LOOKING AT CLIMATE CHANGE FROM DIFFERENT ANGLES

Mitigation and adaptation technologies to protect life on Earth

Climate change is threatening the foundations of our existence. The observed global mean surface temperature has increased by 0.18°C each decade since 1970, reflecting the long-term warming trend seen since pre-industrial times. The effects of this are clearly evident.

Sea levels are on the rise and the oceans are becoming more acidic, consequences that are having devastating impacts on coastal countries, especially the least developed countries and small island states. More frequent and more intense natural disasters are threatening the natural ecosystems on which humanity relies to the point where we are facing threats to water and food security, health, and widescale property losses.

To successfully limit the global temperature rise to 1.5°C, and to protect ourselves and the Earth’s ecosystems from the consequences of climate change, we need to accelerate and scale up the use of mitigation and adaptation technologies.

Conference programme

Climate

Sessions labeled will take place in EXPO MAG, the Convention Center in Rio de Janeiro. Sessions labeled will be live-streamed from Rio de Janeiro and can be followed online.

Show session times in local time zone

14 February 2023

10:30
14:30
14:30
15:30
08:30
22:30
21:30
19:00
17:30
Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Climate

×

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

Climate

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Main auditorium & online

An unprecedented amount of climate finance needs to be mobilized. Several countries are updating their NDCs to reflect their increased climate ambitions and this is going to require more funding. Unlocking climate finance is the best way to accelerate NDC implementation and drive transformative action because global progress on NDC implementation is lacking. In order to advance transformation, the recently launched UNFCCC Technology Mechanism aims at guiding the necessary societal change.

Although access to climate financing is improving, it is still one of the biggest constraints to the widescale implementation of NDCs. Access to financing for climate action is one of the most frequently requested areas of support among NDC partnership countries. Providing support to those countries building the economic case for climate-relevant and bankable projects should therefore be a priority.

There is an obvious gap between the amount of money promised for international climate finance and the amount that is actually available. This plenary session looks at the barriers to accessing financing for climate projects and aims to provide some answers on how to unlock the funds available for accelerated implementation of transformative technological solutions.

Manuel Heitor

H.E. Manuel Heitor

Portugal

former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Rose  Mwebaza

Rose Mwebaza

CTCN

Director

Leen  Govaerts

Leen Govaerts

VITO

Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Chaired by

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real

UNFCCC TEC

Chair

13:30
17:30
17:30
18:30
11:30
01:30
00:30
22:00
20:30
Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Climate

×

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

Climate

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. However, many developing countries lack sufficient resources to adapt to and mitigate the impacts it brings. To support developing countries in the fight against climate change, the Government of Flanders launched the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021. This programme is in line with the statements by UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, which call for financial assistance for the most vulnerable countries.

By providing financial support to  climate change adaptation and mitigation projects, the G-STIC Climate Action Programme aims to strengthen the implementation of climate policies, strategies, regulations, and action plans in developing countries.

The first call of the G-STIC Climate Action Programme in 2021 resulted in 65 project proposals. Thirteen projects were approved with a total budget of €4,793,547 (€3,213,225 subsidy). For the second project call, the Government of Flanders provides grants worth €15,88 million. This call closed in September 2022.

The speakers will present case studies of some approved projects from the G-STIC Climate Action Programme and  highlight the impact of climate finance on governments, private organisations, research organisations, and NGOs.

Stijn De Jonge

Stijn De Jonge (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Co-Founder

Carlos Alexander

Carlos Alexander (TBC)

EXTRAQT

Walter Buydens

Walter Buydens (TBC)

Turbulent

CEO

16:30
20:30
20:30
21:30
14:30
04:30
03:30
01:00
23:30
Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Climate

×

Climate

Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 16:30 - 17:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 22:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 15:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 04:30 - 05:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 03:30 - 04:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 01:00 - 02:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 23:30 - 00:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

In the past few years, the majority of new climate technology and innovations have been aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation). However, we are experiencing more and more climate change impacts, evidenced by melting glaciers, droughts, heatwaves, floods, and other extreme weather events. This clearly indicates the pressing need to adapt and build resilience.

Technologies and innovation could help, in particular those that offer a transformative – instead of an incremental – approach to adaptation. These could include, for example, ways of creating of integrated natural coastal buffers or a sophisticated early warning system that would allow a coordinated response and quicker mobilization during a disaster. A transformative approach would require innovative thinking beyond the status-quo, engagement of key stakeholders along the process chain, and investments in capacity and other resources.

Building on TEC and YOUNGO’s session at G-STIC 2022 Dubai on youth-led initiatives, this session will identify innovative solutions and emerging and transformational adaptation technologies. It will cover the role of communities, finance and the private sector in supporting the deployment of these transformational technologies to build better resilience and enhance adaptation to climate change.

This session is hosted by UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee, YOUNGO, and the Women and Gender Constituency.

Climate

Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 16:30 - 17:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 22:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 15:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 04:30 - 05:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 03:30 - 04:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 01:00 - 02:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 23:30 - 00:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

In the past few years, the majority of new climate technology and innovations have been aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation). However, we are experiencing more and more climate change impacts, evidenced by melting glaciers, droughts, heatwaves, floods, and other extreme weather events. This clearly indicates the pressing need to adapt and build resilience.

Technologies and innovation could help, in particular those that offer a transformative – instead of an incremental – approach to adaptation. These could include, for example, ways of creating of integrated natural coastal buffers or a sophisticated early warning system that would allow a coordinated response and quicker mobilization during a disaster. A transformative approach would require innovative thinking beyond the status-quo, engagement of key stakeholders along the process chain, and investments in capacity and other resources.

Building on TEC and YOUNGO’s session at G-STIC 2022 Dubai on youth-led initiatives, this session will identify innovative solutions and emerging and transformational adaptation technologies. It will cover the role of communities, finance and the private sector in supporting the deployment of these transformational technologies to build better resilience and enhance adaptation to climate change.

This session is hosted by UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee, YOUNGO, and the Women and Gender Constituency.

Climate

Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 16:30 - 17:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 22:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 15:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 04:30 - 05:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 03:30 - 04:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 01:00 - 02:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 23:30 - 00:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

In the past few years, the majority of new climate technology and innovations have been aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation). However, we are experiencing more and more climate change impacts, evidenced by melting glaciers, droughts, heatwaves, floods, and other extreme weather events. This clearly indicates the pressing need to adapt and build resilience.

Technologies and innovation could help, in particular those that offer a transformative – instead of an incremental – approach to adaptation. These could include, for example, ways of creating of integrated natural coastal buffers or a sophisticated early warning system that would allow a coordinated response and quicker mobilization during a disaster. A transformative approach would require innovative thinking beyond the status-quo, engagement of key stakeholders along the process chain, and investments in capacity and other resources.

Building on TEC and YOUNGO’s session at G-STIC 2022 Dubai on youth-led initiatives, this session will identify innovative solutions and emerging and transformational adaptation technologies. It will cover the role of communities, finance and the private sector in supporting the deployment of these transformational technologies to build better resilience and enhance adaptation to climate change.

This session is hosted by UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee, YOUNGO, and the Women and Gender Constituency.

Climate

Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 16:30 - 17:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 22:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 15:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 04:30 - 05:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 03:30 - 04:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 01:00 - 02:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 23:30 - 00:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

In the past few years, the majority of new climate technology and innovations have been aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation). However, we are experiencing more and more climate change impacts, evidenced by melting glaciers, droughts, heatwaves, floods, and other extreme weather events. This clearly indicates the pressing need to adapt and build resilience.

Technologies and innovation could help, in particular those that offer a transformative – instead of an incremental – approach to adaptation. These could include, for example, ways of creating of integrated natural coastal buffers or a sophisticated early warning system that would allow a coordinated response and quicker mobilization during a disaster. A transformative approach would require innovative thinking beyond the status-quo, engagement of key stakeholders along the process chain, and investments in capacity and other resources.

Building on TEC and YOUNGO’s session at G-STIC 2022 Dubai on youth-led initiatives, this session will identify innovative solutions and emerging and transformational adaptation technologies. It will cover the role of communities, finance and the private sector in supporting the deployment of these transformational technologies to build better resilience and enhance adaptation to climate change.

This session is hosted by UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee, YOUNGO, and the Women and Gender Constituency.

Climate

Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 16:30 - 17:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 22:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 15:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 04:30 - 05:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 03:30 - 04:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 01:00 - 02:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 23:30 - 00:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

In the past few years, the majority of new climate technology and innovations have been aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation). However, we are experiencing more and more climate change impacts, evidenced by melting glaciers, droughts, heatwaves, floods, and other extreme weather events. This clearly indicates the pressing need to adapt and build resilience.

Technologies and innovation could help, in particular those that offer a transformative – instead of an incremental – approach to adaptation. These could include, for example, ways of creating of integrated natural coastal buffers or a sophisticated early warning system that would allow a coordinated response and quicker mobilization during a disaster. A transformative approach would require innovative thinking beyond the status-quo, engagement of key stakeholders along the process chain, and investments in capacity and other resources.

Building on TEC and YOUNGO’s session at G-STIC 2022 Dubai on youth-led initiatives, this session will identify innovative solutions and emerging and transformational adaptation technologies. It will cover the role of communities, finance and the private sector in supporting the deployment of these transformational technologies to build better resilience and enhance adaptation to climate change.

This session is hosted by UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee, YOUNGO, and the Women and Gender Constituency.

Climate

Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 16:30 - 17:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 22:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 15:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 04:30 - 05:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 03:30 - 04:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 01:00 - 02:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 23:30 - 00:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

In the past few years, the majority of new climate technology and innovations have been aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation). However, we are experiencing more and more climate change impacts, evidenced by melting glaciers, droughts, heatwaves, floods, and other extreme weather events. This clearly indicates the pressing need to adapt and build resilience.

Technologies and innovation could help, in particular those that offer a transformative – instead of an incremental – approach to adaptation. These could include, for example, ways of creating of integrated natural coastal buffers or a sophisticated early warning system that would allow a coordinated response and quicker mobilization during a disaster. A transformative approach would require innovative thinking beyond the status-quo, engagement of key stakeholders along the process chain, and investments in capacity and other resources.

Building on TEC and YOUNGO’s session at G-STIC 2022 Dubai on youth-led initiatives, this session will identify innovative solutions and emerging and transformational adaptation technologies. It will cover the role of communities, finance and the private sector in supporting the deployment of these transformational technologies to build better resilience and enhance adaptation to climate change.

This session is hosted by UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee, YOUNGO, and the Women and Gender Constituency.

Climate

Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 16:30 - 17:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 22:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 15:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 04:30 - 05:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 03:30 - 04:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 01:00 - 02:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 23:30 - 00:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

In the past few years, the majority of new climate technology and innovations have been aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation). However, we are experiencing more and more climate change impacts, evidenced by melting glaciers, droughts, heatwaves, floods, and other extreme weather events. This clearly indicates the pressing need to adapt and build resilience.

Technologies and innovation could help, in particular those that offer a transformative – instead of an incremental – approach to adaptation. These could include, for example, ways of creating of integrated natural coastal buffers or a sophisticated early warning system that would allow a coordinated response and quicker mobilization during a disaster. A transformative approach would require innovative thinking beyond the status-quo, engagement of key stakeholders along the process chain, and investments in capacity and other resources.

Building on TEC and YOUNGO’s session at G-STIC 2022 Dubai on youth-led initiatives, this session will identify innovative solutions and emerging and transformational adaptation technologies. It will cover the role of communities, finance and the private sector in supporting the deployment of these transformational technologies to build better resilience and enhance adaptation to climate change.

This session is hosted by UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee, YOUNGO, and the Women and Gender Constituency.

Climate

Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 16:30 - 17:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 22:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 15:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 04:30 - 05:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 03:30 - 04:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 01:00 - 02:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 23:30 - 00:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

In the past few years, the majority of new climate technology and innovations have been aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation). However, we are experiencing more and more climate change impacts, evidenced by melting glaciers, droughts, heatwaves, floods, and other extreme weather events. This clearly indicates the pressing need to adapt and build resilience.

Technologies and innovation could help, in particular those that offer a transformative – instead of an incremental – approach to adaptation. These could include, for example, ways of creating of integrated natural coastal buffers or a sophisticated early warning system that would allow a coordinated response and quicker mobilization during a disaster. A transformative approach would require innovative thinking beyond the status-quo, engagement of key stakeholders along the process chain, and investments in capacity and other resources.

Building on TEC and YOUNGO’s session at G-STIC 2022 Dubai on youth-led initiatives, this session will identify innovative solutions and emerging and transformational adaptation technologies. It will cover the role of communities, finance and the private sector in supporting the deployment of these transformational technologies to build better resilience and enhance adaptation to climate change.

This session is hosted by UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee, YOUNGO, and the Women and Gender Constituency.

Climate

Special session by TEC/YOUNGO: Unlocking the potential of adaptation technologies for building climate resilience

Share this session

14 February 2023, 16:30 - 17:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 21:30 - 22:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 14:30 - 15:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 04:30 - 05:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 03:30 - 04:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 01:00 - 02:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 23:30 - 00:45 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 2 & online

In the past few years, the majority of new climate technology and innovations have been aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation). However, we are experiencing more and more climate change impacts, evidenced by melting glaciers, droughts, heatwaves, floods, and other extreme weather events. This clearly indicates the pressing need to adapt and build resilience.

Technologies and innovation could help, in particular those that offer a transformative – instead of an incremental – approach to adaptation. These could include, for example, ways of creating of integrated natural coastal buffers or a sophisticated early warning system that would allow a coordinated response and quicker mobilization during a disaster. A transformative approach would require innovative thinking beyond the status-quo, engagement of key stakeholders along the process chain, and investments in capacity and other resources.

Building on TEC and YOUNGO’s session at G-STIC 2022 Dubai on youth-led initiatives, this session will identify innovative solutions and emerging and transformational adaptation technologies. It will cover the role of communities, finance and the private sector in supporting the deployment of these transformational technologies to build better resilience and enhance adaptation to climate change.

This session is hosted by UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee, YOUNGO, and the Women and Gender Constituency.

15 February 2023

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Climate

×

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

Climate

Deep dive session: A collaborative approach to deriving Colombia’s climate ambitions and NDC

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Auditorium 1 & online

Nationally Determined Contributions and derivative exercises to determine baselines and scenario definitions can be very useful tools for effective policy making. NDCs are derived by following a logical framework and governance process that acts to define a climate ambition and to develop an aggregated climate plan. It is a key example of how a country can deal with its commitment under the Paris Agreement.

This session will highlight the process and how the Colombian Government, the World Bank and international and national experts worked together to clarify Colombia’s climate ambitions. In Colombia’s case, the multi-disciplinary participatory process resulted in a lot of communication between different government departments and helped to connect several ambitions. Science-based data was also used to inform the final policy decisions.

This session will explore how Colombia derived its NDC, look at the lessons learned and how these could be applied to other countries that have yet to begin the process.

John Henry Melo

John Henry Melo

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Technical Coordinator of the NDC Implementation

Carolina Garzon

Carolina Garzon

Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development Colombia

Juan David Correa

Juan David Correa

VITO

Researcher Energy and Climate Strategy

Monica Espinosa

Monica Espinosa

UniAndes

Sector expert and Climate Policy expert

Chris Malley

Chris Malley

SEI

Senior researcher on atmospheric chemistry

10:30
14:30
14:30
15:30
08:30
22:30
21:30
19:00
17:30
Deep dive session

Climate

Meet world-renowned keynote speakers during the G-STIC Conference February 2023

Get inspired by real-life examples of technological solutions for the SDGs

Rose  Mwebaza
Meet
Rose Mwebaza
Rose Mwebaza
CTCN
Director
×
Rose  Mwebaza
Rose Mwebaza
CTCN
Director

Cross-thematic Climate

Meet Rose Mwebaza during this session

14 February, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience
Manuel Heitor
Meet
H.E. Manuel Heitor
H.E. Manuel Heitor
Portugal
former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education
×
Manuel Heitor
H.E. Manuel Heitor
Portugal
former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Cross-thematic Climate

Meet H.E. Manuel Heitor during this session

14 February, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience
Rose  Mwebaza
Rose Mwebaza
CTCN
Director
Manuel Heitor
H.E. Manuel Heitor
Portugal
former Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education

Have a discussion with top experts during the G-STIC Conference February 2023

Get new insights about technological solutions for the SDGs

Carlos Alexander
Meet
Carlos Alexander (TBC)
Carlos Alexander (TBC)
EXTRAQT
×
Carlos Alexander
Carlos Alexander (TBC)
EXTRAQT

Climate

Meet Carlos Alexander during this session

14 February, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects
Walter Buydens
Meet
Walter Buydens (TBC)
Walter Buydens (TBC)
Turbulent
CEO
×
Walter Buydens
Walter Buydens (TBC)
Turbulent
CEO

Climate

Meet Walter Buydens during this session

14 February, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects
Stijn De Jonge
Meet
Stijn De Jonge (TBC)
Stijn De Jonge (TBC)
EXTRAQT
Co-Founder
×
Stijn De Jonge
Stijn De Jonge (TBC)
EXTRAQT
Co-Founder

Climate

Meet Stijn De Jonge during this session

14 February, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Special session: G-STIC Climate Action Programme – Be inspired by climate finance projects
Leen  Govaerts
Meet
Leen Govaerts
Leen Govaerts
VITO
Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment
×
Leen  Govaerts
Leen Govaerts
VITO
Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment

Climate

Meet Leen Govaerts during this session

14 February, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience
Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real
Meet
Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real
Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real
UNFCCC TEC
Chair
×
Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real
Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real
UNFCCC TEC
Chair

Climate

Meet Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real during this session

14 February, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

14 February, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

14 February, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

14 February, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

14 February, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

14 February, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Plenary session: Climate finance to accelerate implementation of technological solutions for building climate resilience
Carlos Alexander
Carlos Alexander (TBC)
EXTRAQT
Walter Buydens
Walter Buydens (TBC)
Turbulent
CEO
Stijn De Jonge
Stijn De Jonge (TBC)
EXTRAQT
Co-Founder
Leen  Govaerts
Leen Govaerts
VITO
Unit Manager Smart Energy & Built Environment
Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real
Ambrosio Yobanolo del Real
UNFCCC TEC
Chair