Programme overview

G-STIC Conference February 2023

Sessions labeled will take place in EXPO MAG, the Convention Center in Rio de Janeiro. Sessions labeled will be live-streamed from Rio de Janeiro and can be followed online.

Show session times in local time zone

Main auditorium

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Special session: Amazon forest

Cross-thematic

10:15
14:15
14:15
15:15
08:15
22:15
21:15
18:45
17:15
Coffee break & networking
10:30
14:30
14:30
15:30
08:30
22:30
21:30
19:00
17:30
Side event: Global Solutions Forum organized by SDSN

12:00
16:00
16:00
17:00
10:00
00:00
23:00
20:30
19:00
Brunch & networking
13:45
17:45
17:45
18:45
11:45
01:45
00:45
22:15
20:45
Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Cross-thematic

×

Cross-thematic

Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Share this session

15 February 2023, 13:45 - 15:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 18:45 - 20:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 11:45 - 13:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 01:45 - 03:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 00:45 - 02:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 22:15 - 23:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 20:45 - 22:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the carbon and nutrients that fuel our bodies rely on biodiversity. More than half of the world’s GDP is moderately or highly dependent on nature and its ecosystem services and 80% of the medicines produced in developing countries are plant-based. This is why the huge loss of biodiversity we are witnessing, the sixth global mass extinction, represents a crisis with as terrifying proportions as climate change.

It is vital that we preserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity. Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can be leveraged to develop instruments to protect, manage, and foster the sustainable use of biodiversity. In addition, by preserving biodiversity and investing in nature-based solutions (NbS), it is possible to enhance climate change mitigation actions such as carbon sequestration and protection against deforestation and land degradation.

This session will discuss the challenges embedded in the seek for sustainable biodiversity use. The panelist will debate the instruments needed to guide this pathway with justice, rights, and equity. They will look at the existing mechanisms for curbing the overexploitation of natural resources and biodiversity loss as essential means to securing all forms of life on Earth.

Keynote speech

Samela Sateré Mawé

Samela Sateré Mawé (TBC)

Brazilian Indigenous youth activist

Elizabeth Mrema

Elizabeth Mrema (TBC)

Convention on Biological Diversity

Executive Secretary

Panel discussion

Marina Silva

Marina Silva (TBC)

former Brazilian Environmental Minister

Jacqueline Alvarez

Jacqueline Alvarez (TBC)

UNEP

ALAC Regional Director

Sechaba Bareetseng

Sechaba Bareetseng

Programme Manager, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Márcia Chame

Márcia Chame

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Researcher

Bardha Von Kappelgaard

Bardha Von Kappelgaard (TBC)

World Climate Foundation

Project Director

Martien van Nieuwkoop

Martien van Nieuwkoop (TBC)

World Bank

Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice

Moderated by

Virgílio Viana

Virgílio Viana (TBC)

Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS)

General Superintendent

Cross-thematic

Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Share this session

15 February 2023, 13:45 - 15:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 18:45 - 20:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 11:45 - 13:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 01:45 - 03:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 00:45 - 02:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 22:15 - 23:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 20:45 - 22:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the carbon and nutrients that fuel our bodies rely on biodiversity. More than half of the world’s GDP is moderately or highly dependent on nature and its ecosystem services and 80% of the medicines produced in developing countries are plant-based. This is why the huge loss of biodiversity we are witnessing, the sixth global mass extinction, represents a crisis with as terrifying proportions as climate change.

It is vital that we preserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity. Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can be leveraged to develop instruments to protect, manage, and foster the sustainable use of biodiversity. In addition, by preserving biodiversity and investing in nature-based solutions (NbS), it is possible to enhance climate change mitigation actions such as carbon sequestration and protection against deforestation and land degradation.

This session will discuss the challenges embedded in the seek for sustainable biodiversity use. The panelist will debate the instruments needed to guide this pathway with justice, rights, and equity. They will look at the existing mechanisms for curbing the overexploitation of natural resources and biodiversity loss as essential means to securing all forms of life on Earth.

Keynote speech

Samela Sateré Mawé

Samela Sateré Mawé (TBC)

Brazilian Indigenous youth activist

Elizabeth Mrema

Elizabeth Mrema (TBC)

Convention on Biological Diversity

Executive Secretary

Panel discussion

Marina Silva

Marina Silva (TBC)

former Brazilian Environmental Minister

Jacqueline Alvarez

Jacqueline Alvarez (TBC)

UNEP

ALAC Regional Director

Sechaba Bareetseng

Sechaba Bareetseng

Programme Manager, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Márcia Chame

Márcia Chame

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Researcher

Bardha Von Kappelgaard

Bardha Von Kappelgaard (TBC)

World Climate Foundation

Project Director

Martien van Nieuwkoop

Martien van Nieuwkoop (TBC)

World Bank

Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice

Moderated by

Virgílio Viana

Virgílio Viana (TBC)

Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS)

General Superintendent

Cross-thematic

Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Share this session

15 February 2023, 13:45 - 15:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 18:45 - 20:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 11:45 - 13:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 01:45 - 03:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 00:45 - 02:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 22:15 - 23:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 20:45 - 22:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the carbon and nutrients that fuel our bodies rely on biodiversity. More than half of the world’s GDP is moderately or highly dependent on nature and its ecosystem services and 80% of the medicines produced in developing countries are plant-based. This is why the huge loss of biodiversity we are witnessing, the sixth global mass extinction, represents a crisis with as terrifying proportions as climate change.

It is vital that we preserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity. Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can be leveraged to develop instruments to protect, manage, and foster the sustainable use of biodiversity. In addition, by preserving biodiversity and investing in nature-based solutions (NbS), it is possible to enhance climate change mitigation actions such as carbon sequestration and protection against deforestation and land degradation.

This session will discuss the challenges embedded in the seek for sustainable biodiversity use. The panelist will debate the instruments needed to guide this pathway with justice, rights, and equity. They will look at the existing mechanisms for curbing the overexploitation of natural resources and biodiversity loss as essential means to securing all forms of life on Earth.

Keynote speech

Samela Sateré Mawé

Samela Sateré Mawé (TBC)

Brazilian Indigenous youth activist

Elizabeth Mrema

Elizabeth Mrema (TBC)

Convention on Biological Diversity

Executive Secretary

Panel discussion

Marina Silva

Marina Silva (TBC)

former Brazilian Environmental Minister

Jacqueline Alvarez

Jacqueline Alvarez (TBC)

UNEP

ALAC Regional Director

Sechaba Bareetseng

Sechaba Bareetseng

Programme Manager, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Márcia Chame

Márcia Chame

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Researcher

Bardha Von Kappelgaard

Bardha Von Kappelgaard (TBC)

World Climate Foundation

Project Director

Martien van Nieuwkoop

Martien van Nieuwkoop (TBC)

World Bank

Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice

Moderated by

Virgílio Viana

Virgílio Viana (TBC)

Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS)

General Superintendent

Cross-thematic

Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Share this session

15 February 2023, 13:45 - 15:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 18:45 - 20:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 11:45 - 13:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 01:45 - 03:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 00:45 - 02:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 22:15 - 23:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 20:45 - 22:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the carbon and nutrients that fuel our bodies rely on biodiversity. More than half of the world’s GDP is moderately or highly dependent on nature and its ecosystem services and 80% of the medicines produced in developing countries are plant-based. This is why the huge loss of biodiversity we are witnessing, the sixth global mass extinction, represents a crisis with as terrifying proportions as climate change.

It is vital that we preserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity. Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can be leveraged to develop instruments to protect, manage, and foster the sustainable use of biodiversity. In addition, by preserving biodiversity and investing in nature-based solutions (NbS), it is possible to enhance climate change mitigation actions such as carbon sequestration and protection against deforestation and land degradation.

This session will discuss the challenges embedded in the seek for sustainable biodiversity use. The panelist will debate the instruments needed to guide this pathway with justice, rights, and equity. They will look at the existing mechanisms for curbing the overexploitation of natural resources and biodiversity loss as essential means to securing all forms of life on Earth.

Keynote speech

Samela Sateré Mawé

Samela Sateré Mawé (TBC)

Brazilian Indigenous youth activist

Elizabeth Mrema

Elizabeth Mrema (TBC)

Convention on Biological Diversity

Executive Secretary

Panel discussion

Marina Silva

Marina Silva (TBC)

former Brazilian Environmental Minister

Jacqueline Alvarez

Jacqueline Alvarez (TBC)

UNEP

ALAC Regional Director

Sechaba Bareetseng

Sechaba Bareetseng

Programme Manager, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Márcia Chame

Márcia Chame

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Researcher

Bardha Von Kappelgaard

Bardha Von Kappelgaard (TBC)

World Climate Foundation

Project Director

Martien van Nieuwkoop

Martien van Nieuwkoop (TBC)

World Bank

Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice

Moderated by

Virgílio Viana

Virgílio Viana (TBC)

Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS)

General Superintendent

Cross-thematic

Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Share this session

15 February 2023, 13:45 - 15:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 18:45 - 20:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 11:45 - 13:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 01:45 - 03:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 00:45 - 02:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 22:15 - 23:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 20:45 - 22:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the carbon and nutrients that fuel our bodies rely on biodiversity. More than half of the world’s GDP is moderately or highly dependent on nature and its ecosystem services and 80% of the medicines produced in developing countries are plant-based. This is why the huge loss of biodiversity we are witnessing, the sixth global mass extinction, represents a crisis with as terrifying proportions as climate change.

It is vital that we preserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity. Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can be leveraged to develop instruments to protect, manage, and foster the sustainable use of biodiversity. In addition, by preserving biodiversity and investing in nature-based solutions (NbS), it is possible to enhance climate change mitigation actions such as carbon sequestration and protection against deforestation and land degradation.

This session will discuss the challenges embedded in the seek for sustainable biodiversity use. The panelist will debate the instruments needed to guide this pathway with justice, rights, and equity. They will look at the existing mechanisms for curbing the overexploitation of natural resources and biodiversity loss as essential means to securing all forms of life on Earth.

Keynote speech

Samela Sateré Mawé

Samela Sateré Mawé (TBC)

Brazilian Indigenous youth activist

Elizabeth Mrema

Elizabeth Mrema (TBC)

Convention on Biological Diversity

Executive Secretary

Panel discussion

Marina Silva

Marina Silva (TBC)

former Brazilian Environmental Minister

Jacqueline Alvarez

Jacqueline Alvarez (TBC)

UNEP

ALAC Regional Director

Sechaba Bareetseng

Sechaba Bareetseng

Programme Manager, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Márcia Chame

Márcia Chame

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Researcher

Bardha Von Kappelgaard

Bardha Von Kappelgaard (TBC)

World Climate Foundation

Project Director

Martien van Nieuwkoop

Martien van Nieuwkoop (TBC)

World Bank

Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice

Moderated by

Virgílio Viana

Virgílio Viana (TBC)

Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS)

General Superintendent

Cross-thematic

Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Share this session

15 February 2023, 13:45 - 15:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 18:45 - 20:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 11:45 - 13:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 01:45 - 03:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 00:45 - 02:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 22:15 - 23:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 20:45 - 22:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the carbon and nutrients that fuel our bodies rely on biodiversity. More than half of the world’s GDP is moderately or highly dependent on nature and its ecosystem services and 80% of the medicines produced in developing countries are plant-based. This is why the huge loss of biodiversity we are witnessing, the sixth global mass extinction, represents a crisis with as terrifying proportions as climate change.

It is vital that we preserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity. Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can be leveraged to develop instruments to protect, manage, and foster the sustainable use of biodiversity. In addition, by preserving biodiversity and investing in nature-based solutions (NbS), it is possible to enhance climate change mitigation actions such as carbon sequestration and protection against deforestation and land degradation.

This session will discuss the challenges embedded in the seek for sustainable biodiversity use. The panelist will debate the instruments needed to guide this pathway with justice, rights, and equity. They will look at the existing mechanisms for curbing the overexploitation of natural resources and biodiversity loss as essential means to securing all forms of life on Earth.

Keynote speech

Samela Sateré Mawé

Samela Sateré Mawé (TBC)

Brazilian Indigenous youth activist

Elizabeth Mrema

Elizabeth Mrema (TBC)

Convention on Biological Diversity

Executive Secretary

Panel discussion

Marina Silva

Marina Silva (TBC)

former Brazilian Environmental Minister

Jacqueline Alvarez

Jacqueline Alvarez (TBC)

UNEP

ALAC Regional Director

Sechaba Bareetseng

Sechaba Bareetseng

Programme Manager, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Márcia Chame

Márcia Chame

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Researcher

Bardha Von Kappelgaard

Bardha Von Kappelgaard (TBC)

World Climate Foundation

Project Director

Martien van Nieuwkoop

Martien van Nieuwkoop (TBC)

World Bank

Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice

Moderated by

Virgílio Viana

Virgílio Viana (TBC)

Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS)

General Superintendent

Cross-thematic

Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Share this session

15 February 2023, 13:45 - 15:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 18:45 - 20:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 11:45 - 13:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 01:45 - 03:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 00:45 - 02:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 22:15 - 23:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 20:45 - 22:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the carbon and nutrients that fuel our bodies rely on biodiversity. More than half of the world’s GDP is moderately or highly dependent on nature and its ecosystem services and 80% of the medicines produced in developing countries are plant-based. This is why the huge loss of biodiversity we are witnessing, the sixth global mass extinction, represents a crisis with as terrifying proportions as climate change.

It is vital that we preserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity. Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can be leveraged to develop instruments to protect, manage, and foster the sustainable use of biodiversity. In addition, by preserving biodiversity and investing in nature-based solutions (NbS), it is possible to enhance climate change mitigation actions such as carbon sequestration and protection against deforestation and land degradation.

This session will discuss the challenges embedded in the seek for sustainable biodiversity use. The panelist will debate the instruments needed to guide this pathway with justice, rights, and equity. They will look at the existing mechanisms for curbing the overexploitation of natural resources and biodiversity loss as essential means to securing all forms of life on Earth.

Keynote speech

Samela Sateré Mawé

Samela Sateré Mawé (TBC)

Brazilian Indigenous youth activist

Elizabeth Mrema

Elizabeth Mrema (TBC)

Convention on Biological Diversity

Executive Secretary

Panel discussion

Marina Silva

Marina Silva (TBC)

former Brazilian Environmental Minister

Jacqueline Alvarez

Jacqueline Alvarez (TBC)

UNEP

ALAC Regional Director

Sechaba Bareetseng

Sechaba Bareetseng

Programme Manager, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Márcia Chame

Márcia Chame

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Researcher

Bardha Von Kappelgaard

Bardha Von Kappelgaard (TBC)

World Climate Foundation

Project Director

Martien van Nieuwkoop

Martien van Nieuwkoop (TBC)

World Bank

Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice

Moderated by

Virgílio Viana

Virgílio Viana (TBC)

Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS)

General Superintendent

Cross-thematic

Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Share this session

15 February 2023, 13:45 - 15:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 18:45 - 20:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 11:45 - 13:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 01:45 - 03:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 00:45 - 02:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 22:15 - 23:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 20:45 - 22:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the carbon and nutrients that fuel our bodies rely on biodiversity. More than half of the world’s GDP is moderately or highly dependent on nature and its ecosystem services and 80% of the medicines produced in developing countries are plant-based. This is why the huge loss of biodiversity we are witnessing, the sixth global mass extinction, represents a crisis with as terrifying proportions as climate change.

It is vital that we preserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity. Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can be leveraged to develop instruments to protect, manage, and foster the sustainable use of biodiversity. In addition, by preserving biodiversity and investing in nature-based solutions (NbS), it is possible to enhance climate change mitigation actions such as carbon sequestration and protection against deforestation and land degradation.

This session will discuss the challenges embedded in the seek for sustainable biodiversity use. The panelist will debate the instruments needed to guide this pathway with justice, rights, and equity. They will look at the existing mechanisms for curbing the overexploitation of natural resources and biodiversity loss as essential means to securing all forms of life on Earth.

Keynote speech

Samela Sateré Mawé

Samela Sateré Mawé (TBC)

Brazilian Indigenous youth activist

Elizabeth Mrema

Elizabeth Mrema (TBC)

Convention on Biological Diversity

Executive Secretary

Panel discussion

Marina Silva

Marina Silva (TBC)

former Brazilian Environmental Minister

Jacqueline Alvarez

Jacqueline Alvarez (TBC)

UNEP

ALAC Regional Director

Sechaba Bareetseng

Sechaba Bareetseng

Programme Manager, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Márcia Chame

Márcia Chame

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Researcher

Bardha Von Kappelgaard

Bardha Von Kappelgaard (TBC)

World Climate Foundation

Project Director

Martien van Nieuwkoop

Martien van Nieuwkoop (TBC)

World Bank

Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice

Moderated by

Virgílio Viana

Virgílio Viana (TBC)

Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS)

General Superintendent

Cross-thematic

Plenary session: Biodiversity – We are all nature

Share this session

15 February 2023, 13:45 - 15:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 17:45 - 19:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 18:45 - 20:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 11:45 - 13:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 01:45 - 03:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 00:45 - 02:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 22:15 - 23:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 20:45 - 22:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

Without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the carbon and nutrients that fuel our bodies rely on biodiversity. More than half of the world’s GDP is moderately or highly dependent on nature and its ecosystem services and 80% of the medicines produced in developing countries are plant-based. This is why the huge loss of biodiversity we are witnessing, the sixth global mass extinction, represents a crisis with as terrifying proportions as climate change.

It is vital that we preserve Earth’s remaining biodiversity. Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can be leveraged to develop instruments to protect, manage, and foster the sustainable use of biodiversity. In addition, by preserving biodiversity and investing in nature-based solutions (NbS), it is possible to enhance climate change mitigation actions such as carbon sequestration and protection against deforestation and land degradation.

This session will discuss the challenges embedded in the seek for sustainable biodiversity use. The panelist will debate the instruments needed to guide this pathway with justice, rights, and equity. They will look at the existing mechanisms for curbing the overexploitation of natural resources and biodiversity loss as essential means to securing all forms of life on Earth.

Keynote speech

Samela Sateré Mawé

Samela Sateré Mawé (TBC)

Brazilian Indigenous youth activist

Elizabeth Mrema

Elizabeth Mrema (TBC)

Convention on Biological Diversity

Executive Secretary

Panel discussion

Marina Silva

Marina Silva (TBC)

former Brazilian Environmental Minister

Jacqueline Alvarez

Jacqueline Alvarez (TBC)

UNEP

ALAC Regional Director

Sechaba Bareetseng

Sechaba Bareetseng

Programme Manager, Indigenous Knowledge Systems, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

Márcia Chame

Márcia Chame

Oswaldo Cruz Foundation

Researcher

Bardha Von Kappelgaard

Bardha Von Kappelgaard (TBC)

World Climate Foundation

Project Director

Martien van Nieuwkoop

Martien van Nieuwkoop (TBC)

World Bank

Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice

Moderated by

Virgílio Viana

Virgílio Viana (TBC)

Sustainable Amazon Foundation (FAS)

General Superintendent

15:00
19:00
19:00
20:00
13:00
03:00
02:00
23:30
22:00
High-level closing ceremony

Cross-thematic

16:30
20:30
20:30
21:30
14:30
04:30
03:30
01:00
23:30
Farewell with artistic event

Auditorium 1

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Climate

×

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

10:15
14:15
14:15
15:15
08:15
22:15
21:15
18:45
17:15
Coffee break & networking
10:30
14:30
14:30
15:30
08:30
22:30
21:30
19:00
17:30
Deep dive session

Climate

Auditorium 2

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Deep dive session

Oceans

10:15
14:15
14:15
15:15
08:15
22:15
21:15
18:45
17:15
Coffee break & networking
10:30
14:30
14:30
15:30
08:30
22:30
21:30
19:00
17:30
Deep dive session

Oceans

Auditorium 3

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Side event: Vaccines