OCEANS AS AN OPPORTUNITY

Unlocking the full potential of the blue economy

Oceans play a central role in tackling climate change by absorbing 30% of carbon dioxide emissions and 90% of the excess heat trapped by greenhouse gases. The oceans contain many times the amount of carbon in the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere, and will be the predominant, largest long-term sink for anthropogenic CO2. But could they play an even bigger role in CO2 reduction?

Land-based carbon sequestration schemes are already proving their value – given the fact that oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts. The risks and rewards of widescale deployment of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs) are not yet fully understood and there are obvious gaps in our knowledge of the full role of this type of technology.

Nevertheless, the future blue economy will depend on finding innovative and sustainable solutions that will help preserve the oceans’ ecosystems, and drive clean economic growth in the coming years.

Conference programme

Oceans

Sessions labeled will take place in EXPO MAG, the Convention Center in Rio de Janeiro. Sessions labeled will be live-streamed from Rio de Janeiro and can be followed online.

Show session times in local time zone

14 February 2023

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Oceans

×

Oceans

Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:30 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:30 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

Onshore carbon accounting schemes have been effective at encouraging different industries worldwide to use carbon reduction techniques. However, there is currently no marine carbon credit system in place. A blue carbon credit system will have to be based on a solid carbon accounting model but the reality is that there are still significant knowledge gaps in marine carbon accounting. This is related to the controversial character of developing ocean negative emissions technologies (NETs). As a consequence, CO2 reduction is not yet a major driver for the development of a sustainable blue economy. Applying the onshore GHG protocol for ‘anthropogenic’ carbon accounting in a marine context, and taking into account the best available knowledge on marine carbon accounting, may be the way forward. This deep dive explores the need to develop such a carbon accounting system and what it could look like.

Angela Williamson

Angela Williamson

Blue Economy CRC

Director Blue Policy and Planning

Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

VLIZ

Research Director

Jim Smart

Jim Smart (TBC)

Griffith University

Associate Professor at School of Environment and Science

Marni Oaten

Marni Oaten

Deloitte

Partner Climate & Sustainability

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:30 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:30 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

Onshore carbon accounting schemes have been effective at encouraging different industries worldwide to use carbon reduction techniques. However, there is currently no marine carbon credit system in place. A blue carbon credit system will have to be based on a solid carbon accounting model but the reality is that there are still significant knowledge gaps in marine carbon accounting. This is related to the controversial character of developing ocean negative emissions technologies (NETs). As a consequence, CO2 reduction is not yet a major driver for the development of a sustainable blue economy. Applying the onshore GHG protocol for ‘anthropogenic’ carbon accounting in a marine context, and taking into account the best available knowledge on marine carbon accounting, may be the way forward. This deep dive explores the need to develop such a carbon accounting system and what it could look like.

Angela Williamson

Angela Williamson

Blue Economy CRC

Director Blue Policy and Planning

Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

VLIZ

Research Director

Jim Smart

Jim Smart (TBC)

Griffith University

Associate Professor at School of Environment and Science

Marni Oaten

Marni Oaten

Deloitte

Partner Climate & Sustainability

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:30 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:30 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

Onshore carbon accounting schemes have been effective at encouraging different industries worldwide to use carbon reduction techniques. However, there is currently no marine carbon credit system in place. A blue carbon credit system will have to be based on a solid carbon accounting model but the reality is that there are still significant knowledge gaps in marine carbon accounting. This is related to the controversial character of developing ocean negative emissions technologies (NETs). As a consequence, CO2 reduction is not yet a major driver for the development of a sustainable blue economy. Applying the onshore GHG protocol for ‘anthropogenic’ carbon accounting in a marine context, and taking into account the best available knowledge on marine carbon accounting, may be the way forward. This deep dive explores the need to develop such a carbon accounting system and what it could look like.

Angela Williamson

Angela Williamson

Blue Economy CRC

Director Blue Policy and Planning

Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

VLIZ

Research Director

Jim Smart

Jim Smart (TBC)

Griffith University

Associate Professor at School of Environment and Science

Marni Oaten

Marni Oaten

Deloitte

Partner Climate & Sustainability

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:30 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:30 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

Onshore carbon accounting schemes have been effective at encouraging different industries worldwide to use carbon reduction techniques. However, there is currently no marine carbon credit system in place. A blue carbon credit system will have to be based on a solid carbon accounting model but the reality is that there are still significant knowledge gaps in marine carbon accounting. This is related to the controversial character of developing ocean negative emissions technologies (NETs). As a consequence, CO2 reduction is not yet a major driver for the development of a sustainable blue economy. Applying the onshore GHG protocol for ‘anthropogenic’ carbon accounting in a marine context, and taking into account the best available knowledge on marine carbon accounting, may be the way forward. This deep dive explores the need to develop such a carbon accounting system and what it could look like.

Angela Williamson

Angela Williamson

Blue Economy CRC

Director Blue Policy and Planning

Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

VLIZ

Research Director

Jim Smart

Jim Smart (TBC)

Griffith University

Associate Professor at School of Environment and Science

Marni Oaten

Marni Oaten

Deloitte

Partner Climate & Sustainability

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:30 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:30 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

Onshore carbon accounting schemes have been effective at encouraging different industries worldwide to use carbon reduction techniques. However, there is currently no marine carbon credit system in place. A blue carbon credit system will have to be based on a solid carbon accounting model but the reality is that there are still significant knowledge gaps in marine carbon accounting. This is related to the controversial character of developing ocean negative emissions technologies (NETs). As a consequence, CO2 reduction is not yet a major driver for the development of a sustainable blue economy. Applying the onshore GHG protocol for ‘anthropogenic’ carbon accounting in a marine context, and taking into account the best available knowledge on marine carbon accounting, may be the way forward. This deep dive explores the need to develop such a carbon accounting system and what it could look like.

Angela Williamson

Angela Williamson

Blue Economy CRC

Director Blue Policy and Planning

Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

VLIZ

Research Director

Jim Smart

Jim Smart (TBC)

Griffith University

Associate Professor at School of Environment and Science

Marni Oaten

Marni Oaten

Deloitte

Partner Climate & Sustainability

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:30 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:30 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

Onshore carbon accounting schemes have been effective at encouraging different industries worldwide to use carbon reduction techniques. However, there is currently no marine carbon credit system in place. A blue carbon credit system will have to be based on a solid carbon accounting model but the reality is that there are still significant knowledge gaps in marine carbon accounting. This is related to the controversial character of developing ocean negative emissions technologies (NETs). As a consequence, CO2 reduction is not yet a major driver for the development of a sustainable blue economy. Applying the onshore GHG protocol for ‘anthropogenic’ carbon accounting in a marine context, and taking into account the best available knowledge on marine carbon accounting, may be the way forward. This deep dive explores the need to develop such a carbon accounting system and what it could look like.

Angela Williamson

Angela Williamson

Blue Economy CRC

Director Blue Policy and Planning

Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

VLIZ

Research Director

Jim Smart

Jim Smart (TBC)

Griffith University

Associate Professor at School of Environment and Science

Marni Oaten

Marni Oaten

Deloitte

Partner Climate & Sustainability

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:30 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:30 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

Onshore carbon accounting schemes have been effective at encouraging different industries worldwide to use carbon reduction techniques. However, there is currently no marine carbon credit system in place. A blue carbon credit system will have to be based on a solid carbon accounting model but the reality is that there are still significant knowledge gaps in marine carbon accounting. This is related to the controversial character of developing ocean negative emissions technologies (NETs). As a consequence, CO2 reduction is not yet a major driver for the development of a sustainable blue economy. Applying the onshore GHG protocol for ‘anthropogenic’ carbon accounting in a marine context, and taking into account the best available knowledge on marine carbon accounting, may be the way forward. This deep dive explores the need to develop such a carbon accounting system and what it could look like.

Angela Williamson

Angela Williamson

Blue Economy CRC

Director Blue Policy and Planning

Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

VLIZ

Research Director

Jim Smart

Jim Smart (TBC)

Griffith University

Associate Professor at School of Environment and Science

Marni Oaten

Marni Oaten

Deloitte

Partner Climate & Sustainability

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:30 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:30 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

Onshore carbon accounting schemes have been effective at encouraging different industries worldwide to use carbon reduction techniques. However, there is currently no marine carbon credit system in place. A blue carbon credit system will have to be based on a solid carbon accounting model but the reality is that there are still significant knowledge gaps in marine carbon accounting. This is related to the controversial character of developing ocean negative emissions technologies (NETs). As a consequence, CO2 reduction is not yet a major driver for the development of a sustainable blue economy. Applying the onshore GHG protocol for ‘anthropogenic’ carbon accounting in a marine context, and taking into account the best available knowledge on marine carbon accounting, may be the way forward. This deep dive explores the need to develop such a carbon accounting system and what it could look like.

Angela Williamson

Angela Williamson

Blue Economy CRC

Director Blue Policy and Planning

Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

VLIZ

Research Director

Jim Smart

Jim Smart (TBC)

Griffith University

Associate Professor at School of Environment and Science

Marni Oaten

Marni Oaten

Deloitte

Partner Climate & Sustainability

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: Carbon accounting in oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:30 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:30 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:30 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:30 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:30 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:30 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:30 GST (Dubai)

Onshore carbon accounting schemes have been effective at encouraging different industries worldwide to use carbon reduction techniques. However, there is currently no marine carbon credit system in place. A blue carbon credit system will have to be based on a solid carbon accounting model but the reality is that there are still significant knowledge gaps in marine carbon accounting. This is related to the controversial character of developing ocean negative emissions technologies (NETs). As a consequence, CO2 reduction is not yet a major driver for the development of a sustainable blue economy. Applying the onshore GHG protocol for ‘anthropogenic’ carbon accounting in a marine context, and taking into account the best available knowledge on marine carbon accounting, may be the way forward. This deep dive explores the need to develop such a carbon accounting system and what it could look like.

Angela Williamson

Angela Williamson

Blue Economy CRC

Director Blue Policy and Planning

Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

VLIZ

Research Director

Jim Smart

Jim Smart (TBC)

Griffith University

Associate Professor at School of Environment and Science

Marni Oaten

Marni Oaten

Deloitte

Partner Climate & Sustainability

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

13:30
17:30
17:30
18:30
11:30
01:30
00:30
22:00
20:30
Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Oceans

×

Oceans

Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Room Manguinhos & online

The Earth is dominated by water: about 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water and the oceans alone hold about 96.5% of the Earth’s total water. Water also exits in the air as water vapor, in the ice caps and glaciers, in rivers and lakes, in soil and in underground aquifers. The water cycle, or the continuous movement of water between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, distributes water and regulates global weather patterns and is therefore fundamental to life on the planet. Furthermore, the oceans produce about half of the oxygen in our atmosphere, acts as a sink and reservoir for greenhouse gases, support all biodiversity, and are responsible for the existence of a large variety of ecosystems that are critical to our wellbeing and the health of the planet.

Despite their life-giving role, the health of the oceans is deteriorating at an alarming rate as a result of human activities and climate change. Eutrophication, acidification, warming, deoxygenation, deforestation, overfishing, and pollution are some of the threats to the health of our oceans, which in turn adversely affects, directly or indirectly, biodiversity, the proper functioning of ecosystems and the welfare of billions of people.

The plenary session will feature discussions related to the current state of the oceans, the resilience coastal communities, and the blue economy.

Ocean and climate change

Regina  Folorunsho

Regina Folorunsho

Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research

Director Marine Meteorology and Climate Department

The future of the ocean economy

Claire Jolly

Claire Jolly

OECD

Head of Unit in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Ocean observations

Letícia  Cotrim

Letícia Cotrim

UERJ

Assistant Professor

Tackling socioenvironmental vulnerability in bays and estuaries in Brazil

Luiz Paulo Assad

Luiz Paulo Assad

Federal University Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Professor

The health of corals in Brazil

Milton Kampel

Milton Kampel

MOceanS, INPE

Director

Moderated by

Jose Luiz Moutinho

Jose Luiz Moutinho

AIR Centre

Chief Business & Networking Officer

Oceans

Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Room Manguinhos & online

The Earth is dominated by water: about 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water and the oceans alone hold about 96.5% of the Earth’s total water. Water also exits in the air as water vapor, in the ice caps and glaciers, in rivers and lakes, in soil and in underground aquifers. The water cycle, or the continuous movement of water between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, distributes water and regulates global weather patterns and is therefore fundamental to life on the planet. Furthermore, the oceans produce about half of the oxygen in our atmosphere, acts as a sink and reservoir for greenhouse gases, support all biodiversity, and are responsible for the existence of a large variety of ecosystems that are critical to our wellbeing and the health of the planet.

Despite their life-giving role, the health of the oceans is deteriorating at an alarming rate as a result of human activities and climate change. Eutrophication, acidification, warming, deoxygenation, deforestation, overfishing, and pollution are some of the threats to the health of our oceans, which in turn adversely affects, directly or indirectly, biodiversity, the proper functioning of ecosystems and the welfare of billions of people.

The plenary session will feature discussions related to the current state of the oceans, the resilience coastal communities, and the blue economy.

Ocean and climate change

Regina  Folorunsho

Regina Folorunsho

Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research

Director Marine Meteorology and Climate Department

The future of the ocean economy

Claire Jolly

Claire Jolly

OECD

Head of Unit in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Ocean observations

Letícia  Cotrim

Letícia Cotrim

UERJ

Assistant Professor

Tackling socioenvironmental vulnerability in bays and estuaries in Brazil

Luiz Paulo Assad

Luiz Paulo Assad

Federal University Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Professor

The health of corals in Brazil

Milton Kampel

Milton Kampel

MOceanS, INPE

Director

Moderated by

Jose Luiz Moutinho

Jose Luiz Moutinho

AIR Centre

Chief Business & Networking Officer

Oceans

Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Room Manguinhos & online

The Earth is dominated by water: about 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water and the oceans alone hold about 96.5% of the Earth’s total water. Water also exits in the air as water vapor, in the ice caps and glaciers, in rivers and lakes, in soil and in underground aquifers. The water cycle, or the continuous movement of water between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, distributes water and regulates global weather patterns and is therefore fundamental to life on the planet. Furthermore, the oceans produce about half of the oxygen in our atmosphere, acts as a sink and reservoir for greenhouse gases, support all biodiversity, and are responsible for the existence of a large variety of ecosystems that are critical to our wellbeing and the health of the planet.

Despite their life-giving role, the health of the oceans is deteriorating at an alarming rate as a result of human activities and climate change. Eutrophication, acidification, warming, deoxygenation, deforestation, overfishing, and pollution are some of the threats to the health of our oceans, which in turn adversely affects, directly or indirectly, biodiversity, the proper functioning of ecosystems and the welfare of billions of people.

The plenary session will feature discussions related to the current state of the oceans, the resilience coastal communities, and the blue economy.

Ocean and climate change

Regina  Folorunsho

Regina Folorunsho

Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research

Director Marine Meteorology and Climate Department

The future of the ocean economy

Claire Jolly

Claire Jolly

OECD

Head of Unit in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Ocean observations

Letícia  Cotrim

Letícia Cotrim

UERJ

Assistant Professor

Tackling socioenvironmental vulnerability in bays and estuaries in Brazil

Luiz Paulo Assad

Luiz Paulo Assad

Federal University Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Professor

The health of corals in Brazil

Milton Kampel

Milton Kampel

MOceanS, INPE

Director

Moderated by

Jose Luiz Moutinho

Jose Luiz Moutinho

AIR Centre

Chief Business & Networking Officer

Oceans

Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Room Manguinhos & online

The Earth is dominated by water: about 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water and the oceans alone hold about 96.5% of the Earth’s total water. Water also exits in the air as water vapor, in the ice caps and glaciers, in rivers and lakes, in soil and in underground aquifers. The water cycle, or the continuous movement of water between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, distributes water and regulates global weather patterns and is therefore fundamental to life on the planet. Furthermore, the oceans produce about half of the oxygen in our atmosphere, acts as a sink and reservoir for greenhouse gases, support all biodiversity, and are responsible for the existence of a large variety of ecosystems that are critical to our wellbeing and the health of the planet.

Despite their life-giving role, the health of the oceans is deteriorating at an alarming rate as a result of human activities and climate change. Eutrophication, acidification, warming, deoxygenation, deforestation, overfishing, and pollution are some of the threats to the health of our oceans, which in turn adversely affects, directly or indirectly, biodiversity, the proper functioning of ecosystems and the welfare of billions of people.

The plenary session will feature discussions related to the current state of the oceans, the resilience coastal communities, and the blue economy.

Ocean and climate change

Regina  Folorunsho

Regina Folorunsho

Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research

Director Marine Meteorology and Climate Department

The future of the ocean economy

Claire Jolly

Claire Jolly

OECD

Head of Unit in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Ocean observations

Letícia  Cotrim

Letícia Cotrim

UERJ

Assistant Professor

Tackling socioenvironmental vulnerability in bays and estuaries in Brazil

Luiz Paulo Assad

Luiz Paulo Assad

Federal University Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Professor

The health of corals in Brazil

Milton Kampel

Milton Kampel

MOceanS, INPE

Director

Moderated by

Jose Luiz Moutinho

Jose Luiz Moutinho

AIR Centre

Chief Business & Networking Officer

Oceans

Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Room Manguinhos & online

The Earth is dominated by water: about 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water and the oceans alone hold about 96.5% of the Earth’s total water. Water also exits in the air as water vapor, in the ice caps and glaciers, in rivers and lakes, in soil and in underground aquifers. The water cycle, or the continuous movement of water between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, distributes water and regulates global weather patterns and is therefore fundamental to life on the planet. Furthermore, the oceans produce about half of the oxygen in our atmosphere, acts as a sink and reservoir for greenhouse gases, support all biodiversity, and are responsible for the existence of a large variety of ecosystems that are critical to our wellbeing and the health of the planet.

Despite their life-giving role, the health of the oceans is deteriorating at an alarming rate as a result of human activities and climate change. Eutrophication, acidification, warming, deoxygenation, deforestation, overfishing, and pollution are some of the threats to the health of our oceans, which in turn adversely affects, directly or indirectly, biodiversity, the proper functioning of ecosystems and the welfare of billions of people.

The plenary session will feature discussions related to the current state of the oceans, the resilience coastal communities, and the blue economy.

Ocean and climate change

Regina  Folorunsho

Regina Folorunsho

Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research

Director Marine Meteorology and Climate Department

The future of the ocean economy

Claire Jolly

Claire Jolly

OECD

Head of Unit in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Ocean observations

Letícia  Cotrim

Letícia Cotrim

UERJ

Assistant Professor

Tackling socioenvironmental vulnerability in bays and estuaries in Brazil

Luiz Paulo Assad

Luiz Paulo Assad

Federal University Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Professor

The health of corals in Brazil

Milton Kampel

Milton Kampel

MOceanS, INPE

Director

Moderated by

Jose Luiz Moutinho

Jose Luiz Moutinho

AIR Centre

Chief Business & Networking Officer

Oceans

Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Room Manguinhos & online

The Earth is dominated by water: about 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water and the oceans alone hold about 96.5% of the Earth’s total water. Water also exits in the air as water vapor, in the ice caps and glaciers, in rivers and lakes, in soil and in underground aquifers. The water cycle, or the continuous movement of water between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, distributes water and regulates global weather patterns and is therefore fundamental to life on the planet. Furthermore, the oceans produce about half of the oxygen in our atmosphere, acts as a sink and reservoir for greenhouse gases, support all biodiversity, and are responsible for the existence of a large variety of ecosystems that are critical to our wellbeing and the health of the planet.

Despite their life-giving role, the health of the oceans is deteriorating at an alarming rate as a result of human activities and climate change. Eutrophication, acidification, warming, deoxygenation, deforestation, overfishing, and pollution are some of the threats to the health of our oceans, which in turn adversely affects, directly or indirectly, biodiversity, the proper functioning of ecosystems and the welfare of billions of people.

The plenary session will feature discussions related to the current state of the oceans, the resilience coastal communities, and the blue economy.

Ocean and climate change

Regina  Folorunsho

Regina Folorunsho

Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research

Director Marine Meteorology and Climate Department

The future of the ocean economy

Claire Jolly

Claire Jolly

OECD

Head of Unit in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Ocean observations

Letícia  Cotrim

Letícia Cotrim

UERJ

Assistant Professor

Tackling socioenvironmental vulnerability in bays and estuaries in Brazil

Luiz Paulo Assad

Luiz Paulo Assad

Federal University Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Professor

The health of corals in Brazil

Milton Kampel

Milton Kampel

MOceanS, INPE

Director

Moderated by

Jose Luiz Moutinho

Jose Luiz Moutinho

AIR Centre

Chief Business & Networking Officer

Oceans

Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Room Manguinhos & online

The Earth is dominated by water: about 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water and the oceans alone hold about 96.5% of the Earth’s total water. Water also exits in the air as water vapor, in the ice caps and glaciers, in rivers and lakes, in soil and in underground aquifers. The water cycle, or the continuous movement of water between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, distributes water and regulates global weather patterns and is therefore fundamental to life on the planet. Furthermore, the oceans produce about half of the oxygen in our atmosphere, acts as a sink and reservoir for greenhouse gases, support all biodiversity, and are responsible for the existence of a large variety of ecosystems that are critical to our wellbeing and the health of the planet.

Despite their life-giving role, the health of the oceans is deteriorating at an alarming rate as a result of human activities and climate change. Eutrophication, acidification, warming, deoxygenation, deforestation, overfishing, and pollution are some of the threats to the health of our oceans, which in turn adversely affects, directly or indirectly, biodiversity, the proper functioning of ecosystems and the welfare of billions of people.

The plenary session will feature discussions related to the current state of the oceans, the resilience coastal communities, and the blue economy.

Ocean and climate change

Regina  Folorunsho

Regina Folorunsho

Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research

Director Marine Meteorology and Climate Department

The future of the ocean economy

Claire Jolly

Claire Jolly

OECD

Head of Unit in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Ocean observations

Letícia  Cotrim

Letícia Cotrim

UERJ

Assistant Professor

Tackling socioenvironmental vulnerability in bays and estuaries in Brazil

Luiz Paulo Assad

Luiz Paulo Assad

Federal University Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Professor

The health of corals in Brazil

Milton Kampel

Milton Kampel

MOceanS, INPE

Director

Moderated by

Jose Luiz Moutinho

Jose Luiz Moutinho

AIR Centre

Chief Business & Networking Officer

Oceans

Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Room Manguinhos & online

The Earth is dominated by water: about 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water and the oceans alone hold about 96.5% of the Earth’s total water. Water also exits in the air as water vapor, in the ice caps and glaciers, in rivers and lakes, in soil and in underground aquifers. The water cycle, or the continuous movement of water between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, distributes water and regulates global weather patterns and is therefore fundamental to life on the planet. Furthermore, the oceans produce about half of the oxygen in our atmosphere, acts as a sink and reservoir for greenhouse gases, support all biodiversity, and are responsible for the existence of a large variety of ecosystems that are critical to our wellbeing and the health of the planet.

Despite their life-giving role, the health of the oceans is deteriorating at an alarming rate as a result of human activities and climate change. Eutrophication, acidification, warming, deoxygenation, deforestation, overfishing, and pollution are some of the threats to the health of our oceans, which in turn adversely affects, directly or indirectly, biodiversity, the proper functioning of ecosystems and the welfare of billions of people.

The plenary session will feature discussions related to the current state of the oceans, the resilience coastal communities, and the blue economy.

Ocean and climate change

Regina  Folorunsho

Regina Folorunsho

Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research

Director Marine Meteorology and Climate Department

The future of the ocean economy

Claire Jolly

Claire Jolly

OECD

Head of Unit in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Ocean observations

Letícia  Cotrim

Letícia Cotrim

UERJ

Assistant Professor

Tackling socioenvironmental vulnerability in bays and estuaries in Brazil

Luiz Paulo Assad

Luiz Paulo Assad

Federal University Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Professor

The health of corals in Brazil

Milton Kampel

Milton Kampel

MOceanS, INPE

Director

Moderated by

Jose Luiz Moutinho

Jose Luiz Moutinho

AIR Centre

Chief Business & Networking Officer

Oceans

Plenary session: The future of our oceans

Share this session

14 February 2023, 13:30 - 14:45 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 CET (Brussels)

14 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 WAT (Nigeria)

14 February 2023, 18:30 - 19:45 SAST (Cape Town)

14 February 2023, 11:30 - 12:45 EST (New York)

14 February 2023, 01:30 - 02:45 KST (Seoul)

14 February 2023, 00:30 - 01:45 CST (Beijing)

14 February 2023, 22:00 - 23:15 IST (New Delhi)

14 February 2023, 20:30 - 21:45 GST (Dubai)

Room Manguinhos & online

The Earth is dominated by water: about 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water and the oceans alone hold about 96.5% of the Earth’s total water. Water also exits in the air as water vapor, in the ice caps and glaciers, in rivers and lakes, in soil and in underground aquifers. The water cycle, or the continuous movement of water between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, distributes water and regulates global weather patterns and is therefore fundamental to life on the planet. Furthermore, the oceans produce about half of the oxygen in our atmosphere, acts as a sink and reservoir for greenhouse gases, support all biodiversity, and are responsible for the existence of a large variety of ecosystems that are critical to our wellbeing and the health of the planet.

Despite their life-giving role, the health of the oceans is deteriorating at an alarming rate as a result of human activities and climate change. Eutrophication, acidification, warming, deoxygenation, deforestation, overfishing, and pollution are some of the threats to the health of our oceans, which in turn adversely affects, directly or indirectly, biodiversity, the proper functioning of ecosystems and the welfare of billions of people.

The plenary session will feature discussions related to the current state of the oceans, the resilience coastal communities, and the blue economy.

Ocean and climate change

Regina  Folorunsho

Regina Folorunsho

Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research

Director Marine Meteorology and Climate Department

The future of the ocean economy

Claire Jolly

Claire Jolly

OECD

Head of Unit in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

Ocean observations

Letícia  Cotrim

Letícia Cotrim

UERJ

Assistant Professor

Tackling socioenvironmental vulnerability in bays and estuaries in Brazil

Luiz Paulo Assad

Luiz Paulo Assad

Federal University Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Professor

The health of corals in Brazil

Milton Kampel

Milton Kampel

MOceanS, INPE

Director

Moderated by

Jose Luiz Moutinho

Jose Luiz Moutinho

AIR Centre

Chief Business & Networking Officer

15 February 2023

09:00
13:00
13:00
14:00
07:00
21:00
20:00
17:30
16:00
Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Oceans

×

Oceans

Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Room Lapa & online

The health of the oceans, and the wellbeing and resilience of coastal communities, needs urgent action to tackle the combined effects of human stressors and climate change. Preserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is not only about conserving nature and mitigating human impacts, it is also vital for our survival.

Earth has already undergone several periods of change but life always found ways to recover and thrive once more.  We are now faced with a new and potentially devastating challenge, the collapse of our oceans. We are still in time to prevent this and avoid another mass extinction, which given the central importance of the oceans to our existence, would probably include humanity. It is time to respond to this challenge by harnessing the power of our collective imaginations and building on our innate ability to collaborate so we can fully restore the health of the oceans, and the ecosystems and biodiversity they support, within the next decade.

This deep dive session will discuss innovative solutions for the preservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity.

Adaptation and mitigation of the impacts of climate change in coastal communities

Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins

AESEDA

Co-Director

Achieving food and nutritional security with integrated multi-trophic aquaculture

Elisa Ravagnan

Elisa Ravagnan

NORCE Norwegian Research Centre

Senior Scientist

Increased environmental and social resilience through ecosystem services-based mangrove restoration

Yara  Schaeffer Novelli

Yara Schaeffer Novelli

University of São Paulo

Marine forests and their role in the oceans

Sergio  Rossi

Sergio Rossi

DISTEBA

Associate Professor

Moderated by

Alex  Turra

Alex Turra

UNESCO Chair on Ocean Sustainability

Coordinator

Oceans

Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Room Lapa & online

The health of the oceans, and the wellbeing and resilience of coastal communities, needs urgent action to tackle the combined effects of human stressors and climate change. Preserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is not only about conserving nature and mitigating human impacts, it is also vital for our survival.

Earth has already undergone several periods of change but life always found ways to recover and thrive once more.  We are now faced with a new and potentially devastating challenge, the collapse of our oceans. We are still in time to prevent this and avoid another mass extinction, which given the central importance of the oceans to our existence, would probably include humanity. It is time to respond to this challenge by harnessing the power of our collective imaginations and building on our innate ability to collaborate so we can fully restore the health of the oceans, and the ecosystems and biodiversity they support, within the next decade.

This deep dive session will discuss innovative solutions for the preservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity.

Adaptation and mitigation of the impacts of climate change in coastal communities

Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins

AESEDA

Co-Director

Achieving food and nutritional security with integrated multi-trophic aquaculture

Elisa Ravagnan

Elisa Ravagnan

NORCE Norwegian Research Centre

Senior Scientist

Increased environmental and social resilience through ecosystem services-based mangrove restoration

Yara  Schaeffer Novelli

Yara Schaeffer Novelli

University of São Paulo

Marine forests and their role in the oceans

Sergio  Rossi

Sergio Rossi

DISTEBA

Associate Professor

Moderated by

Alex  Turra

Alex Turra

UNESCO Chair on Ocean Sustainability

Coordinator

Oceans

Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Room Lapa & online

The health of the oceans, and the wellbeing and resilience of coastal communities, needs urgent action to tackle the combined effects of human stressors and climate change. Preserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is not only about conserving nature and mitigating human impacts, it is also vital for our survival.

Earth has already undergone several periods of change but life always found ways to recover and thrive once more.  We are now faced with a new and potentially devastating challenge, the collapse of our oceans. We are still in time to prevent this and avoid another mass extinction, which given the central importance of the oceans to our existence, would probably include humanity. It is time to respond to this challenge by harnessing the power of our collective imaginations and building on our innate ability to collaborate so we can fully restore the health of the oceans, and the ecosystems and biodiversity they support, within the next decade.

This deep dive session will discuss innovative solutions for the preservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity.

Adaptation and mitigation of the impacts of climate change in coastal communities

Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins

AESEDA

Co-Director

Achieving food and nutritional security with integrated multi-trophic aquaculture

Elisa Ravagnan

Elisa Ravagnan

NORCE Norwegian Research Centre

Senior Scientist

Increased environmental and social resilience through ecosystem services-based mangrove restoration

Yara  Schaeffer Novelli

Yara Schaeffer Novelli

University of São Paulo

Marine forests and their role in the oceans

Sergio  Rossi

Sergio Rossi

DISTEBA

Associate Professor

Moderated by

Alex  Turra

Alex Turra

UNESCO Chair on Ocean Sustainability

Coordinator

Oceans

Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Room Lapa & online

The health of the oceans, and the wellbeing and resilience of coastal communities, needs urgent action to tackle the combined effects of human stressors and climate change. Preserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is not only about conserving nature and mitigating human impacts, it is also vital for our survival.

Earth has already undergone several periods of change but life always found ways to recover and thrive once more.  We are now faced with a new and potentially devastating challenge, the collapse of our oceans. We are still in time to prevent this and avoid another mass extinction, which given the central importance of the oceans to our existence, would probably include humanity. It is time to respond to this challenge by harnessing the power of our collective imaginations and building on our innate ability to collaborate so we can fully restore the health of the oceans, and the ecosystems and biodiversity they support, within the next decade.

This deep dive session will discuss innovative solutions for the preservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity.

Adaptation and mitigation of the impacts of climate change in coastal communities

Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins

AESEDA

Co-Director

Achieving food and nutritional security with integrated multi-trophic aquaculture

Elisa Ravagnan

Elisa Ravagnan

NORCE Norwegian Research Centre

Senior Scientist

Increased environmental and social resilience through ecosystem services-based mangrove restoration

Yara  Schaeffer Novelli

Yara Schaeffer Novelli

University of São Paulo

Marine forests and their role in the oceans

Sergio  Rossi

Sergio Rossi

DISTEBA

Associate Professor

Moderated by

Alex  Turra

Alex Turra

UNESCO Chair on Ocean Sustainability

Coordinator

Oceans

Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Room Lapa & online

The health of the oceans, and the wellbeing and resilience of coastal communities, needs urgent action to tackle the combined effects of human stressors and climate change. Preserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is not only about conserving nature and mitigating human impacts, it is also vital for our survival.

Earth has already undergone several periods of change but life always found ways to recover and thrive once more.  We are now faced with a new and potentially devastating challenge, the collapse of our oceans. We are still in time to prevent this and avoid another mass extinction, which given the central importance of the oceans to our existence, would probably include humanity. It is time to respond to this challenge by harnessing the power of our collective imaginations and building on our innate ability to collaborate so we can fully restore the health of the oceans, and the ecosystems and biodiversity they support, within the next decade.

This deep dive session will discuss innovative solutions for the preservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity.

Adaptation and mitigation of the impacts of climate change in coastal communities

Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins

AESEDA

Co-Director

Achieving food and nutritional security with integrated multi-trophic aquaculture

Elisa Ravagnan

Elisa Ravagnan

NORCE Norwegian Research Centre

Senior Scientist

Increased environmental and social resilience through ecosystem services-based mangrove restoration

Yara  Schaeffer Novelli

Yara Schaeffer Novelli

University of São Paulo

Marine forests and their role in the oceans

Sergio  Rossi

Sergio Rossi

DISTEBA

Associate Professor

Moderated by

Alex  Turra

Alex Turra

UNESCO Chair on Ocean Sustainability

Coordinator

Oceans

Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Room Lapa & online

The health of the oceans, and the wellbeing and resilience of coastal communities, needs urgent action to tackle the combined effects of human stressors and climate change. Preserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is not only about conserving nature and mitigating human impacts, it is also vital for our survival.

Earth has already undergone several periods of change but life always found ways to recover and thrive once more.  We are now faced with a new and potentially devastating challenge, the collapse of our oceans. We are still in time to prevent this and avoid another mass extinction, which given the central importance of the oceans to our existence, would probably include humanity. It is time to respond to this challenge by harnessing the power of our collective imaginations and building on our innate ability to collaborate so we can fully restore the health of the oceans, and the ecosystems and biodiversity they support, within the next decade.

This deep dive session will discuss innovative solutions for the preservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity.

Adaptation and mitigation of the impacts of climate change in coastal communities

Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins

AESEDA

Co-Director

Achieving food and nutritional security with integrated multi-trophic aquaculture

Elisa Ravagnan

Elisa Ravagnan

NORCE Norwegian Research Centre

Senior Scientist

Increased environmental and social resilience through ecosystem services-based mangrove restoration

Yara  Schaeffer Novelli

Yara Schaeffer Novelli

University of São Paulo

Marine forests and their role in the oceans

Sergio  Rossi

Sergio Rossi

DISTEBA

Associate Professor

Moderated by

Alex  Turra

Alex Turra

UNESCO Chair on Ocean Sustainability

Coordinator

Oceans

Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Room Lapa & online

The health of the oceans, and the wellbeing and resilience of coastal communities, needs urgent action to tackle the combined effects of human stressors and climate change. Preserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is not only about conserving nature and mitigating human impacts, it is also vital for our survival.

Earth has already undergone several periods of change but life always found ways to recover and thrive once more.  We are now faced with a new and potentially devastating challenge, the collapse of our oceans. We are still in time to prevent this and avoid another mass extinction, which given the central importance of the oceans to our existence, would probably include humanity. It is time to respond to this challenge by harnessing the power of our collective imaginations and building on our innate ability to collaborate so we can fully restore the health of the oceans, and the ecosystems and biodiversity they support, within the next decade.

This deep dive session will discuss innovative solutions for the preservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity.

Adaptation and mitigation of the impacts of climate change in coastal communities

Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins

AESEDA

Co-Director

Achieving food and nutritional security with integrated multi-trophic aquaculture

Elisa Ravagnan

Elisa Ravagnan

NORCE Norwegian Research Centre

Senior Scientist

Increased environmental and social resilience through ecosystem services-based mangrove restoration

Yara  Schaeffer Novelli

Yara Schaeffer Novelli

University of São Paulo

Marine forests and their role in the oceans

Sergio  Rossi

Sergio Rossi

DISTEBA

Associate Professor

Moderated by

Alex  Turra

Alex Turra

UNESCO Chair on Ocean Sustainability

Coordinator

Oceans

Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Room Lapa & online

The health of the oceans, and the wellbeing and resilience of coastal communities, needs urgent action to tackle the combined effects of human stressors and climate change. Preserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is not only about conserving nature and mitigating human impacts, it is also vital for our survival.

Earth has already undergone several periods of change but life always found ways to recover and thrive once more.  We are now faced with a new and potentially devastating challenge, the collapse of our oceans. We are still in time to prevent this and avoid another mass extinction, which given the central importance of the oceans to our existence, would probably include humanity. It is time to respond to this challenge by harnessing the power of our collective imaginations and building on our innate ability to collaborate so we can fully restore the health of the oceans, and the ecosystems and biodiversity they support, within the next decade.

This deep dive session will discuss innovative solutions for the preservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity.

Adaptation and mitigation of the impacts of climate change in coastal communities

Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins

AESEDA

Co-Director

Achieving food and nutritional security with integrated multi-trophic aquaculture

Elisa Ravagnan

Elisa Ravagnan

NORCE Norwegian Research Centre

Senior Scientist

Increased environmental and social resilience through ecosystem services-based mangrove restoration

Yara  Schaeffer Novelli

Yara Schaeffer Novelli

University of São Paulo

Marine forests and their role in the oceans

Sergio  Rossi

Sergio Rossi

DISTEBA

Associate Professor

Moderated by

Alex  Turra

Alex Turra

UNESCO Chair on Ocean Sustainability

Coordinator

Oceans

Deep dive session: Solutions and local action

Share this session

15 February 2023, 09:00 - 10:15 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 13:00 - 14:15 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 14:00 - 15:15 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 07:00 - 08:15 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 21:00 - 22:15 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 20:00 - 21:15 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:45 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 16:00 - 17:15 GST (Dubai)

Room Lapa & online

The health of the oceans, and the wellbeing and resilience of coastal communities, needs urgent action to tackle the combined effects of human stressors and climate change. Preserving and restoring marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is not only about conserving nature and mitigating human impacts, it is also vital for our survival.

Earth has already undergone several periods of change but life always found ways to recover and thrive once more.  We are now faced with a new and potentially devastating challenge, the collapse of our oceans. We are still in time to prevent this and avoid another mass extinction, which given the central importance of the oceans to our existence, would probably include humanity. It is time to respond to this challenge by harnessing the power of our collective imaginations and building on our innate ability to collaborate so we can fully restore the health of the oceans, and the ecosystems and biodiversity they support, within the next decade.

This deep dive session will discuss innovative solutions for the preservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity.

Adaptation and mitigation of the impacts of climate change in coastal communities

Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins

AESEDA

Co-Director

Achieving food and nutritional security with integrated multi-trophic aquaculture

Elisa Ravagnan

Elisa Ravagnan

NORCE Norwegian Research Centre

Senior Scientist

Increased environmental and social resilience through ecosystem services-based mangrove restoration

Yara  Schaeffer Novelli

Yara Schaeffer Novelli

University of São Paulo

Marine forests and their role in the oceans

Sergio  Rossi

Sergio Rossi

DISTEBA

Associate Professor

Moderated by

Alex  Turra

Alex Turra

UNESCO Chair on Ocean Sustainability

Coordinator

10:30
14:30
14:30
15:30
08:30
22:30
21:30
19:00
17:30
Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Oceans

×

Oceans

Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Share this session

15 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Carbon sequestration will play a key role in limiting global warming to well below 2°C. Given the fact that oceans cover most of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts.

The speakers will discuss how to make use of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs). They will dive into the technical challenges as well as looking at how to balance the risks of accelerating the implementation of ocean NETs and which techniques are already offered by nature (“blue carbon”). This discussion covers policy schemes, societal acceptance of certain risks, and a science-based debate on what is technically feasible today. It focuses on the science-technology-policy nexus and gives special attention to the question of how to accelerate the delivery of effective solutions.

Ann  Van Reusel

Ann Van Reusel

Ghent University

Head of the research group Marine Biology

Filip Meysmans

Filip Meysmans

University of Antwerp

Professor

James Kairo

James Kairo (TBC)

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

Chief Scientist

Nico Koedam

Nico Koedam (TBC)

VUB

Professor at Faculty of Sciences and Bio-engineering Sciences

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Share this session

15 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Carbon sequestration will play a key role in limiting global warming to well below 2°C. Given the fact that oceans cover most of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts.

The speakers will discuss how to make use of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs). They will dive into the technical challenges as well as looking at how to balance the risks of accelerating the implementation of ocean NETs and which techniques are already offered by nature (“blue carbon”). This discussion covers policy schemes, societal acceptance of certain risks, and a science-based debate on what is technically feasible today. It focuses on the science-technology-policy nexus and gives special attention to the question of how to accelerate the delivery of effective solutions.

Ann  Van Reusel

Ann Van Reusel

Ghent University

Head of the research group Marine Biology

Filip Meysmans

Filip Meysmans

University of Antwerp

Professor

James Kairo

James Kairo (TBC)

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

Chief Scientist

Nico Koedam

Nico Koedam (TBC)

VUB

Professor at Faculty of Sciences and Bio-engineering Sciences

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Share this session

15 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Carbon sequestration will play a key role in limiting global warming to well below 2°C. Given the fact that oceans cover most of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts.

The speakers will discuss how to make use of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs). They will dive into the technical challenges as well as looking at how to balance the risks of accelerating the implementation of ocean NETs and which techniques are already offered by nature (“blue carbon”). This discussion covers policy schemes, societal acceptance of certain risks, and a science-based debate on what is technically feasible today. It focuses on the science-technology-policy nexus and gives special attention to the question of how to accelerate the delivery of effective solutions.

Ann  Van Reusel

Ann Van Reusel

Ghent University

Head of the research group Marine Biology

Filip Meysmans

Filip Meysmans

University of Antwerp

Professor

James Kairo

James Kairo (TBC)

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

Chief Scientist

Nico Koedam

Nico Koedam (TBC)

VUB

Professor at Faculty of Sciences and Bio-engineering Sciences

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Share this session

15 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Carbon sequestration will play a key role in limiting global warming to well below 2°C. Given the fact that oceans cover most of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts.

The speakers will discuss how to make use of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs). They will dive into the technical challenges as well as looking at how to balance the risks of accelerating the implementation of ocean NETs and which techniques are already offered by nature (“blue carbon”). This discussion covers policy schemes, societal acceptance of certain risks, and a science-based debate on what is technically feasible today. It focuses on the science-technology-policy nexus and gives special attention to the question of how to accelerate the delivery of effective solutions.

Ann  Van Reusel

Ann Van Reusel

Ghent University

Head of the research group Marine Biology

Filip Meysmans

Filip Meysmans

University of Antwerp

Professor

James Kairo

James Kairo (TBC)

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

Chief Scientist

Nico Koedam

Nico Koedam (TBC)

VUB

Professor at Faculty of Sciences and Bio-engineering Sciences

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Share this session

15 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Carbon sequestration will play a key role in limiting global warming to well below 2°C. Given the fact that oceans cover most of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts.

The speakers will discuss how to make use of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs). They will dive into the technical challenges as well as looking at how to balance the risks of accelerating the implementation of ocean NETs and which techniques are already offered by nature (“blue carbon”). This discussion covers policy schemes, societal acceptance of certain risks, and a science-based debate on what is technically feasible today. It focuses on the science-technology-policy nexus and gives special attention to the question of how to accelerate the delivery of effective solutions.

Ann  Van Reusel

Ann Van Reusel

Ghent University

Head of the research group Marine Biology

Filip Meysmans

Filip Meysmans

University of Antwerp

Professor

James Kairo

James Kairo (TBC)

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

Chief Scientist

Nico Koedam

Nico Koedam (TBC)

VUB

Professor at Faculty of Sciences and Bio-engineering Sciences

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Share this session

15 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Carbon sequestration will play a key role in limiting global warming to well below 2°C. Given the fact that oceans cover most of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts.

The speakers will discuss how to make use of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs). They will dive into the technical challenges as well as looking at how to balance the risks of accelerating the implementation of ocean NETs and which techniques are already offered by nature (“blue carbon”). This discussion covers policy schemes, societal acceptance of certain risks, and a science-based debate on what is technically feasible today. It focuses on the science-technology-policy nexus and gives special attention to the question of how to accelerate the delivery of effective solutions.

Ann  Van Reusel

Ann Van Reusel

Ghent University

Head of the research group Marine Biology

Filip Meysmans

Filip Meysmans

University of Antwerp

Professor

James Kairo

James Kairo (TBC)

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

Chief Scientist

Nico Koedam

Nico Koedam (TBC)

VUB

Professor at Faculty of Sciences and Bio-engineering Sciences

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Share this session

15 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Carbon sequestration will play a key role in limiting global warming to well below 2°C. Given the fact that oceans cover most of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts.

The speakers will discuss how to make use of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs). They will dive into the technical challenges as well as looking at how to balance the risks of accelerating the implementation of ocean NETs and which techniques are already offered by nature (“blue carbon”). This discussion covers policy schemes, societal acceptance of certain risks, and a science-based debate on what is technically feasible today. It focuses on the science-technology-policy nexus and gives special attention to the question of how to accelerate the delivery of effective solutions.

Ann  Van Reusel

Ann Van Reusel

Ghent University

Head of the research group Marine Biology

Filip Meysmans

Filip Meysmans

University of Antwerp

Professor

James Kairo

James Kairo (TBC)

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

Chief Scientist

Nico Koedam

Nico Koedam (TBC)

VUB

Professor at Faculty of Sciences and Bio-engineering Sciences

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Share this session

15 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Carbon sequestration will play a key role in limiting global warming to well below 2°C. Given the fact that oceans cover most of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts.

The speakers will discuss how to make use of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs). They will dive into the technical challenges as well as looking at how to balance the risks of accelerating the implementation of ocean NETs and which techniques are already offered by nature (“blue carbon”). This discussion covers policy schemes, societal acceptance of certain risks, and a science-based debate on what is technically feasible today. It focuses on the science-technology-policy nexus and gives special attention to the question of how to accelerate the delivery of effective solutions.

Ann  Van Reusel

Ann Van Reusel

Ghent University

Head of the research group Marine Biology

Filip Meysmans

Filip Meysmans

University of Antwerp

Professor

James Kairo

James Kairo (TBC)

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

Chief Scientist

Nico Koedam

Nico Koedam (TBC)

VUB

Professor at Faculty of Sciences and Bio-engineering Sciences

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager

Oceans

Deep dive session: The future of ocean negative emission technologies

Share this session

15 February 2023, 10:30 - 12:00 BRT (Rio de Janeiro)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 CET (Brussels)

15 February 2023, 14:30 - 16:00 WAT (Nigeria)

15 February 2023, 15:30 - 17:00 SAST (Cape Town)

15 February 2023, 08:30 - 10:00 EST (New York)

15 February 2023, 22:30 - 00:00 KST (Seoul)

15 February 2023, 21:30 - 23:00 CST (Beijing)

15 February 2023, 19:00 - 20:30 IST (New Delhi)

15 February 2023, 17:30 - 19:00 GST (Dubai)

Carbon sequestration will play a key role in limiting global warming to well below 2°C. Given the fact that oceans cover most of the Earth’s surface, ocean-based climate technologies have the potential to significantly upscale sequestration efforts.

The speakers will discuss how to make use of ocean-based negative emissions technologies (NETs). They will dive into the technical challenges as well as looking at how to balance the risks of accelerating the implementation of ocean NETs and which techniques are already offered by nature (“blue carbon”). This discussion covers policy schemes, societal acceptance of certain risks, and a science-based debate on what is technically feasible today. It focuses on the science-technology-policy nexus and gives special attention to the question of how to accelerate the delivery of effective solutions.

Ann  Van Reusel

Ann Van Reusel

Ghent University

Head of the research group Marine Biology

Filip Meysmans

Filip Meysmans

University of Antwerp

Professor

James Kairo

James Kairo (TBC)

Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

Chief Scientist

Nico Koedam

Nico Koedam (TBC)

VUB

Professor at Faculty of Sciences and Bio-engineering Sciences

Moderated by

Kristien Veys

Kristien Veys

Blue Cluster

Innovation Manager

Marijn Rabaut

Marijn Rabaut

Blue Cluster

Marine Policy Manager