub

Program Manager Water

Moderated by

Katrien  Van Hooydonk

Katrien Van Hooydonk

VITO WaterClimateHub

Project Lead Strategic Partnerships and Internationalisation

Water

Deep dive session: Risks to health from pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Large amounts of untreated wastewater worldwide are still released into streams and rivers, leading to contamination of these vital water supplies. According to the UN World Water Development Report 2021, only 8% of domestic and industrial wastewater is treated in low-income countries, compared with an average of 70% in high-income countries. This poses a serious threat to public health and the environment, especially in developing countries with rapidly growing populations, where the situation is likely to get worse.

Sustainable Development Goal 6.3 focusses precisely on improved water quality, wastewater treatment and safe reuse. Nonetheless, there is growing concern around emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PFAS, and viruses. Although often present in low concentrations, the impact of these pollutants is yet unclear. Monitoring is key to assess the accumulation of pollutants, pathogens, and emerging contaminants in water. Monitoring wastewater streams is vital as these can be an indicator of the general health of a population.

Assessing the health risks around wastewater reuse is also crucial. First, this must be looked at from a technology perspective: how is research and innovation being applied to reuse as a safe and sustainable measure for climate adaptation? Secondly, the societal aspect: how do people feel about wastewater reuse? During this session, the panelists will present ways to balance the real and perceived health risks from water reuse and how to change the way people think about this.

Catarina Baptista

Catarina Baptista

VITO WaterClimateHub

R&D Engineer Water

Paul Campling

Paul Campling

VITO

International Business Development Manager for Environmental Research and Consultancy Projects

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Rafael Kopschitz Xavier Bastos

Federal University of Viçosa

Academic researcher

Cesar Mota

Cesar Mota

Federal University of Minas Gerais

Associate Professor in the Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

Inge Genné

Inge Genné (TBC)

VITO WaterClimateHub

Program Manager Water

Moderated by

Katrien  Van Hooydonk

Katrien Van Hooydonk

VITO WaterClimateHub

Project Lead Strategic Partnerships and Internationalisation

13:30
17:30
17:30
18:30
11:30
01:30
00:30
22:00
20:30
Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Climate

×

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

14:45
18:45
18:45
19:45
12:45
02:45
01:45
23:15
21:45
Coffee break & networking
15:00
19:00
19:00
20:00
13:00
03:00
02:00
23:30
22:00
Deep dive session

Health

16:15
20:15
20:15
21:15
14:15
04:15
03:15
00:45
23:15
Coffee & networking
16:30
20:30
20:30
21:30
14:30
04:30
03:30
01:00
23:30
Special session: Enterprises

Cross-thematic

Auditorium 2

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Energy

×

Energy

Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

According to IRENA, bioenergy from solid biomass, biogas and biomethane and liquid biofuels now constitutes a large share of renewable energy use (9% of total primary energy supply in 2019) and will continue to be a significant source of fuel for both industry and transportation.

However, it is important to note that there are challenges related to the use of biomass as an energy source. Among them is the competition over land use between crops used for animal and human food production. The seasonality inherent in the production of feedstocks used as substrates for biofuels production and the challenges related to the pre-treatment of biomass for its conversion into biofuels should also be highlighted.

This session will present case studies about biomass technology industrialization. There will be a discussion about the challenges and barriers to scaling up biomass technology, as well as the aspirations of investors and industry for large scale commercialization. The speakers will also exchange best practices and the lessons they have learned so far.

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Brazilian Association of Hydrogen

Professor

Luiz  Pereira Ramos

Luiz Pereira Ramos

Federal University of Paraná

Professor

Chenguang Wang

Chenguang Wang

Biomass Catalytic Conversion Research Group

Director

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Imperial College London

Professor

Giovani Machado

Giovani Machado

Brazilian Energy Research Office (EPE)

Director for Energy Economics and Environmental Studies

Moderated by

Suani  Coelho

Suani Coelho

São Paulo University

Professor

Energy

Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

According to IRENA, bioenergy from solid biomass, biogas and biomethane and liquid biofuels now constitutes a large share of renewable energy use (9% of total primary energy supply in 2019) and will continue to be a significant source of fuel for both industry and transportation.

However, it is important to note that there are challenges related to the use of biomass as an energy source. Among them is the competition over land use between crops used for animal and human food production. The seasonality inherent in the production of feedstocks used as substrates for biofuels production and the challenges related to the pre-treatment of biomass for its conversion into biofuels should also be highlighted.

This session will present case studies about biomass technology industrialization. There will be a discussion about the challenges and barriers to scaling up biomass technology, as well as the aspirations of investors and industry for large scale commercialization. The speakers will also exchange best practices and the lessons they have learned so far.

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Brazilian Association of Hydrogen

Professor

Luiz  Pereira Ramos

Luiz Pereira Ramos

Federal University of Paraná

Professor

Chenguang Wang

Chenguang Wang

Biomass Catalytic Conversion Research Group

Director

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Imperial College London

Professor

Giovani Machado

Giovani Machado

Brazilian Energy Research Office (EPE)

Director for Energy Economics and Environmental Studies

Moderated by

Suani  Coelho

Suani Coelho

São Paulo University

Professor

Energy

Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

According to IRENA, bioenergy from solid biomass, biogas and biomethane and liquid biofuels now constitutes a large share of renewable energy use (9% of total primary energy supply in 2019) and will continue to be a significant source of fuel for both industry and transportation.

However, it is important to note that there are challenges related to the use of biomass as an energy source. Among them is the competition over land use between crops used for animal and human food production. The seasonality inherent in the production of feedstocks used as substrates for biofuels production and the challenges related to the pre-treatment of biomass for its conversion into biofuels should also be highlighted.

This session will present case studies about biomass technology industrialization. There will be a discussion about the challenges and barriers to scaling up biomass technology, as well as the aspirations of investors and industry for large scale commercialization. The speakers will also exchange best practices and the lessons they have learned so far.

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Brazilian Association of Hydrogen

Professor

Luiz  Pereira Ramos

Luiz Pereira Ramos

Federal University of Paraná

Professor

Chenguang Wang

Chenguang Wang

Biomass Catalytic Conversion Research Group

Director

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Imperial College London

Professor

Giovani Machado

Giovani Machado

Brazilian Energy Research Office (EPE)

Director for Energy Economics and Environmental Studies

Moderated by

Suani  Coelho

Suani Coelho

São Paulo University

Professor

Energy

Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

According to IRENA, bioenergy from solid biomass, biogas and biomethane and liquid biofuels now constitutes a large share of renewable energy use (9% of total primary energy supply in 2019) and will continue to be a significant source of fuel for both industry and transportation.

However, it is important to note that there are challenges related to the use of biomass as an energy source. Among them is the competition over land use between crops used for animal and human food production. The seasonality inherent in the production of feedstocks used as substrates for biofuels production and the challenges related to the pre-treatment of biomass for its conversion into biofuels should also be highlighted.

This session will present case studies about biomass technology industrialization. There will be a discussion about the challenges and barriers to scaling up biomass technology, as well as the aspirations of investors and industry for large scale commercialization. The speakers will also exchange best practices and the lessons they have learned so far.

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Brazilian Association of Hydrogen

Professor

Luiz  Pereira Ramos

Luiz Pereira Ramos

Federal University of Paraná

Professor

Chenguang Wang

Chenguang Wang

Biomass Catalytic Conversion Research Group

Director

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Imperial College London

Professor

Giovani Machado

Giovani Machado

Brazilian Energy Research Office (EPE)

Director for Energy Economics and Environmental Studies

Moderated by

Suani  Coelho

Suani Coelho

São Paulo University

Professor

Energy

Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

According to IRENA, bioenergy from solid biomass, biogas and biomethane and liquid biofuels now constitutes a large share of renewable energy use (9% of total primary energy supply in 2019) and will continue to be a significant source of fuel for both industry and transportation.

However, it is important to note that there are challenges related to the use of biomass as an energy source. Among them is the competition over land use between crops used for animal and human food production. The seasonality inherent in the production of feedstocks used as substrates for biofuels production and the challenges related to the pre-treatment of biomass for its conversion into biofuels should also be highlighted.

This session will present case studies about biomass technology industrialization. There will be a discussion about the challenges and barriers to scaling up biomass technology, as well as the aspirations of investors and industry for large scale commercialization. The speakers will also exchange best practices and the lessons they have learned so far.

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Brazilian Association of Hydrogen

Professor

Luiz  Pereira Ramos

Luiz Pereira Ramos

Federal University of Paraná

Professor

Chenguang Wang

Chenguang Wang

Biomass Catalytic Conversion Research Group

Director

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Imperial College London

Professor

Giovani Machado

Giovani Machado

Brazilian Energy Research Office (EPE)

Director for Energy Economics and Environmental Studies

Moderated by

Suani  Coelho

Suani Coelho

São Paulo University

Professor

Energy

Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

According to IRENA, bioenergy from solid biomass, biogas and biomethane and liquid biofuels now constitutes a large share of renewable energy use (9% of total primary energy supply in 2019) and will continue to be a significant source of fuel for both industry and transportation.

However, it is important to note that there are challenges related to the use of biomass as an energy source. Among them is the competition over land use between crops used for animal and human food production. The seasonality inherent in the production of feedstocks used as substrates for biofuels production and the challenges related to the pre-treatment of biomass for its conversion into biofuels should also be highlighted.

This session will present case studies about biomass technology industrialization. There will be a discussion about the challenges and barriers to scaling up biomass technology, as well as the aspirations of investors and industry for large scale commercialization. The speakers will also exchange best practices and the lessons they have learned so far.

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Brazilian Association of Hydrogen

Professor

Luiz  Pereira Ramos

Luiz Pereira Ramos

Federal University of Paraná

Professor

Chenguang Wang

Chenguang Wang

Biomass Catalytic Conversion Research Group

Director

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Imperial College London

Professor

Giovani Machado

Giovani Machado

Brazilian Energy Research Office (EPE)

Director for Energy Economics and Environmental Studies

Moderated by

Suani  Coelho

Suani Coelho

São Paulo University

Professor

Energy

Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

According to IRENA, bioenergy from solid biomass, biogas and biomethane and liquid biofuels now constitutes a large share of renewable energy use (9% of total primary energy supply in 2019) and will continue to be a significant source of fuel for both industry and transportation.

However, it is important to note that there are challenges related to the use of biomass as an energy source. Among them is the competition over land use between crops used for animal and human food production. The seasonality inherent in the production of feedstocks used as substrates for biofuels production and the challenges related to the pre-treatment of biomass for its conversion into biofuels should also be highlighted.

This session will present case studies about biomass technology industrialization. There will be a discussion about the challenges and barriers to scaling up biomass technology, as well as the aspirations of investors and industry for large scale commercialization. The speakers will also exchange best practices and the lessons they have learned so far.

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Brazilian Association of Hydrogen

Professor

Luiz  Pereira Ramos

Luiz Pereira Ramos

Federal University of Paraná

Professor

Chenguang Wang

Chenguang Wang

Biomass Catalytic Conversion Research Group

Director

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Imperial College London

Professor

Giovani Machado

Giovani Machado

Brazilian Energy Research Office (EPE)

Director for Energy Economics and Environmental Studies

Moderated by

Suani  Coelho

Suani Coelho

São Paulo University

Professor

Energy

Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

According to IRENA, bioenergy from solid biomass, biogas and biomethane and liquid biofuels now constitutes a large share of renewable energy use (9% of total primary energy supply in 2019) and will continue to be a significant source of fuel for both industry and transportation.

However, it is important to note that there are challenges related to the use of biomass as an energy source. Among them is the competition over land use between crops used for animal and human food production. The seasonality inherent in the production of feedstocks used as substrates for biofuels production and the challenges related to the pre-treatment of biomass for its conversion into biofuels should also be highlighted.

This session will present case studies about biomass technology industrialization. There will be a discussion about the challenges and barriers to scaling up biomass technology, as well as the aspirations of investors and industry for large scale commercialization. The speakers will also exchange best practices and the lessons they have learned so far.

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Brazilian Association of Hydrogen

Professor

Luiz  Pereira Ramos

Luiz Pereira Ramos

Federal University of Paraná

Professor

Chenguang Wang

Chenguang Wang

Biomass Catalytic Conversion Research Group

Director

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Imperial College London

Professor

Giovani Machado

Giovani Machado

Brazilian Energy Research Office (EPE)

Director for Energy Economics and Environmental Studies

Moderated by

Suani  Coelho

Suani Coelho

São Paulo University

Professor

Energy

Deep dive session: Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

According to IRENA, bioenergy from solid biomass, biogas and biomethane and liquid biofuels now constitutes a large share of renewable energy use (9% of total primary energy supply in 2019) and will continue to be a significant source of fuel for both industry and transportation.

However, it is important to note that there are challenges related to the use of biomass as an energy source. Among them is the competition over land use between crops used for animal and human food production. The seasonality inherent in the production of feedstocks used as substrates for biofuels production and the challenges related to the pre-treatment of biomass for its conversion into biofuels should also be highlighted.

This session will present case studies about biomass technology industrialization. There will be a discussion about the challenges and barriers to scaling up biomass technology, as well as the aspirations of investors and industry for large scale commercialization. The speakers will also exchange best practices and the lessons they have learned so far.

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Paulo Emilio Valadão de Miranda

Brazilian Association of Hydrogen

Professor

Luiz  Pereira Ramos

Luiz Pereira Ramos

Federal University of Paraná

Professor

Chenguang Wang

Chenguang Wang

Biomass Catalytic Conversion Research Group

Director

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Rocio A. Diaz-Chavez

Imperial College London

Professor

Giovani Machado

Giovani Machado

Brazilian Energy Research Office (EPE)

Director for Energy Economics and Environmental Studies

Moderated by

Suani  Coelho

Suani Coelho

São Paulo University

Professor

10:15
14:15
14:15
15:15
08:15
22:15
21:15
18:45
17:15
Coffee break & networking
10:30
14:30
14:30
15:30
08:30
22:30
21:30
19:00
17:30
Deep dive session: The future of renewable energy

Energy

×

Energy

Deep dive session: The future of renewable energy

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

The widespread use of renewable energy is an essential component of sustainable development. However, what works in one country or region may not work so well in a different part of the world, due to the available resources or other bottlenecks that inhibit renewable energy utilization.

The Renewable Energy Comprehensive Utilization System aims to solve the technical bottlenecks and model issues of unstable resource supplies, low conversion rates, the low degree of multi-energy complementarity, and the mismatching of application scenarios. By opening up a complete innovation chain from basic research and core technology breakthroughs to industrial applications, the Renewable Energy Utilization System is going to  improve the coupling between renewable energy and its applications.

This session will cover key coupling technologies and potential application scenarios for renewable energy utilization.

Yueqing Wang

Yueqing Wang

China Power International Holding Limited, SPIC

Director-General

Maurício  Tolmasquim

Maurício Tolmasquim

Energy Research Office (EPE)

CEO

José Cardemil

José Cardemil

Catholic University of Chile

Professor

Moderated by

Segen Farid  Estefen

Segen Farid Estefen

National Ocean Institute (Inmar) & COPPE Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Director

Energy

Deep dive session: The future of renewable energy

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

The widespread use of renewable energy is an essential component of sustainable development. However, what works in one country or region may not work so well in a different part of the world, due to the available resources or other bottlenecks that inhibit renewable energy utilization.

The Renewable Energy Comprehensive Utilization System aims to solve the technical bottlenecks and model issues of unstable resource supplies, low conversion rates, the low degree of multi-energy complementarity, and the mismatching of application scenarios. By opening up a complete innovation chain from basic research and core technology breakthroughs to industrial applications, the Renewable Energy Utilization System is going to  improve the coupling between renewable energy and its applications.

This session will cover key coupling technologies and potential application scenarios for renewable energy utilization.

Yueqing Wang

Yueqing Wang

China Power International Holding Limited, SPIC

Director-General

Maurício  Tolmasquim

Maurício Tolmasquim

Energy Research Office (EPE)

CEO

José Cardemil

José Cardemil

Catholic University of Chile

Professor

Moderated by

Segen Farid  Estefen

Segen Farid Estefen

National Ocean Institute (Inmar) & COPPE Advanced biomass technologies for carbon neutrality goals

Director